Critical periods, 39, 50–51

early programming, 52–53

in fetal development, 58

Culture, 24–25

acculturation effects, 143, 145, 202

concepts of children and children’s health, 28–29

definition, 81, 143

family beliefs, 68

family learning environment, 72

health measurement considerations, 43, 81–83, 108, 118, 142–146, 200, 202

parenting style, 71

research needs, 209

treatment compliance and, 57

Cupping, 82

Current Population Survey, 133, 135, 143

Cystic fibrosis, 49, 85

Cytomegalovirus, 62

Data collection

on access to care, 152, 153

access to data, 9–10, 168–169, 178–180, 189–191, 203, 204, 205

assessing effectiveness of health services, 150, 151–152, 153

on behavioral influences on health, 124–129

on biological influences on health, 118–124

biological samples, 121–123, 124, 180–182

on built environment, 131–133

on child functioning, 103, 113, 199

clinical data, inadequacies in, 98–100, 102– 103, 136

on community influences on health, 100–101, 137–142

competing stakeholder interests in, 185

confidentiality in, 9–10, 109, 176–178

creating profiles and integrative measures of health, 104–106, 154–155, 158–159, 165

on cultural factors, 43, 81–83, 108, 118, 142–146, 200, 202

current system, 1, 12, 21, 26–27, 91–101, 193, 199

discrimination effects, 146–149

environmental factors, 8–9, 199–200, 203–204

family factors, 133–137

future prospects, 124, 209

geographic variation, 8–9, 203–204

on health conditions, 102–103

on health potential, 103–104, 199

health-related quality of life, 105

informed consent issues, 178–179

infrastructure for, 183–185

investigator-initiated surveys, 95–96, 126

to monitor health policy outcomes, 25, 149–150, 155–162

national data syntheses, 97–98

newborn screen testing, 120, 180–181

as ongoing effort, 159–160

on positive factors, 114, 118

proxy respondents, 107

rationale, 165–166, 192–193

recommendations for, 5–9, 196–204

on referrals from primary care to specialists, 154

reliability and validity, 107–109

security concerns, 179–180

standardization, 10–11, 182–183, 204–205, 206, 207–208

state and local government role in, 206–208

on subgroup disparities, 8, 118, 201–202

survey methodology, inadequacies in, 95, 96–97, 102–103, 109, 110, 117–118

terminology, 165

toxin exposure, 120–121, 129–130

See also Measurement system for children’s health;

State and local data collection

Data element, defined, 165

Data system, defined, 165

Dataset, defined, 165

David and Lucile Packard Foundation, 100

Definition and framework for children’s health, 12, 13–14, 17, 18, 19–20, 26

conceptual model of health, 37–38, 41–43

cultural variation, 24–25

current conceptualizations, 32–33

domains of health, 4, 6, 33–37, 195, 199

historical and conceptual development, 28–32

implications for measurement, 13–14, 197–198

policy development and, 160–161

recommendations, 3–5, 194–196

Department of Health and Human Services, 5–6, 9, 10, 196–197, 203, 204–205

Depression, 69

parental, 72–73

Developing a Daddy Survey, 96

Development, 12

assessing discrimination effects, 146–147

behavioral adaptation in, 54–55, 127



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement