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APPENDIX C Committee and Staff Biographies Lynda Shapiro, chair, is a professor emerita of biology at the University of Oregon's Institute of Marine Biology. Her research interests include the biology of pelagic marine phytoplankton; distributions and abun- dances of the eukaryotic ultraplankton, incorporation of these minute cells into the microbial food web, and the role of associated bacteria on the nutrition of phytoplankton; harmful algal blooms; and sustainable har- vesting of marine macroalgae. Dr. Shapiro has served on several National Research Council (NRC) committees including the Committee on Major U.S. Oceanographic Research Programs, Committee on Fish Stock Assess- ment Methods, Committee on the Arctic Research Vessel, and Committee to Review Atlantic Bluefin Tuna, and she has served as a member of the Ocean Studies Board (OSB). Dr. Shapiro earned her Ph.D. in marine biology from Duke University in 1974. Kevin Arrigo is an assistant professor of geophysics at Stanford University. Dr. Arrigo's research interests include understanding the role marine micro- algae play in biochemical cycling, with particular emphasis on the scales of temporal and spatial variability of microalgal biomass and productivity; understanding how anthropogenic and atmospheric forcing controls the biogenic flux of CO2 into the oceans and, ultimately, the sediments; remote sensing; and Antarctic biological oceanography. Dr. Arrigo earned his Ph.D. in biology from the University of Southern California in 1992. Don Bowen is a research scientist at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Canada, and an adjunct professor in 101

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102 APPENDIX C the Biology Department, Dalhousie University. His research has focused on the life history variation, population dynamics, foraging ecology, and ecological energetics of marine mammals. Since 1999, he has served as editor of Marine Mammal Science. He also serves on the Hawaiian Monk Seal Recovery Team and the Special Committee on Seals in the United Kingdom. Dr. Bowen previously served on the NRC's Committee to Review the Gulf of Alaska Ecosystem Monitoring Program and the Com- mittee on Bering Sea Ecosystems, and he currently serves on the North Pacific Research Board's Science Panel. He earned his Ph.D. in zoology from the University of British Columbia in 1978. Rognvaldur Hannesson is a professor of economics at the Norges Handelshoyskole Norwegian School of Economics and Business Admin- istration. Dr. Hannesson's research interests include fisheries manage- ment, economics of fish resources, micro- and macroeconomics, petroleum economics, natural resources economics, growth theory, and property rights. Dr. Hannesson served on the NRC Committee to Review Indi- vidual Fishing Quotas. Dr. Hannesson earned his Ph.D. in fisheries economics from the University of Lund in 1974. Steven Hare is a quantitative biologist for the International Halibut Commission in Seattle, Washington. Dr. Hare's research interests include climate variability and its impacts on marine populations; fisheries popu- lation dynamics modeling and stock assessment; incorporating climate dynamics into fisheries management strategies; factors influencing the processes of growth and recruitment; and the North Pacific ecosystem dynamics and carrying capacity. He serves on the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council's Scientific and Statistical Committee. Dr. Hare earned his Ph.D. in fisheries from the University of Washington in 1996. David Karl is a professor of oceanography at the University of Hawaii. His research interests include marine microbial ecology, biogeochemistry, long-term time-series studies of climate and ecosystem variability, and the ocean's role in regulating the global concentration of CO2 in the atmo- sphere. Dr. Karl is a member of the Polar Research Board. He earned his Ph.D. in oceanography from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, in 1978. Brenda Konar is an assistant professor at the School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. Dr. Konar's research interests include fish assemblages associated with sea lion haul- outs; utilization of Alaska kelp beds by commercially important fish; freeze tolerance and survival of intertidal invertebrates; Bering Sea benthic

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APPENDIX C 103 amphipod community stability or instability relative to changing oceano- graphic conditions and increased gray whale predation; comparison of Barents-Bering Sea trajectories of marine ecosystem response to Arctic climate change; subtidal, intertidal, and benthic ecology; phycology; invertebrate biology; research scuba diving; biodiversity; and monitoring programs. Dr. Konar earned her Ph.D. in biology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, in 1998. Robie Macdonald is a research scientist at the Institute of Ocean Sciences, Fisheries and Oceans, Canada. His research focuses on ocean geochemis- try; contaminant processes; stable isotopes; environmental assessment; freshwater budgets, shelf processes, and sea-ice formation; and organic carbon cycling in marine sediments. He has received the University Medal in Chemistry, the Society of Chemical Industry Merit Award, and the Chemical Institute of Canada Prize. Dr. Macdonald is a member of the Polar Research Board. He earned his Ph.D. in oceanography in 1972 from Dalhousie University. Wieslaw Maslowski is an associate research professor at the Naval Post- graduate School. Dr. Maslowski's research interests include Arctic ocean- ography; numerical ocean and sea-ice modeling; ocean circulation and climate change; physical and polar oceanography; dynamical oceanography and numerical modeling; climate variability in the Arctic Ocean; and impacts of mesoscale ocean currents on sea ice in high-resolution Arctic ice and ocean simulations. Dr. Maslowski earned his Ph.D. from the Uni- versity of Alaska in 1994. Julian P. McCreary, Jr., is currently the director of the International Pacific Research Center (IPRC) at the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology at the University of Hawaii, Honolulu. The IPRC's Mission is "to provide an international, research environment to improve under- standing of the nature and predictability of climate variability in the Asia- Pacific sector, including regional aspects of global environmental change." Dr. McCreary's research interests include equatorial ocean dynamics, coastal ocean dynamics, ocean circulation, coupled ocean-atmosphere models of climate dynamics, and ecosystem modeling. Dr. McCreary is a member of the Ocean Studies Board. He received his Ph.D. in oceanography from Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, in 1977. Caleb Pungowiyi is a Yup'ik Eskimo who was born and raised on Savoonga on St. Lawrence Island. He has extensive experience as a spokes- person and advocate for Native concerns and traditional knowledge in

