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Biographical Sketches of the Committee

IRWIN H. ROSENBERG, M.D. (chair), is an internationally recognized leader in nutrition science. Dr. Rosenberg is a senior scientist at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging and dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University. He served for 15 years as the director of the Human Nutrition Research Center, which studies the interaction of aging and nutritional/dietary factors, as well as the way in which diet, nutrition, and physical activity can modulate or prevent degenerative diseases of aging. The focus of his research has been on vitamin metabolism, especially folate and cardiovascular disease, as well as stroke and cognitive decline. He receives research support from the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Foundation for Nutritional Advancement. As dean and professor, Dr. Rosenberg has been involved in nutrition and food policy issues ranging from dietary guidelines and reference intakes to international nutrition recommendations for the elderly. Prior to joining Tufts, Dr. Rosenberg held faculty positions at the Harvard Medical School and at the University of Chicago, where he served as the first director of the Clinical Nutrition Research Center and helped develop a nutritional focus within the field of gastroenterology. He has served on the Food and Drug Administration Food Advisory Committee’s Subcommittee on Folic Acid and on the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Subcommittee on Upper Reference Levels of Nutrients. He is a past chair of the Food and Nutrition Board. Among his many honors are the Josiah Macy Faculty Award, the Robert H. Herman Memorial Award of the American Society



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Dietary Reference Intakes: Guiding Principles for Nutrition Labeling and Fortification A Biographical Sketches of the Committee IRWIN H. ROSENBERG, M.D. (chair), is an internationally recognized leader in nutrition science. Dr. Rosenberg is a senior scientist at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging and dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University. He served for 15 years as the director of the Human Nutrition Research Center, which studies the interaction of aging and nutritional/dietary factors, as well as the way in which diet, nutrition, and physical activity can modulate or prevent degenerative diseases of aging. The focus of his research has been on vitamin metabolism, especially folate and cardiovascular disease, as well as stroke and cognitive decline. He receives research support from the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Foundation for Nutritional Advancement. As dean and professor, Dr. Rosenberg has been involved in nutrition and food policy issues ranging from dietary guidelines and reference intakes to international nutrition recommendations for the elderly. Prior to joining Tufts, Dr. Rosenberg held faculty positions at the Harvard Medical School and at the University of Chicago, where he served as the first director of the Clinical Nutrition Research Center and helped develop a nutritional focus within the field of gastroenterology. He has served on the Food and Drug Administration Food Advisory Committee’s Subcommittee on Folic Acid and on the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Subcommittee on Upper Reference Levels of Nutrients. He is a past chair of the Food and Nutrition Board. Among his many honors are the Josiah Macy Faculty Award, the Robert H. Herman Memorial Award of the American Society

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Dietary Reference Intakes: Guiding Principles for Nutrition Labeling and Fortification for Clinical Nutrition, and the Bristol Myers Squibb/Mead Johnson Award for Distinguished Achievement in Nutrition Research. He was elected to the IOM in 1994 and became a university professor at Tufts in 2001. He was chair of a March 2003 World Health Organization Consultation on Guidelines for Food Fortification. STEVEN A. ABRAMS, M.D., is a professor of pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine at the USDA/ARS Children’s Nutrition Research Center. He received a B.S. in biology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an M.D. from the Ohio State University College of Medicine. Dr. Abrams’ research centers on the metabolism of nutritionally important minerals, including calcium, magnesium, zinc, and iron. He is a member of numerous professional associations, including the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, the American Society for Clinical Nutrition, the American Society for Nutritional Sciences, and the Society for Pediatric Research, and he is a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Dr. Abrams served on the Dietary Reference Intakes Panel on Calcium and Related Nutrients and the Subcommittee on Upper Reference Levels of Nutrients. GARY R. BEECHER, Ph.D., recently retired as a research chemist of the Food Composition Laboratory at USDA’s Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center. He has over 30 years of professional research experience in the response of biological systems to dietary alterations and in the analytical chemistry of biological and food systems. Dr. Beecher’s recent work has been on the absorption and metabolism of dietary carotenoids. His group has also developed analytical techniques for food carotenoids and flavonoids, analyzed a wide variety of foods for these constituents, and compiled data into food composition databases for use by professionals and the public. Dr. Beecher was cochair of the Symposium on Healthy Diets and Food Trade: The Role of Food Composition Data at the International Congress of Nutrition in July 1997. He also served on the Dietary Reference Intakes Panel on Dietary Antioxidants and Related Compounds. CATHERINE M. CHAMPAGNE, Ph.D., R.D., is a professor-research and chief of Nutritional Epidemiology/Dietary Assessment and Counseling at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. She is also the coordinator of the Women’s Nutrition Research Program at Pennington. Dr. Champagne’s research includes the Delta Nutrition Intervention Research

