Click for next page ( 106


The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 105
A Committee and Panel Member Biographies . l COMMITTEE FOR THE REVIEW OF NASA'S REVOLUTIONIZE AVIATION PROGRAM JOHN M. KLINEBERG, Chair, retired in 2001 after serving in the dual positions of president of Space Sys- tems/Loral and vice president of Loral Space and Com- munications. Currently he continues his association with the company as a member of Space Systems/ Loral's board of directors. He is also on the board of directors of Draper Lab, Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Swales Aerospace, Beltsville, Maryland. Previ- ously Dr. Klineberg spent 25 years with NASA in a variety of management and technical positions. He was director of the Goddard Space Flight Center, director of the Glenn Research Center, deputy associate admin- istrator for aeronautics and space technology at NASA Headquarters, and a technical leader at the Ames Re- search Center. Before joining NASA, he conducted fundamental research in fluid dynamics at the Califor- nia Institute of Technology and worked at the Douglas Aircraft Company and the Grumman Aircraft Com- pany. Dr. Klineberg earned his bachelor's degree in engineering from Princeton University and his master's and doctoral degrees from the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Klineberg is a member of the Aero- nautics and Space Engineering Board (ASEB) of the National Research Council. RICHARD ABBOTT is a technical fellow emeritus at 105 Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company in Palmdale, California. In 1997, he received a Ph.D. in chemical physics from Northern Illinois University, where his research concentrated on cooperative phenomena in molecular systems and the renormalization group. He continued studies as a research associate in statistical mechanics at the University of Chicago, James Franck Institute, where he contributed to theories of energy relaxation in condensed media using Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics techniques. His career includes over 20 years of experience in the areas of guidance, navigation and control systems design and analysis, sensor data fusion design, and sensor system simula- tion and modeling for both manned and unmanned air- craft. He has also supervised the development and ex- ecution of large-scale simulations of complex air vehicles. He led the development of the avionics func- tional architecture for the demonstration/validation phase of the YF-22 program, which included the inte- gration and fusion of numerous tactical sensor inputs. Lately he has developed fault detection and redundancy management algorithms for the navigation systems aboard the X-33 Single Stage to Orbit vehicle. He re- cently authored a technical report for the U.K. tactical UAV program in the area of onboard reconnaissance management. He served as principal investigator for the DARPA software enabled control technologies for reliable autonomous control project and has been the co-chair for the Technologies for Autonomous Control

OCR for page 105
106 session of the 2001 and 2002 EKE Aerospace Confer- ences. His present research interests include the exploita- tion of many-body system techniques in the control and management of large groups of cooperating vehicles. AN ASSESSMENT OF NASA 'S AERONAUTICS TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMS WALTER S. COLEMAN recently retired as president of the Regional Airline Association (RAA), which rep- resents U.S. regional and commuter airlines and suppli- ers of products and services that support the industry. He served as the RAA's president for 8 years and before that was director and vice president of operations for the Air Transport Association. From 1976- to 1981 he was director of the Airline Reservation Center of the Airline Scheduling Committees. He began his airline career in 1968 with Pan American World Anways, serving as a pilot, flight engineer, and superintendent of schedule de- velopment. He was a pilot in the U.S. Navy from 1960 to 1968 and served in the U.S. Naval Reserve from 1970 to 1986. Mr. Coleman earned a B.A. degree in business administration from Ohio University. ROBERT HILB is manager of the Advancecl Plight Systems Department at United Parcel Service. Captain Hilb graduated from the U.S. Air Force Academy with a B.S. in astronautical engineering and computer sci- ence. He attended Auburn University and received an M.S. in computer science. He has been an airline cap- tain for over 21 years. He is type rated in Boeing 727, 737, 757, and 767 aircraft. He served in the Air Force and the Air Force Reserve in various operational and staff assignments from which he retired. From 1981 until 1988 he was a 737 captain and headed the Opera- tions Computer Department at People Express Airlines. Captain Hilb joined United Parcel Service in 1988 as a 757 check airman and pilot supervisor. He currently heads the Advances! Flight Systems Department. He is also a member of the UPS CNS/ATM Working Group. He is chairman of various industry groups, including the RTCA Special Committee (SC) 186, Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast, Operations and Implementation Working Group and the ATA Flight Systems Integration Committee. He has chaired vari- ous other groups in RTCA, SAE, and ATA on various other new technologies such as Controller Pilot Data Link Communications, Flight Management Systems, and Airborne Separation Assurance. He holds patents on a number of aviation technologies. S. MICHAEL HUDSON recently retired as vice chair- man of Rolls-Royce North America. After Allison En- gine Company was acquired by Rolls-Royce, Mr. Hudson served as president, chief executive officer, chief operating officer, and was a member of the board of directors of Allison Engine Company, Inc. Previously, during his tenure at Allison, he served as executive vice president for engineering, chief engineer for advanced technology engines, chief engineer for small production engines, supervisor of the design for Model 250 engines, chief of preliminary design, and chief project engineer for vehicular gas turbines. Michael Hudson brings in- sight into propulsion engineering issues, related busi- ness issues, and the European perspective on aviation issues. He has also served on four NRC committees. RAYMOND LaFREY recently retired as manager of the MIT Lincoln Laboratory Air Traffic Control Mission Area. This activity encompasses surveil- lance, navigation, communications, and weather sensing, and involves 150 staff and support person- nel. Key elements include the development of air- port surface technology, modern open architecture surveillance systems, and integrated terminal and regional weather systems that provide time-critical weather knowledge directly to operational staff at FAA and airline facilities. After receiving a B.S.E.E. and an M.S.E.E. at Michigan State University, Mr. LaFrey served 6 years in the U.S. Army as a Signal Corps officer, installing satellite communications ground stations in Europe, Africa, and Vietnam. He joined MIT Lincoln Laboratory in 1969 and began developing air traffic control technology in 1974. During 1977-1982, he led the team that developed the first TCAS II flight hardware and conducted sur- veillance flight-test activities. He also led the design of TCAS II air-to-air coordination logic, which in- volved complex simulations and several hundred staged midair encounters. During the 1980s he led the development and flight-testing of a GPS naviga- tion set for small aircraft. He also led the Precision Runway Monitor Program, which enabled simulta- neous instrument approaches to parallel runways spaced as close as 3,000 feet. He has served on a variety of advisory boards, including the AAS Re- covery Team, the FAA RE&D Advisory Committee (ATS Subcommittee), the Defense Science Board Task Force on Aviation Safety, and most recently he was appointed to the FAA Research Engineering Ad- visory Committee (REDAC). He has received FAA awards for his work on TCAS, PRM and the ASR-9. He is also an inactive instrument-rated pilot.

