Click for next page ( 180


The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 179
Appendix Biographical Sketches Paul R. Sackett (Chair) is professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. His research interests revolve around legal, psychometric, and policy aspects of psychological testing, assessment, and personnel decision making in workplace settings. He has served as the editor of Personnel Psychology, as president of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, as cochair of the Joint Com- mittee on the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing, as a member of the National Research Council's Board on Testing and Assess- ment, and as chair of the American Psychological Association's Board of Scientific Affairs. He has a Ph.D. in industrial and organizational psychol- ogy from Ohio State University. David J. Armor is professor of public policy in the School of Public Policy at George Mason University, where he is director of the Ph.D. program. He also teaches statistics and social policy and conducts research in edu- cation, military manpower, and family policy. He began his research in military manpower while at the Rand Corporation. Between 1986 and 1989 he served as principal deputy and acting assistant secretary for Force Management and Personnel in the U.S. Department of Defense. He was a member of the National Research Council's Committee on Military Enlist- ment Standards. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from Harvard University. lerald G. Bachman is program director and distinguished senior research scientist in the Survey Research Center of the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. His scientific publications focus 179

OCR for page 179
180 EVALUATING MILITARY ADVERTISING AND RECRUITING on youth and social issues. His current research interests include drug use and attitudes about drugs; youth views about military service; other values, attitudes, and behaviors of youth; and public opinion as related to a number of other social issues. He is a principal investigator on the Monitoring the Future project and the principal investigator on the Youth Attitudes About Military Service project. He has a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Pennsylvania. Marilyn Dabady (Senior Research Associate) is study director for the National Research Council's Panel on Methods for Assessing Discrimina- tion in the Committee on National Statistics. Her background is in social psychology, organizational behavior, and human resource management. Currently, her main areas of interest are interpersonal and intergroup relations; prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination; and diversity man- agement. She has a bachelor's degree in psychology from the University at Albany, State University of New York, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in psychology from Yale University. lohn Eighmey holds the Raymond O. Mithun Land Grant Chair in Adver- tising in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the Uni- versity of Minnesota. He is an authority on advertising and marketing, consumer research, and the management of strategic communication pro- grams. He has held senior management positions at Young & Rubicam, a worldwide advertising agency based in New York City, and at the Federal Trade Commission in Washington, DC. He has a Ph.D. in marketing from the University of Iowa. Martin Fishbein is the Harold C. Coles Distinguished Professor of Com- munications in the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania. His areas of expertise include attitude theory and measurement, commu- nication and persuasion, behavioral prediction and change, and interven- tion development, implementation, and evaluation. He also has carried out studies of the relations among beliefs, attitudes, intentions, and behaviors in field and laboratory settings. He has a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of California at Los Angeles. Carolyn Sue Hofstrand is the director of counseling and guidance at Taylor High School in Volusia County, Florida. She is a nationally certi- fied school counselor with experience at elementary, middle, high, and postsecondary schools. She was named National Secondary School Coun- selor of the Year 2000 by the American School Counselor Association and has been involved in leadership positions in counseling organizations at

OCR for page 179
APPENDIX: BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 181 the state, local, and national levels. She has a master's degree in educa- tion, counseling, and guidance from North Dakota State University, where she serves on the board of visitors for the College of Education and Human Resources. Paul F. Hogan is vice president and senior economist at The Lewin Group in Fairfax, Virginia. He has more than 20 years of experience in applying microenonomics, statistics, and operations research methods to problems in labor economics, including labor supply and demand, efficient staffing methods, and performance and cost measurement. He served as the senior analyst on the President's Military Manpower Task Force and as director of Manpower Planning and Analysis in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, the office charged with staffing methods and criteria used by military departments to determine demands for personnel. He was awarded the Secretary of Defense Distinguished Civilian Service medal in 1982 and 1985, and the Navy Superior Civilian Service medal in 1980. His doctoral studies include economics, econometrics, and finance at the University of Rochester and his undergraduate degree is in economics from the Univer- sity of Virginia. lames laccard is a distinguished professor of psychology at the State University of New York, Albany. He areas of expertise include experi- mental design and statistical analyses. He has written several books on statistical analysis. His work over the past 20 years has included research studies on the effects parental influence on youth decision making and on the formation of youth attitudes as a function of information input. He has a Ph.D. in social psychology with a minor in quantitative methods and cognitive psychology from the University of Illinois. Carolyn Maddy-Bernstein is associate to the executive vice president at the University of Arizona where she directs the University's diversity initiatives. Her expertise includes research and service in career and tech- nical education, guidance and counseling, and educating students who are members of underrepresented groups. From 1988 to 1999, she served as director of the Office of Student Services for the National Center for Research in Vocational Education at the University of Illinois, Urbana- Champaign. As a Louisiana State University faculty member, she taught and worked on research and service projects funded by the Governor's Office of Workforce Development and the Department of Education. She has been a public school teacher, counselor, and administrator at the secondary and postsecondary levels. She has a Ph.D. in education from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

