TABLE C-1 Dietary Reference Intakes: Estimated Average Requirements

Life Stage Group

Vitamin A (µg/d)a

Vitamin C (mg/d)

Vitamin E (mg/d)b

Thiamin (mg/d)

Riboflavin (mg/d)

Niacin (mg/d)c

Vitamin B6 (mg/d)

Folate (µg/d)d

Infants

 

7–12 mo

 

Children

 

1–3 y

210

13

5

0.4

0.4

5

0.4

120

4–8 y

275

22

6

0.5

0.5

6

0.5

160

Males

 

9–13 y

445

39

9

0.7

0.8

9

0.8

250

14–18 y

630

63

12

1.0

1.1

12

1.1

330

19–30 y

625

75

12

1.0

1.1

12

1.1

320

31–50 y

625

75

12

1.0

1.1

12

1.1

320

51–70 y

625

75

12

1.0

1.1

12

1.4

320

> 70 y

625

75

12

1.0

1.1

12

1.4

320

Females

 

9–13 y

420

39

9

0.7

0.8

9

0.8

250

14–18 y

485

56

12

0.9

0.9

11

1.0

330

19–30 y

500

60

12

0.9

0.9

11

1.1

320

31–50 y

500

60

12

0.9

0.9

11

1.1

320

51–70 y

500

60

12

0.9

0.9

11

1.3

320

> 70 y

500

60

12

0.9

0.9

11

1.3

320

Pregnancy

 

14–18 y

530

66

12

1.2

1.2

14

1.6

520

19–30 y

550

70

12

1.2

1.2

14

1.6

520

31–50 y

550

70

12

1.2

1.2

14

1.6

520

Lactation

 

14–18 y

880

96

16

1.2

1.3

13

1.7

450

19–30 y

900

100

16

1.2

1.3

13

1.7

450

31–50 y

900

100

16

1.2

1.3

13

1.7

450

NOTE: This table presents EARs, which serve two purposes: for assessing adequacy of population intakes and as the basis for calculating Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) for individuals for those nutrients. EARs have not been established for vitamin D, vitamin K, pantothenic acid, biotin, choline, calcium, chromium, fluoride, manganese, or other nutrients not yet evaluated via the DRI process.

a As retinol activity equivalents (RAE). 1 RAE = 1 μg retinol, 12 μg β-carotene, 24 μg α-carotene, or 24 μg β-cryptoxanthin. The RAE for dietary provitamin A carotenoids is twofold greater than retinol equivalents (RE), whereas the RAE for preformed vitamin A is the same as RE.

b As α-tocopherol. α-Tocopherol includes RRR-α-tocopherol, the only form of α-tocopherol that occurs naturally in foods, and the 2R-stereoisomeric forms of α-tocopherol (RRR-, RSR-, RRS-, and RSS-α-tocopherol) that occur in fortified foods and supplements. It does not include the 2S-stereoisomeric forms of α-tocopherol (SRR-, SSR-, SRS-, and SSS-α-tocopherol), also found in fortified foods and supplements.



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