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Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

Henrick J. Harwood is a vice president with The Lewin Group. He has over 20 years of experience studying the economic impacts of alcohol and drug abuse. Mr. Harwood recently served as the chair of the “Treatment Gap” expert panel for the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT) National Treatment Plan, is director of the CSAT funded practice research and evaluation network initiative for behavioral health professions, and served as the deputy director for the CSAT-funded National Evaluation, Data and Technical Assistance Center (NEDTAC). He has directed a number of studies examining the economic impacts of substance abuse and mental illness, including studies examining the relationship of substance use/abuse to labor market success (labor force participation, employment, wage rates), receipt of social welfare benefits, healthcare expenditures and other impacts (particularly impacts with externalities such as motor vehicle crashes and crime). Mr. Harwood has also managed several major evaluations of the costs and benefits of substance abuse treatment. Previously, he served as assistant deputy director for Treatment and Workplace Policy (Acting), and as senior policy analyst in the Office of National Drug Control Policy, Executive Office of the President. Mr. Harwood was on the Institute of Medicine staff where he was associate study director on the Substance Abuse Coverage Study and co-editor of Treating Drug Problems which is the most comprehensive analysis undertaken to date of the nation’s drug treatment system. Mr. Harwood began his career at the Research Triangle Institute in North Carolina, where he was the principal author of Economic Costs of Alcohol and Drug Abuse and Mental Illness—1980.



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New Treatments for Addiction: Behavioral, Ethical, Legal, and Social Questions J Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff Henrick J. Harwood is a vice president with The Lewin Group. He has over 20 years of experience studying the economic impacts of alcohol and drug abuse. Mr. Harwood recently served as the chair of the “Treatment Gap” expert panel for the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT) National Treatment Plan, is director of the CSAT funded practice research and evaluation network initiative for behavioral health professions, and served as the deputy director for the CSAT-funded National Evaluation, Data and Technical Assistance Center (NEDTAC). He has directed a number of studies examining the economic impacts of substance abuse and mental illness, including studies examining the relationship of substance use/abuse to labor market success (labor force participation, employment, wage rates), receipt of social welfare benefits, healthcare expenditures and other impacts (particularly impacts with externalities such as motor vehicle crashes and crime). Mr. Harwood has also managed several major evaluations of the costs and benefits of substance abuse treatment. Previously, he served as assistant deputy director for Treatment and Workplace Policy (Acting), and as senior policy analyst in the Office of National Drug Control Policy, Executive Office of the President. Mr. Harwood was on the Institute of Medicine staff where he was associate study director on the Substance Abuse Coverage Study and co-editor of Treating Drug Problems which is the most comprehensive analysis undertaken to date of the nation’s drug treatment system. Mr. Harwood began his career at the Research Triangle Institute in North Carolina, where he was the principal author of Economic Costs of Alcohol and Drug Abuse and Mental Illness—1980.

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New Treatments for Addiction: Behavioral, Ethical, Legal, and Social Questions Alexander M. Capron is the director of ethics and health for the World Health Organization. From 1985 to 2002, he served as professor of law and medicine, and co-director of the Pacific Center for Health Policy and Ethics at the University of Southern California. He specializes in legal-medical issues and biomedical ethics. Appointed by President Clinton, he served as a member of the National Bioethics Advisory Commission. Professor Capron was executive director of the President’s Commission for the Study of Ethical Problems in Medicine and Biomedical and Behavioral Research and chair of the Biomedical Ethics Advisory Committee of the U.S. Congress. He also serves on the board of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. Professor Capron chaired the Board of Advisors of the American Board of Internal Medicine and served on the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee at the National Institutes of Health and on various panels at the Institute of Medicine. His recent publications include Law, Science, and Medicine, “Stem Cells: Ethics, Law, and Politics,” and Treatise on Health Care Law. Jonathan P. Caulkins is professor of operations research and public policy at the Heinz School of Public Policy and Management of Carnegie Mellon University. His research focuses on modeling and analyzing problems pertaining to drugs, crime, and violence, and how policies affect those problems. He has testified before Congress and a variety of state legislatures on the effectiveness of various drug control programs and agencies and has briefed senior policy makers at the federal, state, and local level on issues pertaining to drug and crime control. Dr. Caulkins has served as a judge and a member of the advisory board of the International Mathematical Contest in Modeling; a member of the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematicians’ Visiting Lecturer Program. He earned a master’s degree in electrical engineering and computer science and a doctorate in operations research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. James W. Cornish is a psychiatrist at the Philadelphia Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center and associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania. Since 1988, he has conducted numerous pharmacotherapy trials involving people dependent upon alcohol, cocaine, opioids and nicotine. He participated on the NIDA-sponored clinical trial of Depotrex® brand depot naltrexone for opioid dependent persons. Dr. Cornish also assisted with the planning of a phase II cocaine vaccine trial at Penn. He is the director for the Center’s Pharmacotherapy Division and is the chairperson for the Research and Development Committee at the VA. Dr. Cornish his M.D. from Thomas Jefferson Medical College. He did residencies in general surgery at Bryn Mawr Hospital and psychiatry at Norristown State Hospital. He also completed a fellowship in adminis-

