Appendixes



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 51
Setting Priorities for Large Research Facility Projects Supported by the National Science Foundation Appendixes

OCR for page 51
Setting Priorities for Large Research Facility Projects Supported by the National Science Foundation This page intentionally left blank.

OCR for page 51
Setting Priorities for Large Research Facility Projects Supported by the National Science Foundation Appendix A Committee and Professional Staff Biographical Information William F. Brinkman [NAS] (Chair) is a senior research physicist in the Physics Department at Princeton University. He retired as vice president, research, from Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey, on September 30, 2001. In that position, his responsibilities included the direction of all research to enable the advancement of the technology underlying Lucent Technologies’ products. He received his B.S. and Ph.D. in physics from the University of Missouri in 1960 and 1965, respectively. He joined Bell Laboratories in 1966 after spending a year as a National Science Foundation postdoctoral fellow at Oxford University. In 1972, he became head of the Infrared Physics and Electronics Research Department, and in 1974 director of the Chemical Physics Research Laboratory. He held the position of director of the Physical Research Laboratory from 1981 until he moved to Sandia in 1984. He was vice president of Sandia National Laboratories from 1984 until 1987. At that point, he returned to Bell Laboratories to become executive director of the Physics Research Division. In 1993, he became physical sciences research vice president and in January 2000 vice president, research at Bell Laboratories. He is a member of the American Philosophical Society, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has served on a number of National Academies Committees, including chairmanship of COSEPUP’s study on NSF’s Science and Technology Centers and the National Research Council’s Physics Survey Committee and the Committee on Solid-State Sciences. He served as a member of COSEPUP

OCR for page 51
Setting Priorities for Large Research Facility Projects Supported by the National Science Foundation and the NAS Council. He is past president of the American Physical Society and is chairman of the Laboratories Operations Board of the US Department of Energy. Dr. Brinkman was the recipient of the 1994 George E. Pake Prize. David H. Auston [NAS, NAE] is president of the Kavli Foundation and the Kavli Institute in Oxnard, California. His career encompasses experience in industry and higher education. He has been a member of the technical staff and department head at AT&T’s Bell Laboratories, professor of electrical engineering and applied physics and dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science at Columbia University, provost of Rice University, and president of Case Western Reserve University. Dr. Auston has contributed to research in lasers, nonlinear optics, and solid-state materials. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, the Optical Society of America, and the American Physical Society. A native of Toronto, Canada, Dr. Auston earned a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in engineering physics and electrical engineering from the University of Toronto and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Persis S. Drell is professor and director of research at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University. She received her B.A. in mathematics and physics from Wellesley College in 1977. She received her Ph.D. in atomic physics from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1983 with a precision measurement of parity violation in atomic thallium. She then switched to high-energy experimental physics and worked as a postdoctoral scientist with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on the Mark II experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). She joined the faculty of the Physics Department at Cornell University in 1988, and there her research focused primarily on experiments at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, an electron-positron colliding-beam facility. In 2000, she became head of the Cornell high-energy group; in 2001, she was named deputy director of Cornell’s Laboratory of Nuclear Studies. In 2002, Dr. Drell accepted a position as professor and director of research at the SLAC. While at Cornell, Dr. Drell studied charm and bottom quarks in an effort to measure the fundamental characteristics of the weak interaction. While on sabbatical in 1998, supported by a fellowship from the Guggenheim Foundation, she formed a collaboration with several members of the Cornell Astronomy Department to perform a critical study of type Ia supernovae and their utility as cosmologic distance markers. In addition to the Guggenheim fellowship, Dr. Drell has been the recipient