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Dietary Reference Intakes: Guiding Principles for Nutrition Labeling and Fortification Initiative, dietary assessment and nutrient databases, nutritional changes promoting weight loss and improvement in chronic disease risk, intake of soldiers both during U.S. Army basic training and in field environments, and nutrient composition of domestic and foreign foods. She receives research support through the Pennington Center, primarily through the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Department of Defense, and other funding sources. Dr. Champagne is a fellow of the American Dietetic Association. She is also a member of the Institute of Food Technologists, the American Society for Nutritional Sciences, the American College of Sports Medicine, the American Heart Association, and the North American Association for the Study of Obesity. She has been an invited speaker at numerous workshops and other professional meetings. FERGUS M. CLYDESDALE, Ph.D., is a distinguished professor and chair of the Department of Food Science and Nutrition at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. His current research interests include physical-chemical changes in food processing, mineral-fiber interactions in foods, and technological optimization of physiological and functional properties and color-sensory interactions in foods. He receives research support from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Dr. Clydesdale has served on numerous committees, including the Keystone National Policy Dialogue on Food, Nutrition, and Health; the Food and Drug Administration Food Advisory Committee; and the Institute of Medicine’s Food and Nutrition Board (FNB); and is past chair of the FNB Food Forum. Dr. Clydesdale is a fellow of the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) and the American College of Nutrition. He is the recipient of many distinguished awards, including IFT’s highest honor, the Nicholas Appert Award; the University of Massachusetts Distinguished Teaching Award; and the Center for Applied Science Technology’s Charles A. Black Award for scientific communication. JEANNE P. GOLDBERG, Ph.D., R.D., is a professor of nutrition and director of the Center on Nutrition Communication and the Graduate Program in Nutrition Communication at the Tufts University Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Her research interests include communications strategies, health promotion, theory-based program interventions, mass media, and effective nutrition communication. Dr. Goldberg served as principal investigator on the study that led to the selection of the Food Guide Pyramid by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Department of

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Dietary Reference Intakes: Guiding Principles for Nutrition Labeling and Fortification Health and Human Services. She is currently the coprincipal investigator on a 5-year program intervention that promotes healthy life-styles in early elementary school children in diverse communities, with support from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. She is also coinvestigator on a 3-year intervention to prevent obesity in elementary school children with support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dr. Goldberg is a well-known consultant to the food industry and government on consumer issues. She receives some research support from Kraft, Ross Laboratories, Novartis Foundation, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for communication/website related projects. She served as a member of the Food and Drug Administration Food Advisory Committee from 1992 to 1996, is a trustee of the International Food Information Council Foundation, and is a member of the Advisory Board to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disorders Weight Information Network. For over 20 years she coauthored a biweekly newspaper column on nutrition, nationally syndicated by the Washington Post Writer’s Group. She also coauthored Dr. Jean Mayer’s Diet and Nutrition Guide. Dr. Goldberg received her Ph.D. from Tufts University. PENNY M. KRIS-ETHERTON, Ph.D., R.D., is distinguished professor of nutrition and ADA Plan V program director at the Pennsylvania State University. Her expertise is in the areas of diet and coronary heart disease risk factors and the nutritional regulation of lipoprotein and cholesterol metabolism. Dr. Kris-Etherton was a member of the Food and Nutrition Board Panel on Dietary Reference Intakes for Macronutrients. She is also a member of the American Dietetic Association (ADA); the American Society for Nutritional Sciences, where she serves as treasurer-elect; and the Society for Nutrition Education. She has served as the ADA representative to WOMENHEART and to the Nutrition Committee of the American Heart Association. Dr. Kris-Etherton is a recipient of the Lederle Award for Human Nutrition Research from the American Society for Nutritional Sciences and the Foundation Award for Excellence in Research from ADA. She is also the recipient of many substantial research support grants. JEROLD R. MANDE, M.P.H., is associate director for policy at the Yale Cancer Center. Prior to that he was director of policy programs at Yale University School of Medicine. He has also served as senior vice president for Strategy, Health Dialog, Inc. Between 1991 and