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New Treatments for Addiction: Behavioral, Ethical, Legal, and Social Questions trative psychiatry at Norristown. Prior to coming to Penn, Dr. Cornish spent six years with the Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies. He was associate medical direct or at McNeil Pharmaceuticals and later director of Psychiatric Medications at Janssen Pharmaceutica. Dr. Cornish had received a NIDA Scientist Career Development Award for Clinicians, is currently the principal investigator for a NIDA-funded study (RO1) entitled “Naltrexone Treatment of Opioid Dependent Parolees” and for a depot naltrexone study in a recently funded NIDA (P60) Center grant. Lewis E. Gallant is the executive director of the National Association of State Alcohol and Drug Abuse Directors, Inc. (NASADAD). He had served as president of NASADAD since 1999 and for the prior two years as first vice president. Dr. Gallant came to NASADAD from the Virginia Department of Mental Health, Mental Retardation and Substance Abuse Services (DMHMRSAS), where he held the position of director of the Office of Substance Abuse Services. He was responsible for promoting, monitoring and evaluating the office’s service programs relating to the prevention and treatment of substance abuse problems, and for coordinating such programs within DMHMRSAS and with other public, private and community-based organizations. He earned a Ph.D. in social work, with an emphasis on human services administration at the University of Texas, Arlington. Shirley Y. Hill is professor of psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, with a joint appointment in the departments of psychology and human genetics. Her career has been focused on etiological factors in addiction. Dr. Hill has been a consultant to the World Health Organization, Program on Substance Abuse, served as a consultant to the NIH Division of Research Grants Advisory Committee, and has served on a number of NIH Initial Review Groups (IRG). She has been a member of the Graduate Faculty University of Pittsburgh since 1990 and was a visiting professor (Spinoza Chair) at the University of Amsterdam, Faculty of Medicine in 1994. Dr. Hill serves on the editorial board of Journal of Studies on Alcohol and is a member of several research societies including American Psychopathological Association, International Society for Biomedical Research on Alcoholism, Research Society on Alcoholism, Sigma Xi Scientific Honorary, Society of Biological Psychiatry, Society for Psychophysiological Research and the American College of Neuropharmacology (ACNP). Currently, she is an ACNP Fellow and member of two ACNP committees, Education and Training, and Ethics. She obtained her early training in neurobiology, medicine, and research methodology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

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New Treatments for Addiction: Behavioral, Ethical, Legal, and Social Questions Martin Y. Iguchi is a senior behavioral scientist and director of the Drug Policy Research Center at RAND, located in Santa Monica, CA. Dr. Iguchi is a member of CSAT’s National Advisory Council, NIDA’s Center Grant Research Review Committee, the board of directors of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence, and of the editorial board for Drug and Alcohol Dependence. Currently, Dr. Iguchi is a principal investigator on three NIDA treatment research grants, an Robert Wood Johnson grant to examine the impact of Proposition 36 in Orange County, CA., a sub-contract with UCLA to conduct a cost outcome analysis for a multi-site methamphetamine treatment study, and he also serves as principal investigator for the Ford Foundation grant that supports the RAND Drug Policy Research Center. Dr. Iguchi received his Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology from Boston University, and he completed 2 years of post-doctoral training in drug abuse and behavioral pharmacology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Thomas R. Kosten is a professor of psychiatry and medicine at Yale University Medical School and deputy chief of psychiatry at VA Connecticut. He has been supported by a research scientist award from the National Institute of Health since 1987 and directs the Yale Medications Development Center for substance abuse. He has served on national and international review groups for medications development in substance abuse. He is the vice chair for Added Qualifications in Addiction Psychiatry of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. He is a fellow in the American Psychiatric Association and the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, and past president of the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry. He has several major awards for clinical research, and has been on the editorial boards of the major journals in substance abuse as well as the American Journal of Psychiatry. From his studies in substance dependence, post traumatic stress disorder, and neuroimaging he has published over 300 papers, books and reviews. Recent work includes developing a cocaine vaccine, buprenorphine for opioid dependence, and using combined medications with contingency management for opioid and cocaine dependence. Joseph O. Merrill is an attending physician at Harborview Medical Center and associate professor of medicine at the University of Washington. His current research interest is with Methadone maintenance in primary care settings. Dr. Merrill is a member of the Society of General Internal Medicine and the American Society of Addiction Medicine. He has an M.D. from Yale University School of Medicine and an M.P.H. from the University of Washington, School of Public Health.