OCR for page 51
Setting Priorities for Large Research Facility Projects Supported by the National Science Foundation of a National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award, and she is a fellow of the American Physical Society. Alan Dressler [NAS] is an astronomer and member of the scientific staff at the Observatories of the Carnegie Institution in Pasadena, California. He received a B.A. in physics at the University of California (UC), Berkeley and his Ph.D. in astronomy and astrophysics from UC, Santa Cruz. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Astronomical Society (AAS), and the International Astronomical Union. Dr. Dressler is an expert in optical studies of galaxies and clusters of galaxies and in the large-scale structure of the universe. His three main subjects of research are the birth and evolution of galaxies; mapping the dark-matter distribution through the peculiar motions of galaxies, leading to the discovery of the “Great Attractor”; and the properties of massive black holes at the centers of galaxies. Dr. Dressler is also the principal investigator of Inamori Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph (IMACS), a giant wide-field spectrograph for the Magellan 6.5-m telescope. His scientific research is widely recognized, and he is active in public outreach. He won the AAS Pierce Prize in 1983. He served on the 1991 National Research Council Astronomy and Astrophysics Survey Committee Panel on Policy Opportunities and the Task Group on Space Astronomy and Astrophysics’s Panel on Galaxies and Stellar Systems. He chaired the Optical-IR-Ground based Panel for the 2001 Astronomy and Astrophysics Survey. In 1996, Dr. Dressler chaired the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy’s Hubble Space Telescope and Beyond Committee that called for the building of a next-generation space telescope to replace the Hubble; this project, now under way, is now called the James Webb Space Telescope. The committee’s report also led to the creation of the Origins Theme at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Office of Space Science, which led to a program to integrate the results of astronomical research in the formation of galaxies to planets, stars, and life. For his leadership in space astronomy, he received NASA’s Public Service Medal. William L. Friend [NAE] is chairman of the University of California’s President’s Council on the National Laboratories—Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Berkeley. He graduated summa cum laude in chemical engineering from Polytechnic University and received an M.S. from the University of Delaware in 1958, also in chemical engineering. He retired as executive vice president and director of the Bechtel Group, Inc. (BGI), in 1998 after 41 years in the international engineering and construction industry. His special interests include process design, systems engineering, environmental impacts, Latin America, and engineering education.

OCR for page 51
Setting Priorities for Large Research Facility Projects Supported by the National Science Foundation He was elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in 1993 and treasurer and member of the NAE Council in 2001. Mr. Friend joined Bechtel in 1977 in Houston in the petroleum and chemical sector. He moved to San Francisco in 1980 and later became a corporate officer, director, group executive vice president, and ultimately member of the Executive Committee of the parent BGI. Before joining Bechtel, Mr. Friend had a distinguished career in process engineering and management, including 5 years (1972-1977) as president and chief executive officer of J. F. Pritchard of Kansas City, Missouri, and 15 years (1957-1972) with The Lummus Company in worldwide operations. He currently serves as a member of the NAE Committee on the Diversity of the Engineering Work-force, as chair of NAE’s Finance and Budget Committee, and as a member of the executive committee of the National Research Council Governing Board. He has served on the Committee on Building a Long-Term Environmental Quality Research and Development Program in the US Department of Energy and on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration panel on the Space Station. He is a director of Bechtel National, Inc., and a member of the Board of Consultants of Riggs National Corporation. Bruce Hevly is associate professor in the Department of History, University of Washington. After receiving a B.A. with majors in history and physics at Carleton College, Northfield, Minnesota, he earned a Ph.D. in the Department of History of Science at Johns Hopkins University and later spent 2 years as a postdoctoral scholar in the Program in History and Philosophy of Science at Stanford University, with sponsorship from the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. He was laboratory historian at the US Naval Research Laboratory from 1985 to 1987 and joined the University of Washington in 1989. His subjects of special interest are the history of technology; the history of modern physics (especially terrestrial physics); science-technology relationships; science, technology, and the military; and the use of history in science teaching. He is a member of the History of Science Society, the Society for the History of Technology, the British Society for the History of Science, and the American Geophysical Union. Wesley Huntress is the director of the Carnegie Institution’s Geophysical Laboratory. He was associate administrator for space science at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Headquarters from 1993 to 1998 and director of the Solar System Exploration Division from 1990 to 1992. Before joining the Senior Executive Service, Dr. Huntress had been detailed from the California Institute of Technology’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for 2 years as special assistant to the director of the Earth Science and Applications Division. Dr. Huntress began his career at JPL as a National Research Council resident associate in 1968 before joining