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Dietary Reference Intakes: Guiding Principles for Nutrition Labeling and Fortification 2000, Mr. Mande served in several executive branch senior positions, including Deputy Assistant Secretary for Occupational Safety and Health, U.S. Department of Labor; senior adviser in the Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the President; senior adviser and executive assistant to the Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA); and acting associate commissioner for legislative affairs at FDA. Prior to that he was the health and environment legislative assistant to Representative and then Senator Al Gore. Mr. Mande has received a number of awards for his work, including the Presidential Award for Design Excellence, in recognition of his lead role in designing the Nutrition Facts food label; the American Heart Association’s National Public Affairs Special Recognition Award for his work on FDA’s tobacco rule; and the FDA Commissioner’s Special Citation for his work on priority initiatives, including the food label, food safety, and the tobacco rule. Mr. Mande was a founding steering committee member of the National Dialogue on Cancer and cochaired its Leadership Forum on Obesity. Mr. Mande received his M.P.H. in nutrition and epidemiology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. GEORGE P. McCABE, Ph.D., is a professor of statistics and head of statistical consulting in the Department of Statistics at Purdue University. His current research interests include applied statistics (most recently related to vitamin A and iron nutriture), statistical computing, and statistics and the law. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and a member of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, the American Society for Quality, the New York Academy of Sciences, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is the coauthor of a widely used introductory statistical text and over 125 publications, ranging from statistical theory to a meta analysis comparing daily and weekly iron supplementation. FRANCES H. SELIGSON, Ph.D., R.D., is a consultant on food and nutrition issues and also serves as an adjunct associate professor with the Department of Nutritional Sciences, the Pennsylvania State University. She recently retired as associate director, Nutrition, at Hershey Foods Corporation. During her tenure at Hershey Foods, she also held positions of senior manager, Nutrition and Food Safety; manager, Nutrition and Food Safety; and manager, Nutrition Affairs. She earlier worked for the Procter and Gamble Company and was an assistant professor of nutrition at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Dr. Seligson’s professional memberships include the American Society for Nutritional Sciences and the

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Dietary Reference Intakes: Guiding Principles for Nutrition Labeling and Fortification American Dietetic Association. She has also held leadership positions on many committees and activities at such associations as the American Society for Nutritional Sciences, the International Food Information Council, the International Life Sciences Institute, and the National Food Processors Association. Dr. Seligson has published extensively in the areas of nutrition and food consumption. She is currently a consultant on scientific issues to Hershey Foods, and as such represents Hershey Foods on International Life Sciences Institute technical committees on dietary lipids, carbohydrates, energy, and life styles and weight management. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. VALERIE TARASUK, Ph.D., is an associate professor of the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto’s Department of Nutrition Sciences and Public Health Sciences. Her primary research interests are in domestic food insecurity and hunger and in dietary assessment. Her specialties within these areas are in social and economic determinates of health and nutrition, population-level indicators of risk, evaluation of public policies in response to food insecurity, and the statistical analysis of dietary intake data at the individual and population levels. In 2003 she received funding from the Canadian Institute of Health Research, the Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation, and the Dairy Farmers of Canada. Dr. Tarasuk has served on a number of committees and advisory groups, including Health Canada’s Expert Advisory Committee on Dietary Reference Intakes, the Nutrition Expert Advisory Group of the Canadian Community Health Survey, the External Advisory Panel for Food Directorate Review of Policies on the Addition of Vitamins and Minerals to Foods, and the Expert Scientific Workshop to Evaluate the Integrated National Food and Nutrition Survey. She chaired the Data Review Panels for the Prince Edward Island and Saskatchewan Nutrition Surveys. Dr. Tarasuk was a member of the Food and Nutrition Board Subcommittee on Interpretation and Uses of Dietary Reference Intakes. SUSAN WHITING, Ph.D., is a professor of nutrition at the College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan. She taught nutrition at Mount Saint Vincent University in Halifax prior to moving to the University of Saskatchewan, where she has taught in the Nutrition and Dietetics Program for 14 years. Dr. Whiting’s areas of expertise involve the safety and effectiveness of calcium supplements, the role of nutrition in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis, how nutrition affects bone development in children

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Dietary Reference Intakes: Guiding Principles for Nutrition Labeling and Fortification and young adults, dietary assessment methodology, and food policy with emphasis on socioeconomic factors and agricultural biotechnology. She receives research support from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, as well as from the private recipes grant-in-aid, Bioriginal Foods Inc., and the Dairy Farmers of Canada. She is a member of the Canadian Society for Nutritional Sciences and is serving as its president from 2002 to 2004. She is also a member of the American Society for Nutritional Sciences. Dr. Whiting holds membership in several other professional organizations, including the Dietitians of Canada and the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.