OCR for page 105
APPENDIX A LOURDES Q. MAURICE is presently the chief scien- tific and technical advisor for the environment in the FAA's Office of Environment and Energy. She serves as the agency technical expert for basic and explor- atory research and advanced technology development focused on aircraft environmental impacts and the ap- plication of such technology to noise and emissions cer- tification. She previously served as the Air Force cleputy, basic research sciences and propulsion science and technology, in the Office of the Deputy Associate Secretary of the Air Force for Science and Technology. In this position she managed the $220 million per year Basic Research Sciences and $240 million per year Pro- pulsion Science and Technology portfolios at the Air Force secretariat. She also worked at the Air Force Research Laboratory's Propulsion and Power Direc- torate from 1983 to 1999 planning and executing basic, exploratory, and advanced development propulsion sci- ence and technology programs focusing on state-of-the- art aviation fuels and propulsion systems. Her areas of expertise include pollutant formation chemistry, com- bustion kinetics, hypersonic propulsion, and aviation fuels. She received a B.Sc. in chemical engineering and an M.Sc. in aerospace engineering from the University of Dayton in Ohio and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineer- ing from the University of London' s Imperial College. She is also a Distinguished Graduate of the National Defense University's Industrial College of the Armed Forces, where she earned an M.Sc. in national resource strategy. Dr. Maurice is serving her second term on the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) Propellants and Combustion Technical Com- mittee. She has authored over 80 publications and is a fellow of the AIAA, as well as a member of the Tau Beta Pi Honorary Engineering Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and the American Chemical Society (ACS). THEODORE H. OKIISHI is associate dean for re- search and outreach at Iowa State University's College of Engineering. Aside from a tour in Vietnam as a hy- draulics engineer at the Combined Intelligence Center in Saigon, Dr. Okiishi has spent most of his career at Iowa State. Among other positions, he served as the chair of the Mechanical Engineering Department. He is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical En- gineers and has twice received the George Wallace Melville Award from that society, the highest award for the best current original paper. He received the award most recently for research on boundary layer 107 transition on the blades of compressors and low-pres- sure turbine blades of gas turbine engines. He is vice president for the ASME International Gas Turbine In- stitute and a member of the board of directors of the American Society for Engineering Education (chair of the ASEE Engineering Research Council). He is also the editor of the ASME Journal of Turbomachinery. He is coauthor of a widely adopted fluid mechanics textbook. Dr. Okiishi received his Ph.D. from Iowa State. TOD PALM is the integrated product team leader for Space Structures at Northrop Grumman Corporation. He is currently serving as the program manager for development of advanced composite cryogenic tanks under the NASA Strategic Launch Initiative (SLI) Pro- gram. Mr. Palm has over 15 years of experience in com- posite structures R&D at Northrop Grumman. His roles over the last 5 years include lead structures engineer for the DARPA Quiet Supersonic Program, design en- gineer lead for composite fuselage development on the NASA High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) program, project manager for development and test of a BMI composite sandwich wing-box for the NASA HSCT, and Northrop Grumman project lead for the HSCT de- sign integration trade studies. Previously he served as principal investigator for the U.S. Air Force ultralightweight trade studies contract and has sup- ported structural issues on production platforms includ- ing the Kistler RLV, B2, F-18, and Global Hawk. Mr. Palm' s diverse background in composite structures in- cludes structural analysis, multidisciplinary optimiza- tion, durability and damage tolerance, materials char- acterization, advanced manufacturing development, and complex structural test article development/inte- "ration. He holds a B.S. degree in aeronautical engi- neering from California Polytechnic University, San Luis Obispo, and an engineering management certifi- cate from the California Institute of Technology. EDUARDO SALAS is a professor of psychology at the University of Central Florida (UCF), where he also holds an appointment as program director for the Hu- man Systems Integration Research Department at the Institute for Simulation and Training. He is also the director of UCF's Ph.D. Applied Experimental and Human Factors Program. Previously, he was a senior research psychologist and head of the Training Tech- nology Development Branch of the Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division for 15 years. During

OCR for page 105
108 that period, Dr. Salas served as a principal investigator for numerous R&D programs focusing on teamwork, team training, decision making under stress, and per- formance assessment. Dr. S. alas has coauthored over 200 journal articles and book chapters and has coedited 11 books. He is on or has been on the editorial boards of the Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psy- chology, Military Psychology, Interamerican Journal of Psychology, Applied Psychology: An International Journal, International Journal of Aviation Psychology, Group Dynamics, and the Journal of Organizational i AN ASSESSMENT OF NASA 'S AERONAUTICS TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMS He received a Ph.D. (1984) in industrial and organiza- tional psychology from Old Dominion University. Behavior. In addition, he has edited two special issues (one focusing on training and one on decision making in complex environments) for Human Factors. He has edited other special issues on team training and perfor- mance and training evaluation (Military Psychology), shared cognition (Journal of Organizational Behavior), and simulation and training (International Journal of Aviation Psychology). He is also the current editor of the journal. He currently edits an annual series, Ad- vances in Human Performance and Cognitive Engi- neering Research (Elsevier). Dr. Salas has held numer- ous positions in the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society during the past 15 years. He is the past chair of the Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making Tech- nical Group, past chair of the Training Technical Group, member of the Jerome H. Ely Human Factors Articles award committee, and he served on the Alphonse Chapanis Best Student Paper Award Com- mittee. He is also very active with the Society for In- dustnal and Organizational Psychology (SIOP), which is Division 14 of the American Psychological Associa- tion. He is currently the series editor for the Profes- sional Practice Book Series and has served on numer- ous committees throughout the years. His expertise includes helping organizations to foster teamwork, de- sign and implement team training strategies, facilitate training effectiveness, manage decision making under stress, develop performance measurement tools, and design learning environments. He is currently working ~ . ~ ~ . ~ - On designing tools and techniques to minimize human errors in aviation, law enforcement, and medical envi- ronments. He has consulted to a variety of manufactur- ing, pharmaceutical laboratories, industrial, and gov- ernmental organizations. Dr. Salas is a fellow of the American Psychological Association (SIOP and Divi- sion 21- the Division of Applied Experimental and Engineering Psychology), the Human Factors and Er- gonomics Society, and a recipient of the Meritorious Civil Service Award from the Department of the Navy. THOMAS SHERIDAN, NAE, is Ford Professor Emeri- tus of Engineering and Applied Psychology in the De- partments of Mechanical Engineering and Aeronautics and Astronautics and director of the Human-Machine Systems Laboratory at Massachusetts Institute of Tech- nology (MIT). His research has been on mathematical models of human operator and socioeconomic systems, on man-computer interaction in piloting aircraft and in supervising undersea and industrial robotic systems, on computer graphic technology for information search- ing and group decision making, and on arms control. He has an S.M. degree from the University of Califor- nia, a Sc.D. from MIT, and an honorary doctorate from Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands. He has served as president of both the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society and the IEEE Systems, Man and Cybernetics Society and is a fellow of both organiza- tions. He has chaired the National Research Council's Committee on Human Factors and has served on nu- merous other NRC committees. He is senior editor of the MIT Press journal Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. EDMOND L. SOLIDAY was employed by United A~- lines for over 35 years as a pilot, human factors instruc- tor, flight manager, and staff executive, serving the last 11 years as vice president of safety, quality assurance, and security. During his time in the safety role, he was responsible for flight safety, aircraft cabin safety, oc- cupational safety, environmental compliance, opera- tional quality assurance, security, computer security, and emergency response. During his career he made significant contributions in the development of emer- gency response methodologies, flight crew human fac- tors safety initiatives, enhanced ground proximity warning devices, flight operations quality assurance programs (digital performance monitoring and analy- sis), union management occupational safety initiatives, code share and express carrier auditing, aviation indus- try security screening technology implementation, and risk analysis methodologies. He has served on numer- ous aviation-safety-related advisory boards and com- missions, including the Gore Commission's Aviation Security Baseline Working Group ant] the Commercial Aviation Safety Team (chairman for 5 years), the Flight Operations Quality Assurance Advisory Rulemaking

OCR for page 105
APPENDIX A -.' ~ ' 109 Committee, past chairman of the Air Transport Asso- ciation Safety Council, the IATA Flight Safety Com- mittee, past chairman of the Star Alliance Safety Com- mittee, and the Air Transport Association Environment Executive Subcommittee, and past chairman of the ATA Environmental Committee. He currently serves on the executive board of the Flight Safety Foundation, the NASA Aviation Safety Program Executive Panel, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Global Air- line Industry Program Advisory Group, vice chairman of the Adler Planetarium Board of Trustees, and the Trinity International University Board of Regents. Ad- ditionally, he teaches "Introduction to Aviation Safety and Security Programs" at George Washington Uni- versity. He has most recently served as a consultant to the RAND Corporation, the Boeing Company, and Greenbriar Equity, LLP. Among his awards are the Bendix Trophy, the Vanguard Trophy, and the Laura Tabor Barbour International Air Safety Award, FBI and FAA distinguished service awards, the Distinguished Flying Cross, two Bronze Stars, and the Purple Heart. ALFRED G. STRIZ holds the L.A. Comp Chair in the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering at the University of Oklahoma. He runs the AME Computa- tional Mechanics Laboratory and is the associate direc- tor of the Center for Engineering Optimization. Dr. Striz specializes in computational mechanics with an empha- sis on multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) and on the development of efficient structural optimization methodologies. In addition, he is interested in multicriteria optimization and in the high-performance computing aspects of optimization. He has concentrated on applying these techniques to aircraft and spacecraft systems. He is on the Board of the new University of Oklahoma