OCR for page 51
Setting Priorities for Large Research Facility Projects Supported by the National Science Foundation JPL permanently. Dr. Huntress has over 100 peer-reviewed publications in astrochemistry. He is a member of the National Research Council’s Division Committee on Engineering and Physical Sciences. His current professional memberships include the American Astronautical Society (past president), the American Astronomical Society Division of Planetary Sciences (past chair), and the Planetary Society (president). He received his Ph.D. in chemical physics from Stanford University. Sir Chris Llewellyn-Smith is director of the UK Atomic Energy Authority’s Culham Division, which is responsible for the UK’s thermonuclear-fusion program and operates the Joint European Torus. He served as provost and president of University College London from 1999 to 2002, director general of CERN (the European Laboratory for Particle Physics) from 1994 to 1998, and chairman of Oxford Physics from 1987 to 1992. He is a theoretical physicist and has worked on a wide array of topics related to particle-physics experiments. He has also published and spoken widely on aspects of science policy and international scientific collaboration. He has been a fellow of the Royal Society since 1984, and his scientific contributions and leadership have been recognized by awards and honors in seven countries on three continents. He has served on numerous national and international advisory bodies, including the Prime Minister’s Advisory Committee on Science and Technology. After receiving a D.Phil. in theoretical physics at Oxford in 1967, he worked briefly in the Lebedev Institute in Moscow and then at CERN and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center before returning to Oxford in 1974. Linda J. (Lee) Magid is a professor of chemistry at the University of Tennessee (UT). Her research focuses on physiochemical investigations of micelles and polyelectrolytes in aqueous solutions; techniques used include light scattering, small-angle neutron scattering, neutron spin-echo spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic-resonance spectroscopy. She has served as vice-president for research and graduate studies at the University of Kentucky and is now acting director of the University of Tennessee –Oak Ridge National Laboratory Joint Institute for Neutron Sciences. She has a B.S. in chemistry from Rice University and a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Tennessee. She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She is a member of the National Research Council Board on Physics and Astronomy and serves as chair of its Solid State Sciences Committee. In addition, she serves on the NRC’s Research Council Board on Assessment of National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Programs Subpanel for NIST Center for Neutron Research and on the US National Committee for the International Union

OCR for page 51
Setting Priorities for Large Research Facility Projects Supported by the National Science Foundation of Pure and Applied Chemistry. She also served on the NRC’s Committee on Developing a Federal Materials Strategy. Marc Y.E. Pelaez is a private consultant to defense and commercial companies. He provides advice on program development, program execution, technology development, and commercialization. His experience includes 28 years in the US Navy, from which he retired as a rear admiral, and over 5 years as a corporate vice president. From 1996 through 2001, Mr. Pelaez was a vice president of Newport News Shipbuilding, the largest private shipbuilding company in the United States. Initially serving as vice president of engineering, he was responsible for all aspects of the company’s engineering endeavors, including a workforce of over 4,500 engineers and designers. Mr. Pelaez retired from the company in December 2001. From 1993 to 1996, as chief of naval research, Mr. Pelaez was responsible for the Department of the Navy’s $1.5 billion annual corporate science and technology investment, as well as intellectual-property management, technology transfer policy, and worldwide technology monitoring with offices in London and Tokyo. Furthermore, he had fiduciary responsibility for the Department of the Navy’s $9 billion research and development budget. Other Navy assignments included being director of submarine technology at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and commanding officer of the nuclear-powered attack submarine USS Sunfish (SSN 649). He has served on the boards of directors of several companies and several professional service organizations. He is a past cochair of the Virginia Research and Technology Advisory Commission, a statewide statutory commission providing advice and recommendations to the governor. Mr. Pelaez is a 1968 graduate of the US Naval Academy and the recipient of numerous awards and decorations, including the Distinguished Service Medal and the Marine Machinery Association’s Jack Flanagan Award. Robert H. Rutford is Excellence in Education Foundation Chaired Professor in Geosciences and former president of the University of Texas at Dallas. He earned a B.A. and an M.A. in geography and a Ph.D. in geology from the University of Minnesota. He moved to the University of South Dakota as an assistant professor in 1967, was promoted to associate professor, and served as chairman of the Geology Department from 1969 to 1972. In 1972, he went to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln to head the Ross Ice Shelf Project, a multi-institutional and international research project in Antarctica. He was also involved in the formation of the Polar Ice Coring Office at Nebraska, a group that focused on ice drilling in both polar regions. In April 1975, he became the director of the Division of Polar Programs at the National Science Foundation (NSF) and directed

