References

[1] Victor Cook (NSF). NSF Management and Oversight of LIGO. Large Facility Projects Best Practices Workshop (NSF), Sept. 21, 2001.

[2] LIGO chronology. LIGO Press & Media Kit. Available at <http://www.ligo.caltech.edu/LIGO_web/PR/scripts/chrono.html>.

[3] Jeffrey Mervis. Funding of two science labs revives pork barrel vs. peer review debate. The Scientist 5[23]:0, Nov. 25, 1991.

[4] Robert Buderi. Going after gravity: How a high-risk project got funded. The Scientist 2[17]:1.

[5] Malcolm W. Brown. Experts clash over project to detect gravity wave. New York Times, April 30, 1991, p. C1.

[6] FY 1992-FY 1993 National Science Foundation authorization. Hearing before the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, March 13, 1991. CIS-NO: 91-H701-51.

[7] M. Mitchell Waldrop. Of politics, pulsars, death spirals—and LIGO. Science 249:1106-1108.

[8] NRC Physics Survey Committee, Physics Through the 1990s: A Summary. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 1986.

[9] Rick Boucher. Introduction of National Science Foundation authorization act amendments of 1991. Congressional Record, Vol. 137, No. 70, May 9, 1991.

[10] John Travis. LIGO: A $250 million gamble. Science 260:612-614.

[11] Christopher Anderson. LIGO director out in shakeup. Science 263:1366.

[12] William T. Broad. Big science squeezes small-scale researchers. New York Times, December 29, 1992, p. C1.

[13] Robert Irion. LIGO’s mission of gravity. Science 288:420-423.

[14] LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC) available at <www.ligo.org>. (Official LIGO website: <www.ligo.caltech.edu>.)

[15] W. Wayt Gibbs. Ripples in spacetime. Scientific American 28:62.

[16] Correspondence with Barry Barish, who consulted with Rainer Weiss and Kip Thorne.

NEES (GEORGE E. BROWN, JR. NETWORK FOR EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING SIMULATION)

Description

The George E. Brown, Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) will be a geographically distributed national network of shared experimental earthquake engineering research equipment sites linked by a high-performance Internet system; it will consist of three major components:

  • Next-generation earthquake engineering research equipment (such as shake tables, a tsunami wave basin, geotechnical centrifuges, large-scale laboratory facilities, and mobile and permanently installed field equipment) distributed around the country at 15 universities.

  • NEESgrid, a high-performance network that will connect the remote sites and enable remote equipment operation and experimental viewing,



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