Supercomputing Center for Education and Research. Since 1993, he has been a member of the AIAA MDO Technical Committee, where he presently leads an effort toward a new MDO white paper. He has published in excess of 100 refereed technical papers and journal articles and given a number of invited lectures. Dr. Striz received a Ph.D. in aeronautics and astronau- tics from Purdue University. FRANK F. TUNG served as the deputy director of the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center prior to his retirement in July 2002. Prior to being named deputy director in 1989, Dr. Tung served in a variety of technical management roles at the Volpe Center, in- cluding chief of the Traffic Control Systems ant] Urban Transportation Systems Division (1971 to 1982), asso- ciate director of the Office of Systems Assessment (1982 to 1984), and associate director of Operations Engineering (1984 to 19891. He came to the center from NASA in 1971. He has also worked on the engineering staffs of the Lockheed Company and IBM. Dr. Tung's technical expertise includes navigation and surveil- lance, air traffic control management systems, system development and engineering, and requirement analy- sis. He has a very good understanding of the U.S. air traffic control system. Prior to his retirement, Dr. Tung took a 6-month detail with the FAA Office of Airports. His research during the detail was on the evolution of major airports in the Uniter! States and related capacity issues. Dr. Tung received a B.Sc. and an M.Sc. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. from Columbia University. THOMAS L. WILLIAMS is currently vice president of engineering, logistics and technology for Northrop Grumman's Air Combat System Business. He provides the engineering, logistics, test and evaluation talent tools and resources to support a number of programs at Northrop Grumman Air Combat Systems. These in- clude the F/18 program, the B-2 Stealth Bomber pro- gram, the F-5/T-38 program, the DARPA Naval UCAV program, and the NASA Next Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle program. Prior to assuming his current position Mr. Williams served as program manager for the B-2 Stealth Bomber and the Future Long-Range Strike Product. He has held numerous senior program management and technical management positions at Northrop Grumman. Mr. Williams is a member of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board of the Na- tional Research Council. DEBRA WINCHESTER is the director of strategy for Raytheon's Air Traffic Management Systems, where she is responsible for strategy development and imple- mentation of key business issues, including air traffic management products and services along with ATM business and policy issues worldwide. Prior to working at Raytheon, Ms. Winchester spent 18 years with Hughes Aircraft Company, working as a program man- ager in oceanic air traffic control, as a manager of air traffic control marketing business development, and as a research engineer. Ms. Winchester has participated in a variety of industry working groups, including the FAA's Research, Engineering, and Development Ad- visory Committee. She received a B.S. in computer

OCR for page 105
110 science from North Dakota in 1978 and an M.S. in elec- trical engineering/computers from the University of Southern California in 1981. VEHICLE SYSTEMS PANEL MEMBERS THOMAS L. WILLIAMS, Panel Chair (see biogra- phy above) MARK BALAS is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and is cur- rently a professor at the Center for Aerospace Struc- tures and Aerospace Engineering Sciences at the Uni- versity of Colorado at Boulder. Dr. Balas has published extensively in the field of controls, with emphasis on modeling, estimation, and control of large-scale and distributed parameter systems, including flexible struc- tures. He is the general chair for the AIAA Guidance, Navigation and Control Conference. Dr. Balas received a Ph.D. from the University of Denver in Colorado. ROBERT GOETZ obtained a master's degree in engi- neering mechanics from the Virginia Polytechnic Insti- tute and State University and a B.S. in aeronautical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology. He recently retired as vice president of Lockheed Mar- tin Skunk Works. He has served as the director of engi- neering, Lockheed Advanced Development Company; acting director of engineering and advanced programs, Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company; and deputy director of engineering, managing engineering support for Advanced Development Projects. He served with NASA for 29 years in a variety of positions, the last of which was as deputy center director at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston. He has served as an officer in the U.S. Air Force. Under the NASA Execu- tive Development Program, he was assigned to the Of- fice of Aeronautics and Space Technology at NASA Headquarters in Washington, D.C. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and of the American Astronautical Society. S. MICHAEL HUDSON (see biography above) STEVEN IDEN is a senior staff engineer with Lockheed Martin Corporation in Fort Worth, Texas. During his 18 years of aerospace power work, Mr. Iden worked in the area of electrical and propulsion integra- tion, with a heavy focus on integrated starter genera- tors for main propulsion engines and directed energy AN ASSESSMENT OF NASA 'S AERONAUTICS TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMS weapons. Mr. Iden also has significant experience in electrical subsystem component modeling for both military and commercial aviation. He has a B.S. and an M.