OCR for page 51
Setting Priorities for Large Research Facility Projects Supported by the National Science Foundation NSF-sponsored research in the Arctic and Antarctic. Dr. Rutford returned to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in 1977 as vice chancellor for research and graduate studies and professor of geology, positions he held until becoming president of the University of Texas at Dallas in May 1982. He served there through August of 1994, when he returned to the faculty and was named by the Board of Regents to the chaired professorship he holds today. Dr. Rutford served as president of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research from 1998 to 2002. He is a fellow of the Geological Society of America and the Texas Academy of Science. He is a member of the Arctic Institute of North America, the Nebraska Academy of Science, Sigma Xi, and the American Polar Society. Joseph H. Taylor [NAS] is James S. McDonnell Distinguished Professor of Physics at Princeton University. He has been a professor of physics since 1980 and dean of the faculty since 1997. He taught at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, from 1969 to 1980. In 1974, he and a graduate student, Russell A. Hulse, discovered the first binary pulsar, using the radiotelescope at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico. For that discovery and its contribution to the understanding of gravitation, they were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1993. In 1978, Dr. Taylor helped to found the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory. His research on pulsars confirmed Einstein’s theory of gravitational waves and thus added to the understanding of the laws governing the universe and giving observational proof of Einstein’s theory of relativity. Dr. Taylor has received the Dannie Heineman Prize of the American Astronomical Society and American Institute of Physics, a MacArthur Fellowship, and the Wolf Prize in physics. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Philosophical Society and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Physical Society. He was cochair of the National Research Council’s Decade Survey of Astronomy and Astrophysics from 1999 to 2002. He earned his B.A. with honors in physics from Haverford College and his Ph.D. in astronomy from Harvard University. Dr. Taylor’s group continues to explore problems in astrophysics and gravitational physics by means of radio-wavelength studies of pulsars. Among recent highlights are the discovery of many new pulsars, including millisecond and binary pulsars. Michael L. Telson is the director of national laboratory affairs for the University of California in its Washington Office of Federal Governmental Relations. He is responsible for managing the federal regulatory and legislative issues involving the three national laboratories managed by the University of California for the US Department of Energy (DOE): the Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, and Los Alamos laboratories.

OCR for page 51
Setting Priorities for Large Research Facility Projects Supported by the National Science Foundation He previously served as chief financial officer (CFO) of DOE from October of 1997 (after confirmation by the Senate) through May of 2001. He managed the relationship between the department and the Office of Management and Budget, four congressional appropriations subcommittees, DOE’s inspector general, and the General Accounting Office. He reported directly to Secretaries Pena, Richardson, and Abraham, advising them on all financial matters, including the preparation and execution of DOE’s nearly $20 billion annual budget, and reprogramming requests in all DOE’s business lines, including national security, science, energy, and environmental quality. As CFO, he directed a staff of more than 200, also covering other activities, including project-management oversight, strategic planning and the Government Performance and Results Act, privatization (including the sale of the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve, the initial public offering of stock in the US Enrichment Corporation, and several environmental management-privatization projects), payroll, and financial-statement issues. Before serving in DOE, he was a senior analyst on the staff of the US House of Representatives Committee on the Budget. He was responsible for reviewing energy, science, and space issues in the federal budget, including the programs of DOE, the National Science Foundation, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration; governmentwide R&D policy; and some user-fee programs (including Federal Communications Commission spectrum-auction issues). He is a member of Sigma Xi, Tau Beta Pi, and Eta Kappa Nu. He is an American Association for the Advancement of Science fellow and received the Meritorious Service, Superior Performance, and Gold Medal awards for excellence while at DOE. In 2002, he was named a senior fellow of the US Association for Energy Economics. He holds B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an M.S. in management from the Sloan School of Management. G. David Tilman [NAS] is Regents Professor, holds the McKnight University Presidential Chair in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior Ecology, and is the director of Cedar Creek Natural History Area at the University of Minnesota. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences for his discoveries of how a varied assemblage of species influences the functioning of ecosystems. He has written two books, edited three books, and published more than 160 scientific papers. He is an experimental and theoretical ecologist interested in biological diversity, in the controls of ecosystem stability and productivity, and in the long-term societal implications of human impacts on global ecosystems. For the last 20 years, he has headed the Cedar Creek Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Project, one of several National Science Foundation-funded LTER projects nationwide. He is a Guggenheim fellow, a fellow of