OCR for page 179
182 EVALUATING MILITARY ADVERTISING AND RECRUITING Anne S. Mavor (Study Director) is the staff director for the Committee on Human Factors and the Committee on the Youth Population and Military Recruitment. Her previous National Research Council work has included studies on occupational analysis and the enhancement of human perfor- mance, modeling human behavior and command decision making, human factors in air traffic control automation, human factors consider- ations in tactical display for soldiers, scientific and technological chal- lenges of virtual reality, emerging needs and opportunities for human factors research, and modeling cost and performance for purposes of mili- tary enlistment. For the past 25 years, her work has concentrated on human factors, cognitive psychology, and information system design. She has an M.S. in experimental psychology from Purdue University. Carol A. Mutter is a retired lieutenant general of the United States Marine Corps. Her experience has been in research, development, and acquisi- tion, as well as financial management, logistics, personnel administration, and equal opportunity. In her most recent Marine Corps assignment, she was the senior Marine Corps personnel management executive, making policy for and managing the careers and quality of life of all Marines and civilians working for the Marine Corps. She is the chair of the Defense Advisory Committee on Women in the Services, as well as currently serving on the National Advisory Council of the Alliance for National Defense, the Advisory Board for the Indiana Council on World Affairs, and is the National President of the Women Marines Association, as well as a senior fellow at the Joint Forces Staff College. She has an M.A. in national security and strategic studies from the Naval War College in Newport, RI. Luther B. Otto is William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of Soci- ology emeritus at North Carolina State University, Raleigh. His research focuses on youth and careers. He directed the Career Development Study, a detailed study of the early career histories of 7,000 young men and women from the time they were juniors in high school through age 30. He has published numerous articles, chapters, and books on youth and careers. He served two four-year terms on the Basic Social-Cultural Research Review Committee of the National Institutes of Health. He has been active in professional associations, has served in a number of editorial capacities, and frequently consults with federal and state agencies and private foun- dations on issues related to youth, education, and work. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. William l. Strickland is vice president of the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) in Alexandria, Virginia. He also directs its

OCR for page 179
APPENDIX: BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 183 Workforce Analysis and Training Systems Division. He is a retired Air Force colonel who was director of human resources research at the U.S. Air Force Armstrong Laboratory. In that position, he was responsible for all Air Force research in the areas of manpower and personnel, education and training, simulation and training devices, and logistics. Earlier in his career, he commanded an Air Force recruiting squadron, was the chief of market research for Air Force recruiting, and was the deputy director for operations for Air Force recruiting. A fellow of the American Psychological Association, he is a past president of its Division of Military Psychology. He has a Ph.D. in industrial and organizational psychology from the Ohio State University. Nancy T. Tippins is president of the Selection Practice Group of Personnel Research Associates, Inc., in Arlington Heights, IL. She is responsible for the development and execution of the firm's strategies related to employee selection, assessment, and development. Prior to joining the firm, she spent over 20 years managing personnel research functions involved in selection methods, staffing policies and procedures, equal employment opportunity and affirmative action, outplacement and downsizing, human resource services, and surveys for GTE, Bell Atlantic, and Exxon Com- pany, USA. She has a Ph.D. in industrial and organizational psychology from the Georgia Institute of Technology. lohn T. Warner is professor of economics at Clemson University. He was a member of the 9th Quadrennial Review of Military Compensation with the Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness. He has written extensively on the topic of economic incentives and cost analysis in military recruitment with particular emphasis on the relative cost-effectiveness of various benefit packages (pay, bonuses, educational programs, etc.) on raising enlistments. He has a Ph.D. in economics with a minor in statistics from North Carolina State University.

OCR for page 179