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Dayton. SHEILA KIA is an engineering group manager for General Motors Manufacturing Engineering. She has been a member of the National Materials Advisory Board at the National Research Council since 1999. Dr. Kia holds a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Cambridge University in England. Her expertise is in automotive finishing, coatings, polymer substrates, and multiphase interactions with an emphasis on manufac- turing applications. GARY KOOPMANN is a distinguished professor of mechanical engineering and director of the Center for Acoustics and Vibration at Pennsylvania State Univer- sity. Dr. Koopmann has made significant contributions to the science and technology of noise and vibration control, both as an engineering educator and an accom- plished researcher. Prior to Penn State, he served in a range of positions at the U.S. Naval Research Labora- tory, the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research at the University of Southampton in Great Britain, and the University of Houston's Laboratory for Sound and Vibration Research. He collaborates on DOD-funded research focusing on adaptive structures. Dr. Koopmann's research accomplishments focus on noise-control-by-design strategies that combine the dis- ciplines of structure dynamics, acoustics, and optimi- zation into a united methodology. In 2001 Koopmann was awarded ASME's Per Bruel Gold Medal for semi- nal contributions to the theory and practice of noise and vibration control in mechanical systems HARRY LIPSITT is professor emeritus in the Depart- ment of Mechanical and Materials Engineering at Wright State University, Dayton, an adjunct professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineer- ing at Ohio State University, and an honorary profes- sor in the Interdisciplinary Research Centre for High Performance Materials at the University of Birming- ham, U.K. He spent 30 years at the Air Force Wright Laboratories, where he was the leader of a research group working on the development and optimization of metallic and intermetallic materials for use in the hot sections of aircraft turbine engines. His earlier re- search included work on the fracture toughness of ce-

OCR for page 105
APPENDIX A 111 ramics; deformation mechanisms in two-phase alloys; creep and fatigue; and deformation mechanisms in or- clered intermetallics. Dr. Lipsitt has published more than 100 technical articles in refereed journals. He has just completed a 6-year tenure on the National Research Council's National Materials Advisory Board. In 1998 he served on the NRC Panel for Review of Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) Mechanics Research Proposals, the NRC Panel for Review of AFOSR Materials Proposals, and was chair of the NRC Panel for Review of AFOSR Aging Aircraft Proposals. In 1999 he again served on the NRC Panel- for Review of AFOSR Mechanics Proposals and was chair of the NRC Panel for Review of AFOSR Materials Propos- als. Dr. Lipsitt was chair of the 2000 and 2001 NRC Panels for Review of AFOSR Materials Proposals. He is presently serving as a member of the Committee on Materials for the Defense After Next, chair of the Panel on Structural and Multifunctional Materials for that committee, and as chair of the Materials for 21st Cen- tury Army Trucks Committee. In 2001, Dr. Lipsitt was selected to receive the Laudise Award from the Na- tional Materials Advisory Board for his outstanding and dedicated service to that board. LOURDES Q. MAURICE (see biography above) DUANE McRUER, NAE, is concurrently an indepen- dent consultant and chairman of Systems Technology, Inc. (STI). He received his undergraduate and graduate education at the California Institute of Technology. Since 1950, his research has focused on aerospace and ground vehicle and human pilot dynamics, automatic and manual vehicular control, and vehicle flying~an- dling qualities. He has published more than 125 techni- cal papers and seven books, including Analysis of Non- linear Control Systems (Wiley, 1961; Dover, 1971) and Aircraft Dynamics and Automatic Control (Princeton, 1973~. He has also been involved with applications of these topics in more than 50 aerospace and land ve- hicles, and he has five patents on flight control and stability augmentation systems. Besides a career as president and technical director of STI (unti! 1993), he has been Regent's Lecturer at the University of Cali- fornia, Santa Barbara, and was the 1992-1993 Hunsaker Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology . His past service for various governmen- tal and professional societies includes terms as presi- dent of the American Automatic Control Council and chairman of the National Research Council Aeronau- tics and Space Engineering Board, the American Insti- tute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) Techni- cal Committee on Guidance and Control, the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Aerospace Control and Guidance Systems Committee, and a member of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Advisory Council. He is a fellow of the Insti- tute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE), the Society of Automotive Engineers, and the Human Fac- tors and Ergonomics Society, an honorary fellow of the AIAA, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Other honors include the Caltech Distin- guished Alumni Award, the NASA Distinguished Pub- lic Service Medal, the AIAA Mechanics and Control of Flight Award, the Franklin Institute's Levy Medal, the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society's Alexander Williams Award, and SAE's Aerospace Engineering Leadership Award. THEODORE H. OKIISHI (see biography above) TOD PALM (see biography above) ALFRED G. STRIZ (see biography above) MAHLON WILSON received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of California at Santa Barbara. His thesis research was in heterogeneous ca- talysis, with particular emphasis in adsorbate-surface interactions on nanoscale catalyst particles. Subse- quently, he became a postdoctoral research fellow at Los Alamos National Laboratory, working in the Core Research Program on polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). He pioneered the catalyzed membrane con- cept, which has since become the standard technology used by the PEFC community. In 1991, Dr. Wilson became a technical staff member at Los Alamos, and he continues to work primarily in the PEFC area. Dr. Wilson has more than a dozen patents in fuel cell tech- nology, the majority of which have been licensed to the fuel cell industry. J. MITCHELL WOLFF is an associate professor at Wright State University. He is the author of over 45 technical papers and journal articles in the areas of pro- pulsion, computational methods, MEMS instrumenta- tion, unsteady aerodynamics, and forced response. Dr. Wolff is a member of the American Institute of Aero- nautics and Astronautics (AIAA) Air-Breathing Pro- pulsion Technical Committee and the turbine engine