OCR for page 51
Setting Priorities for Large Research Facility Projects Supported by the National Science Foundation the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Pew scholar in conservation biology, and a recipient of the Ecological Society of America’s Cooper Award and the Robert H. MacArthur award. In 2001, he was designated the most highly cited environmental scientist for the decade 1990-2000 and the decade 1992-2002 by the Institute for Scientific Information. In 1996, he founded Issues in Ecology to foster communication among ecologists, the public, and government decision-makers. He has served on the Biodiversity and Ecosystems Panel of the President’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology (from 1997 to 1998), as a science adviser for Public Radio International’s “The World” (from 1997 to 1998), and on the editorial boards of Science, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Ecology, Ecological Monographs, The American Naturalist, Acta Oecologia (Paris), International Journal of Plant Sciences, and Limnology and Oceanography. He is a member of the National Research Council’s Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. PROFESSIONAL STAFF Deborah D. Stine (Study Director) is associate director of the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP) and director of the Office of Special Projects. She has worked on various projects in the National Academies since 1989. She received a National Research Council group award for her first study for COSEPUP, on policy implications of greenhouse warming, a Commission on Life Sciences staff citation for her work in risk assessment and management, and two awards from the Policy and Global Affairs Division for her dissemination efforts for National Academies reports. Other studies have addressed human reproductive cloning, science and technology centers, international benchmarking of US research fields, graduate and postdoctoral education, responsible conduct of research, careers in science and engineering, and many environmental topics. She holds a bachelor’s degree in mechanical and environmental engineering from the University of California, Irvine; a master’s degree in business administration; and a Ph.D. in public administration, specializing in policy analysis, from the American University. Before coming to the National Academies, she was a mathematician for the US Air Force, an air-pollution engineer for the state of Texas, and an air-issues manager for the Chemical Manufacturers Association. Timothy I. Meyer is a program officer with the National Research Council’s Board on Physics and Astronomy. Dr. Meyer joined the NRC’s staff in 2002 after earning his Ph.D. in experimental particle physics from Stanford University. His thesis concerned the time evolution of the B meson in the

OCR for page 51
Setting Priorities for Large Research Facility Projects Supported by the National Science Foundation BaBar experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. His work also focused on radiation monitoring and protection of silicon-based particle detectors. During his time at Stanford, Dr. Meyer received both the Paul Kirkpatrick and Centennial Teaching awards for his work as an instructor of undergraduates. He is a member of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Phi Beta Kappa, and the Union of Concerned Scientists. Donald C. Shapero is director of the National Research Council’s Board on Physics and Astronomy. He received a B.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1964 and a Ph.D. from MIT in 1970. His thesis addressed the asymptotic behavior of relativistic quantum field theories. After receiving the Ph.D., he became a Thomas J. Watson postdoctoral fellow at IBM. He subsequently became an assistant professor at American University, later moving to Catholic University and then joining the staff of the NRC in 1975. He took a leave of absence from the NRC in 1978 to serve as the first executive director of the Energy Research Advisory Board at the Department of Energy. He returned in 1979 to serve as special assistant to the president of the National Academy of Sciences. In 1982, he started the Board on Physics and Astronomy (BPA). As BPA director, he has played a key role in many NRC studies, including the two most recent surveys of physics and the two most recent surveys of astronomy and astrophysics. He is a member of the American Physical Society, the American Astronomical Society, and the International Astronomical Union. He has published research articles in refereed journals in high-energy physics, condensed-matter physics, and environmental science. Richard E. Bissell joined the National Academies in June 1998 as executive director of the Policy Division, now the Policy and Global Affairs Division, and concurrently as director of the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy. He most recently headed the organizing secretariat of the World Commission on Dams, a joint initiative of the World Bank and the World Conservation Union. During 1994-1997, he was a founding member and chair of the Inspection Panel, an independent accountability mechanism established by the executive directors of the World Bank to ensure compliance with Bank policies by its management. During the years 1986-1993, he was assistant administrator at the US Agency for International Development, first as head of the Bureau of Policy and Program Coordination and later as head of the Bureau of Research and Development. His B.A. is from Stanford, and his Ph.D. from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University.