Aggravated Assault

Robbery

Property Crimes

Auto Theft

Burglary

Larceny

1.14

1.33

0.72

1.14

0.76

0.89

2.77

3.34

1.89

2.59

2.29

2.27

6.6

7.5

5.1

6.5

5.7

5.7

NOTES: Shaded cells indicate a positive coefficient estimate and * indicates the estimate is statistically significant at the 5% significance level. Unless otherwise noted, the standard errors are not adjusted for state-level clustering. Exceptions: Duggan, Plassmann and Tideman, Ayres and Donohue.

Aggravated Assault

Robbery

Property Crimes

Auto Theft

Burglary

Larceny

–1*

–3*

–1*

0*

–2*

0

–3*

–3*

–2*

–3*

–1*

–2*

10*

–3

0

0

–3

0

–2

–1

0

0

0

1

6*

4

–1

9*

4*

5*

–3*

–4*

0

–2*

–3*

–2*

–2

–3*

0

0

–2

–1

–1

–2

0

0

–1

0

NOTES: Shaded cells indicate a positive coefficient estimate and * indicates the estimate is statistically significant at the 5% significance level. Unless otherwise noted, the standard errors are not adjusted for state-level clustering. Exceptions: Duggan, Plassmann and Tideman, Ayres and Donohue.

cant decreases. In summary, according to Black and Nagin, adoption of a right-to-carry law may increase, decrease, or have no discernible effect on the crime rate depending on the crime and the state that are involved.8

8  

To avoid selection problems associated with using counties with positive crime rates, Black and Nagin also restricted their analysis to counties with populations of 100,000 or more. This was done to mitigate a possible bias arising from Lott’s use of the arrest rate as an explanatory variable. The arrest rate is the number of arrests divided by the number of crimes



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