Appendix G
Biographical Sketches of the Committee’s Members

COMMITTEE ON ATLANTIC SALMON IN MAINE

M. T. CLEGG (Chair) is a professor of genetics at the University of California, Riverside. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of California, Davis. He is a leading student of the evolution of complex genetic systems and is recognized internationally for his contributions to understanding the genetic and ecological basis for adaptive evolutionary changes within populations and at higher taxonomic levels. His research interests include the population genetics of plants, plant molecular evolution, and genetic conservation in agriculture. He has served on many U.S. national committees, NRC committees, and oversight groups, including the Commission on Life Sciences. He is a member and foreign secretary of the National Academy of Sciences.

PAUL K. BARTEN is an associate professor at the University of Massachusetts Department of Natural Resources Conservation. He is currently a Bullard Fellow in Forest Research at Harvard University (2003–2004). He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. His research interests include forest and wetland hydrology, woody debris dynamics in riparian and lotic ecosystems, pathways and mechanisms of non-point-source pollution, retrospective modeling of water and sediment yield, and conservation planning for watershed management. He was a member of the National Research Council Committee to Review New York



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Atlantic Salmon in Maine Appendix G Biographical Sketches of the Committee’s Members COMMITTEE ON ATLANTIC SALMON IN MAINE M. T. CLEGG (Chair) is a professor of genetics at the University of California, Riverside. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of California, Davis. He is a leading student of the evolution of complex genetic systems and is recognized internationally for his contributions to understanding the genetic and ecological basis for adaptive evolutionary changes within populations and at higher taxonomic levels. His research interests include the population genetics of plants, plant molecular evolution, and genetic conservation in agriculture. He has served on many U.S. national committees, NRC committees, and oversight groups, including the Commission on Life Sciences. He is a member and foreign secretary of the National Academy of Sciences. PAUL K. BARTEN is an associate professor at the University of Massachusetts Department of Natural Resources Conservation. He is currently a Bullard Fellow in Forest Research at Harvard University (2003–2004). He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. His research interests include forest and wetland hydrology, woody debris dynamics in riparian and lotic ecosystems, pathways and mechanisms of non-point-source pollution, retrospective modeling of water and sediment yield, and conservation planning for watershed management. He was a member of the National Research Council Committee to Review New York

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Atlantic Salmon in Maine City’s Watershed Management Strategy (1997–1999). He also serves as co-chair of the Quabbin Science and Technical Advisory Committee for the largest component of the metropolitan Boston system water supply. IAN A. FLEMING is an associate professor of diadromous and marine fish ecology at the Hatfield Marine Science Center of Oregon State University. He is also adjunct professor at the Norwegian Institute for Nature Research in Trondheim, Norway, where he worked for a decade before moving to Oregon in 2001. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Toronto. His research integrates perspectives from ecology and evolution with fishery and conservation biology and his areas of expertise include salmonid behavioral and evolutionary ecology, reproduction, life history, maternal effects, and population biology. He has written extensively on interactions of hatchery and farm salmon with wild salmon in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. He currently serves on the Northwest Power Planning Council’s Artificial Propagation Assessment Committee and is a member of several professional societies, including the Society for the Study of Evolution, the International Society for Behavioral Ecology, and the American and British Fisheries Societies. MART R. GROSS is a professor of conservation biology at the University of Toronto. He earned his Ph.D. in biology from the University of Utah and was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Washington and a professor from 1982 to 1987 at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia. He has been at the University of Toronto since 1987. His research focuses on the conservation biology of fishes through the study of their evolution, ecology, behavior, and genetics. His current research includes colonization of the Great Lakes by exotic Pacific salmon (Chinook and coho), colonization of Chile by introduced salmonids, evaluation of the Living Gene Bank Program for wild steelhead in British Columbia, and development of alternative breeding designs for maintaining genetic quality in captive fish populations. He has published extensively on Atlantic salmon and Pacific salmon conservation issues involving hatcheries and fish farms. In addition to his university position, Dr. Gross is appointed by the Canadian government to the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) as co-chair of Marine Fishes. LEWIS S. INCZE is a senior research scientist at the University of Southern Maine Bioscience Research Institute in Portland, Maine. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Washington. His research interests include coupled biological-physical interactions in the oceans; their effects on the spatial and temporal patterns of upper trophic level production; recruitment interactions between organisms, such as feeding relation-

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Atlantic Salmon in Maine ships; and climate forcing of system change. His current research is focused on the production dynamics and transport of larval lobsters in the Gulf of Maine; the quantitative relationships between larval supply, settlement, and fisheries recruitment; and the ecology of larval cod relative to prey populations, mixing, and transport on the Georges Bank. Dr. Incze was a research scientist at the Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences from 1987 to 2002 and was laboratory director from 1991 through 1995. He currently serves as chief scientist for the Gulf of Maine Area Program of the Census of Marine Life. ANNE R. KAPUSCINSKI is a professor of fisheries and conservation biology at the University of Minnesota. She is also the director of the Institute for Social, Economic, and Ecological Sustainability as well as director for the MacArthur Interdisciplinary Program on Global Change, Sustainability, and Justice. Dr. Kapuscinski earned her Ph.D. from Oregon State University. Her research interests include understanding the influence of genetic makeup on long-term sustainability and the evolutionary potential of managed populations of fish and shellfish. Recent research projects include a comparison of 20-year trends in genetic diversity and productivity in steelhead trout populations based on analysis of DNA polymorphisms; performance evaluations of different walleye populations in the same lakes; examination of genetic effects of hatchery rainbow trout on naturalized steelhead populations by testing survival of pure and hybrid crosses in isolated stream reaches; and testing population effects of gene flow from growth-enhanced transgenic fish to wild relatives. She has served on a number of national and international committees, including the NRC’s Committee on Protection and Management of Pacific Northwest Anadromous Salmonids and the NRC’s Committee on Biological Confinement of Genetically Engineered Organisms. She received a USDA Secretary of Agriculture Honor Award (1997) and a Pew Fellowship in Marine Conservation (2001) for her linkage of science to public policy regarding aquatic biotechnology and fish genetic conservation. BARBARA NEIS is a professor at the Memorial University of Newfoundland’s Department of Sociology in St. John’s and co-director of Safety-Net, a Community Research Alliance on Health and Safety in Marine and Coastal Work. Her research efforts have focused on the Newfoundland and Labrador fisheries and she has recently begun linking that research with international fisheries-related developments. Her current research interests include the health impacts of restructuring in the Newfoundland and Labrador fisheries and local ecological knowledge and science. She has conducted research on many different aspects of the Newfoundland Fishery including gender relations, occupational health, technologi-

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Atlantic Salmon in Maine cal change, industrial restructuring, social movements, and fisheries ecology. PATRICK O’BRIEN is a consulting environmental scientist with Chevron-Texaco Energy Technology Company in Richmond, California. He has a Ph.D. in ecology from the University of California, Irvine. Dr. O’Brien has expertise in the following areas: environmental impact assessment, endangered species, conservation planning, ecological risk assessment, wetlands permitting and management, natural resource damage assessment, habitat restoration, and the environmental elements of oil spill contingency planning and response. He served as a member of the NRC’s Committee on Scientific Issues in the Endangered Species Act and is a member of the NRC’s Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. NILS RYMAN is a professor at Stockholm University. He is a population geneticist whose research has focused on salmon. More specifically, his research focuses on problems related to the intraspecific genetic structure of natural populations, their evolutionary and reproductive relationships, and the factors determining the amount and distribution of genetic variation among them. His particular attention is directed toward conservation genetics and the genetic effects of human impacts on natural populations. Dr. Ryman has published papers on the genetic effects of escaped hatchery fish into natural populations. PETER E. SMOUSE is the chairman of the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources at Rutgers University. He earned his Ph.D. from North Carolina State University. His research interests include biometrics and population theory, spanning the fields of genetics, ecology, demography, epidemiology, anthropology, and systematics. He has served on a number of committees and panels including the Committee to Study Quantitative Genetics and Common Diseases, NIH, 1978; Population Biology and Physiological Ecology Panel, NSF 1980–83; NRC Ad Hoc Committee to Study Endangered Amphibians, 1990; DNA Subcommittee, New York State Forensic Commission 1995–98; U.S. National Committee—IUBS 1995–98; Population Biology Panel—Dissertation Grants, NSF 1998; Advisory Committee—Columbia Earth Institute 1998; and the Scientific Advisory Board, Cooperative Institute Fisheries Molecular Biology (FISHTEC) 1998–2001. JENNIFER L. SPECKER is a professor of oceanography at the University of Rhode Island. She earned her Ph.D. in Fisheries and Wildlife from Oregon State University. She is a fish endocrinologist specializing in the developmental endocrinology of Pacific and Atlantic salmon, the meta-

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Atlantic Salmon in Maine morphosis of flounder, the reproductive biology of commercially important marine fishes, the endocrine regulation of the gut and gills during adaptation, and vitellogenins and mouthbrooding in African cichlids. She has published scientific papers on the parr-smolt transformation of anadromous salmon, including “Parr-smolt transformation in Atlantic salmon: Thyroid hormone deiodination in liver and brain and endocrine correlates of change in rheotactic behavior.” She participated in the series of Workshops on Salmonid Smoltification from 1977 to 1992, co-editing the proceedings of the last one, which appeared in the journal Aquaculture. ROBERT R. STICKNEY is the Sea Grant College Program director and professor at Texas A&M University Department of Oceanography. He earned his Ph.D. from the Florida State University. His professional interests include aquaculture and fishery science. He has written extensively on the history of aquaculture in the United States and on sustainable aquaculture. He is past president of the World Aquaculture Society and the Fish Culture Section of the American Fisheries Society. He edits the journal Reviews in Fisheries Science. JON G. SUTINEN is a professor at the University of Rhode Island Department of Environmental and Natural Resource Economics. He earned his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Washington. His primary research interests are fisheries management and regulation with an emphasis on compliance and enforcement. He has extensive experience in international fisheries, including those in Latin America, Africa, Southeast Asia, and Europe. Most of this experience involved conducting research and supplying advice on fisheries policy. His current research focuses on several bioeconomic aspects of New England marine fisheries and the Northeast Large Marine Ecosystem. Dr. Sutinen was the founding editor of the journal Marine Resource Economics and served in that role for over a decade. He is a member of the NRC’s Ocean Studies Board.

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