OCR for page 105
112 and education subcommittees. He also represents the United States as a scientific committee member for both the International Society of Air Breathing Engines (ISOABE) and the International Symposium of Trans- port Phenomena and Dynamics of Rotating Machinery (ISROMAC). He has received several awards, includ- ing the SAE Ralph R. Teetor Educational Award and the ASEE Dow Outstanding New Educator Award. Dr. Wolff received a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Purdue University. MICHAEL ZYDA is the director of the Modeling, Vir- tual Environments and Simulation (MOVES) Institute, located at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS), Monterey, California. He is also a professor in the De- partment of Computer Science at NPS. Since 1986, he has been the director of the NPSNET Research Group. Dr. Zyda' s research interests include computer graphics, large-scale, networked 3D virtual environments, com- puter-generated characters, video production, entertain- ment/defense collaboration, and modeling and simula- tion. He is known for his work on software architectures for networked virtual environments. Dr. Zyda was a member of the National Research Council's Committee on Virtual Reality Research and Development and was the chair of the National Research CounciT's Computer Science and Telecommunications Board Committee on Modeling and Simulation: Linking Entertainment and Defense. From that report, for the Deputy Assistant Sec- retary of the Army for Research and Technology, Dr. Zyda drafted the operating plan and research agenda for the University of Southern California' s Institute for Cre- ative Technologies. He began his career in computer graphics in 1973 as part of an undergraduate research group, the Senses Bureau, at the University of Califor- nia,-San Diego. Dr. Zyda received a B.A. in bioengi- neering from the University of California, San Diego, in 1976, an M.S. in computer science-neurocybernetics from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, in 1978, and a D.Sc. in computer science from Washington Uni- versity, St. Louis, in 1984. AIRSPACE SYSTEMS PANEL MEMBERS FRANK F. TUNG, Panel Chair (see biography above) CHARLES AALFS is a retired air traffic control spe- cialist for the FAA. He has over 30 years of experience as an air traffic controller for both the U.S. Navy and the FAA. While with the FAA, he served as an air traf- AN ASSESSMENT OF NASA 'S AERONA UTICS TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMS fic controller, air traffic automation specialist, air~traf- fic facility officer, air traffic facility manager, air traf- fic regional office automation specialist and branch manager, and division manager of resource manage- ment. When he retired, he was the manager of the new Southern California TRACON in San Diego, Califor- nia. As an automation specialist, he was responsible for the software maintenance of the terminal automated radar system called ARTS III and IIIA. He is also the author of many design changes to the ARTS III pro- gram, one of which was the design to allow automated handoffs from one ARTS III site to another. Since re- tiring from the FAA, Mr. Aalfs has been a consultant to the FAA on air traffic training, airspace studies for the New England and Seattle areas, and the FAA' s air traf- fic facility management structure. He has also con- sulted for the Boeing Company in establishing its new air traffic management business and currently is a con- sultant and program manager for an airspace study of Southern California. Mr. Aalfs has also served on two NBC study groups: the Panel on Human Factors in Air Traffic Control Automation and the Committee to Study the FAA's Methodologies for Estimating Air Traffic Controller Staffing Standards. YAAKOV BAR-SHALOM is currently a Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Connecti- cut, where he has been a professor since 1976. Previ- ously he was a research engineer with Systems Con- trol, Inc. Dr. Bar-Shalom received a B.S. and an M.S. in electrical engineering from Technion (Israel) in 1963 and 1967, respectively, and a Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1970. His research interests include tar- get tracking with radar, sonar, or infrared sensors; air traffic control; and surveillance systems with multiple sensors. Dr. Bar-Shalom is the author of seven books and over 260 publications on estimation and tracking. He is a fellow of the IEEE and a member of Eta Kappa Nu and Sigma Xi. He is also a licensed single-engine pilot. He served as president of the International Soci- ety of Information Fusion in 2000 and 2002. BARRY BERSON is currently a technical fellow at Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, where he is respon- sible for the planning, conduct, and documentation of human factors activities directed toward supporting Lockheed Martin aeronautics programs. Previously, Mr. Berson served as a research engineer in human fac- tors and crew systems with Lockheed, Hughes Aircraft

OCR for page 105
APPENDIX A Company, Perceptronics, Integrated Sciences, and Dunlap and Associates. He has authored or coauthored over 100 human factors technical reports and is a fel- low of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. He is currently a part-time instructor at California State University, Northridge (CSUN), teaching graduate- level human factors courses. Mr. Berson received his B.A. in psychology from UCLA in 1969 and his M.A. in human factors psychology from CSUN in 1974. WALTER COLEMAN (see biography above) WILLIAM DUNLAY is currently a principal with Leigh Fisher Associates (LEA), a consulting firm that specializes in aviation. He has been with LEA since 1978, where, as leader of LFA's airfield and airspace practice, he directed analyses of more than 40 airports in the United States and overseas. He recently man- aged delay reduction strategy studies for the LaGuardia and John F. Kennedy International airports, an airfield simulation study (using the Total Airspace and Airport Modeler TAAM) for Seattle-Tacoma International Air- port, and analyses of redesigned flight procedures for the New York-New Jersey Metroplex airspace. Dr. Dunlay is currently a visiting lecturer and research en- gineer at the University of California, Berkeley, where he is teaching an airport design course and working on FAA-sponsored research at the National Center of Ex- cellence for Aviation Operations Research. He previ- ously was an assistant professor of civil engineering at the University of Pennsylvania (1976-1978) and the University of Texas at Austin (1974-1976~. Dr. Dunlay received a B.S. in civil engineering from Penn State in 1965 and an M.S. in 1970. He obtained a Ph.D. in civil engineering from the University of California at Ber- keley in 1974. ANGELA GITTENS is director of the Miami-Dade Aviation Department. In this position, she is respon- sible for the operations and management of Miami In- ternational Airport and five general aviation airports. Before that, Ms. Gittens was vice president of TBI Air- port Management, a company that manages airport fa- cilities under contract. Prior to that, she directed Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport. She began her aviation career as deputy director for business and fi- nance at San Francisco International Airport. She was previously deputy administrator at San Francisco Gen- eral Hospital and assistant vice president of the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation. Ms. 113 Gittens earned a bachelor's degree from Fairleig-h Dickinson University. ROBERT HILB (see biography above) R. B OWEN LOFTIN holds a B.S. in physics from Texas A&M University and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in physics from Rice University. In August 2000 he joined Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia as professor of electrical and computer engineering and professor of computer science. In addition, Dr. Loftin is executive director of the Virginia Modeling, Analysis and Simula- tion Center and the university's director of simulation programs with responsibility for the university's gradu- ate programs in modeling and simulation. Before com- ing to Old Dominion University, Dr. Loftin was a pro- fessor in the Department of Computer Science and its chair and the director of the NASA Virtual Environments Research Institute at the University of Houston. Since 1983, Dr. Loftin and his students and coworkers have been exploring the application of advanced software technologies, such as artificial] intelligence and interac- tive, three-dimensional computer graphics, to the devel- opment of training and visualization systems. He is a frequent consultant to both industry and government in the area of advanced training technologies and scientific and engineering data visualization. Awards received by Dr. Loftin include the University of Houston-Downtown Awards for Excellence in Teaching and Service, the American Association of Artificial Intelligence Award for an innovative application of artificial intelligence, NASA's Space Act Award, the NASA Public Service Medal, end the 1995 NASA Invention of the Year award. He is the author or coauthor of more than a hundred technical publications. J. DAVID POWELL is emeritus faculty in the Aero- nautics and Astronautics Department at Stanford Uni- versity. Dr. Powell received a B.S. in mechanical engi- neering from MIT in 1960 and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University in 1966 and 1970, respectively. Dr. Powell has been on the Stanford faculty since 1971. He continues to be active in research since becoming emeritus in 1998. His research interests included space tether dynamics and control, internal combustion en- gine control, and the design of aerospace digital flight control systems. More recently, GPS-based attitude determination augmented with inertial sensors, the use of GPS for air and land vehicle surveillance and navi-

OCR for page 105
114 gation, and the design of GPS-aided flight displays have become his research focus. He is the author of more than a hundred research papers and two of the leading control textbooks. Dr. Powell is a fellow of AIAA and ASME and is an aircraft owner and instru- ment-rated pilot. EDUARDO SALAS (see biography above) DEBRA WINCHESTER (see biography above) Is, , , i,.\ . ~ . . AN ASSESSMENT OF NASA 'S AERONAUTICS TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMS Army Science Board. Dr. Gawron received the-A.R. Lauer Safety Award from the Human Factors and Er- gonom~cs Society in 2002 and the Decoration for Ex- ceptional Civilian Service in 2000. She has earned de- grees from the State University of New York at Buffalo (B.A., psychology; M.S., industrial engineering; M.B.A., business administration), State University College at Geneseo (M.A., psychology), and the Uni- versity of Illinois (Ph.D., engineering psychology). AVIATION SAFETY PANEL MEMBERS THOMAS SHERIDAN, NAE, Panel Chair (see biog- raphy above) RICHARD ABBOTT (see biography above) JAMES DANAHER retired in 1998 as chief of the Operational Factors Division of the Office of Aviation Safety, National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB). He has more than 35 years of government and industry experience in the human factors and safety fields. Af- ter joining NTSB in 1970, he served in various man- agement positions, with a special emphasis on human performance in flight operations and air traffic control. He has participated in the on-scene investigation of numerous accident investigations, public hearings, and the development of NTSB recommendations. He is a former naval aviator and holds a commercial pilot's license with single-engine, multiengine, and instrument ratings. Among other NRC assignments, he served on the Panel on Human Factors