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New Treatments for Addiction: Behavioral, Ethical, Legal, and Social Questions Tracy G. Myers serves as a Senior Project Officer with the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education with the National Research Council (NRC). Prior to joining the NRC, he worked at Westat, Inc., on experimental and quasi-experimental evaluations of human services programs targeted toward children and their families. His areas of interest include risk and protective factors that affect child and adolescent health and psychopathology, psychological assessment, minority mental health, and program evaluation. At the NRC, he is directing a study on behavioral, ethical, legal, and social issues associated with immunotherapies (e.g., vaccines and monoclonal antibodies) and sustained-release formulations for treating drug addiction; overseeing a workshop on the behavioral, ethical, legal and social issues associated with genetic information on who is and is not genetically susceptible to drug addiction; and directing a study to revamp the National Institute on Aging’s research program in social psychology, adult development, and personality psychology. He has a PhD in clinical/community psychology from the University of Maryland, College Park. Michael Owens is a professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology in the College of Medicine at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) in Little Rock, AR. He received his Ph.D. in experimental pathology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and completed post-doctoral training in pharmacokinetics and therapeutics at the University of Arizona in Tucson. Since 1985, his medical research program has been continuously funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and from 1986-1997 he was the recipient of a prestigious Research Career Development Award from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. From 2001-2002 he was the director of the Arkansas Biosciences Institute. His research interests are very broad including antibody-based medications development, experimental therapeutics, drug abuse and agrimedicine. He is currently developing monoclonal antibody-based medications for use in treating phencyclidine and methamphetamine abuse. In recognition of his research and academic accomplishments at UAMS, he was awarded a Wilbur D. Mills Endowed Chair in Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention in 2001. Charles R. Schuster is an internationally recognized researcher on the psychopharmacology of drugs of abuse. From 1986-1992, Dr. Schuster served as the director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). In 1992, Dr. Schuster returned to his research career as a senior research scientist at the Addiction Research Center of NIDA. In 1995, he was appointed as a professor in the department of psychiatry and behavioral neurosciences at Wayne State University School of Medicine and the

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New Treatments for Addiction: Behavioral, Ethical, Legal, and Social Questions director of the Clinical Research Division on Substance Abuse. He is currently director of the Addiction Research Institute at Wayne State University. Dr. Schuster has authored or co-authored over 200 scientific journal articles, as well as numerous book chapters and several books. He has served on the FDA Drug Abuse Advisory Committee and is also a member of the Expert Advisory Panel on Drug Dependence of the World Health Organization. Dr. Schuster’s primary research interests include the development of medications and behavioral interventions for the treatment of tobacco, cocaine and heroin dependence; the laboratory evaluation of new medications for their abuse potential; the role of co-morbid psychiatric disorders in the etiology and maintenance of drug dependence; and the relationship between co-morbid psychiatric disorders and the nature and intensity of the cocaine withdrawal syndrome. Zili Sloboda is currently an adjunct research professor in the department of sociology and senior research associate at the Institute for Health and Social Policy of the University of Akron. She was awarded a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in November 1999 to review and enhance the middle and high school substance abuse prevention program being delivered through the Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.) network and in February 2001, to conduct a national five-year evaluation of the combined effects of the new program. She also serves as a consultant to the United Nations Drug Policy Programme’s Global Assessment Programme. From 1987 until 1998, Dr. Sloboda headed a program of research grants at the National Institute on Drug Abuse. She served as the director of the Division Epidemiology and Prevention Research from 1993 until 1998. She was trained as a medical sociologist at New York University and as an epidemiologist at the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. Her research has included epidemiological studies of drug abuse in New York City; evaluations of drug abuse treatment programs; health services research relative to the utilization of a geriatrics program, of dental services, and of a community-based hospital; and prevention research focusing on comprehensive community programs for sickle cell screening and for cancer. She has published in the areas of drug abuse, cancer prevention, and AIDS prevention. Kathryn E. Stein is the vice president for product development and regulatory affairs at MacroGenics, Inc., in Rockville, Maryland. Prior to joining MacroGenics, she was the director of the Division of Monoclonal Antibodies (DMA), Office of Therapeutics Research and Review, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER), FDA and acting chief, Laboratory of Molecular and Developmental Immunology, DMA from 1992-2002. She joined CBER in 1980 as a senior staff fellow and became a senior

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New Treatments for Addiction: Behavioral, Ethical, Legal, and Social Questions investigator in 1985 and chief of the Laboratory of Molecular and Developmental Biology in the Division of Bacterial Products in 1991. Dr. Stein received her B.A. in chemistry from Bard College and her Ph.D. in micro-biology and immunology from Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Dr. Stein received the National Research Service Award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for post-doctoral studies at Harvard with Dr. Harvey Cantor and at the NIH with Dr. William Paul prior to her joining CBER. Ellen M. Weber is an assistant professor of Law at the University of Maryland School of Law. Prior to joining the law school, Ms. Weber was an attorney with the Legal Action Center, a non-profit law and policy organization that specializes in drug, alcohol, AIDS and criminal justice issues. She worked as staff counsel and later started the Center’s National Policy office in Washington, DC. Most recently, Ms. Weber served as the Center’s Senior Vice President for Law. During her seventeen-year tenure with the Center, Ms. Weber developed and ran precedent-setting litigation protecting the civil rights and privacy of people with addiction and criminal justice histories and HIV disease and the agencies that serve them. She advised the Administration on drug, alcohol and AIDS policy, worked closely with congressional staff to shape legislation on appropriations, civil rights protections for individuals with disabilities, health care reform, confidentiality and other issues and testified extensively before Congress on these issues. Ms. Weber obtained her J.D. from New York University School of Law.