in Air Traffic Control Automation for the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Mr. Danaher earned a master's degree in experimental psychology from Ohio State University. VALERIE GAWRON is the chief scientist, Human Factors, at Veridian. Her experience in engineering psychology and human factors covers the areas of de- sign, research, simulation, and training. She has pro- duced numerous simulation programs and training manuals and conducted many experiments to improve aviation. She has over 250 publications including a handbook on human performance measurement. She is an associate fellow of the American Institute of Aero- nautics and Astronautics, a fellow of the Human Fac- tors and Ergonomics Society, and a member of the RONALD HESS is a professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering at the Uni- versity of California, Davis (UCD). He has been a member of the UCD faculty since 1982. Before that, Dr. Hess was a research scientist at NASA Ames Re- search Center, where he conducted research in the flight control and handling qualities of vertical and short take- off and landing aircraft and rotorcraft. He is an associ- ate fellow of the AIAA, a senior member of the IEEE, and a member of the American Helicopter Society, Tau Beta Pi, and Sigma Xi. Dr. Hess is an associate editor of the Journal of Aircraft, the IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, and the Journal of Aerospace Engineering. He is also a registered engi- neer in the state of California. Dr. Hess received a Ph.D. in aerospace engineering from the University of Cin- cinnati in 1970. ADIB KANAFANI, NAE, is Edward G. and John R. Cahill Professor of Civil Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. Since joining the faculty at Berkeley in 1970, he has taught and conducted research on transportation systems, transportation engineering, airport planning and design, and air transportation eco- nomics. He has made contributions to air transporta- tion, including demand analysis, airport capacity analy- sis methods, and airline network analysis. In 1997 he was founding co-director of the National Center of Excellence for Aviation Operations Research (NEXTOR), a university/industry partnership funded by the FAA and headquartered at Berkeley. He served as director of UC Berkeley's Institute of Transporta- tion Studies from 1983 to 1998 and as chairman of UC Berkeley's Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering from 1987 to 2002. He is a recipient of numerous awards, including the American Society of Civil Engineers' Walter Huber Research Prize in 1982, the Horonjeff Award in 1988, and the James Laurie Prize in 2000. He was elected to the National Academy

OCR for page 105
APPENDIX A of Engineering in 2002. Professor Kanafani earned his Ph.D. in transportation engineering from the Univer- sity of California at Berkeley. DAVID KOHLMAN is a principal engineer emeritus for Engineering Systems, Inc., a professional engineer- ing consulting firm and laboratory. Dr. Kohlman holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in aeronautical engineering from the University of Kansas and received a Ph.D. degree in aeronautics and astronautics from MIT in 1963. His industrial experience included Sandia Corporation and the Boeing Company before his appointment to the fac- ulty at the University of Kansas. Dr. Kohlman spent 18 years as professor of aerospace engineering at Kansas, where his research included airplane design, aerody- namics, stability and control, flight testing, and aircraft icing. In 1982, Dr. Kohlman became the president of Kohlman Systems Research, Inc., a flight testing and instrumentation company, and Kohlman Aviation Cor- poration, a consulting, research, and ice protection sys- tems company. He joined Engineering Systems, Inc., in 1993. Dr. Kohlman teaches a short course at the University of Kansas on aircraft icing and has presented the course for major aircraft manufacturers and univer- sities in Europe, Canada, and the United States. Dr. Kohlman is a licensed, instrument-rated pilot with over 3,200 hours of flight time and a licensed ground in- structor. Dr. Kohlman has written a book on V/STOL airplanes, authored over 50 technical papers and re- ports, and assisted as an expert in more than 200 air- craft accident cases. Dr. Kohlman is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. RAYMOND LaFREY (see biography above) 115 JOHN McCARTHY recently retired as manager for scientific and technical program development at the Naval Research Laboratory in Monterey, California, and currently is president of Aviation Weather Associ- ates, Inc., a consulting company. Previously, Dr. McCarthy served as special assistant for program de- velopment to the director of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), in Boulder, Colorado. Prior to that, he served as the director of the Research Applications Program (RAP) at NCAR. As director of RAP, he led research associated with aviation weather hazards, including NCAR activities associated with the FAA Aviation Weather Development Program, the FAA Terminal Doppler Weather Radar Program, and a national icing/winter storm research program. Previ- ously, he directed NCAR activities associated with the Low-Level Windshear Alert System (LLWAS) project, which addressed the technical development of sensing systems to detect and warn of low-altitude windshear, the Joint Airport Weather Studies (JAWS), and the Classify, Locate and Avoid Wind Shear (CLAWS) project at NCAR. Additionally, Dr. McCarthy was the principal meteorologist associated with the develop- ment of the FAA Wind Shear Training Aid. In January 2000, Dr. McCarthy was named a fellow of the Ameri- can Meteorological Society. Since the beginning of his tenure at NRL, Dr. McCarthy has developed programs in improving ceiling and visibility forecasting and flight operations risk assessment and a broad program effort to improve short-term weather information to navy battlegroups. Dr. McCarthy received a Ph.D. in geophysical sciences from the University of Chicago (19733. EDMOND L. SOLIDAY (see biography above)