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104 APPENDIX C regional, national, and international policy matters. Pungowiyi is cur- rently president of the Robert Aqqaluk Newlin, Sr., Memorial Trust in Kotzebue, Alaska. He currently serves as the Marine Mammal Com- mission's special advisor on native affairs. He is a former president and CEO of the Inuit Circumpolar Conference. He currently serves on the Bering Straits Regional Commission and the Committee of Scientific Advisors for the Marine Mammal Commission. Pungowiyi also serves on the Bering Sea Impact Study (a subcommittee of the International Arctic Science Committee), the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States, and the Indigenous People's Council for Marine Mammals. Past service has included the National Science Foundation Office of Polar Programs Advisory Committee, the Inuit Circumpolar Conference Executive Council, the Steering Committee of the Alaska Native Science Commission, the Polar Research Board Committee on Bering Sea Ecosystems, the Advisory Panel on Arctic Impacts from Soviet Nuclear Contamination, the Native American Rights Fund, the Alaska Coastal Policy Council, and the Alaska Conservation Foundation. Vladimir Radchenko is the director of the Sakhalin Research Institute of Fisheries and Oceanography in Russia. Dr. Radchenko has more than 15 years of experience in fisheries research in the Bering Sea. His research interests focus on the composition, structure, and dynamics of nekton communities of the Bering Sea epipelagic layer; seasonal spatial distribu- tion dynamics; and historical trends of fisheries and stocks condition of Pacific salmon. He currently serves as member and chair of the PICES Biological Oceanography Committee. Dr. Radchenko earned his Ph.D. in fisheries research from the Pacific Scientific Research Fisheries Center in Vladivostok in 1994. STAFF Sheldon Drobot has been a program officer at the Polar Research Board and the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate since December 2002. He received his Ph.D. in geosciences (climatology specialty) from the Uni- versity of Nebraska-Lincoln. Dr. Drobot has directed NRC studies on Climate Data Records from Operational Satellites and A Vision for the International Polar Year 20072008. His research interests include sea ice-atmosphere interactions, microwave remote sensing, statistics, and long-range climate outlooks. Dr. Drobot currently is researching interannual variability and trends in Arctic sea-ice conditions and how low-frequency atmospheric circulation affects sea-ice distribution; short-range forecasting of Great Lakes ice conditions; and biological implications of sea-ice variability.

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APPENDIX C 105 Joanne C. Bintz has been a program officer at the Ocean Studies Board since June 2001. She received her Ph.D. in biological oceanography from the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. Dr. Bintz has conducted research on the effects of decreasing water quality on eel- grass seedlings and the effects of eutrophication on shallow macrophyte dominated coastal ponds using mesocosms. She has directed NRC studies that led to the following reports: Review of the Florida Keys Carrying Capacity (2002), Chemical Reference Materials: Setting the Standard for Ocean Science (2002), and Implementation of a Seafloor Observatory Network for Oceanographic Science (2004). Her interests include coastal ecosystem ecol- ogy and function, marine technology, seagrass ecology and restoration, oceanographic education, and coastal management and policy. Terry Schaefer is a program officer at the Ocean Studies Board where he has been since August 2001. He received his Ph.D. in oceanography and coastal sciences from Louisiana State University in 2001 and a Master's degree in biology and coastal zone studies from the University of West Florida in 1996. In 1998, Dr. Schaefer served as a John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellow in the Office of the chief scientist, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Since joining the Ocean Studies Board, he has directed Science and its Role in the National Marine Fisheries Service (2002). Previously, Dr. Schaefer worked for the U.S. Environmental Pro- tection Agency, National Park Service, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and U.S. Forest Service. His interests include recruitment dynamics of marine populations, experimental statistics, coastal zone management, and marine policy. Ann Carlisle is an administrative associate with the Polar Research Board and has been with the Division on Earth and Life Studies for over six years. While working for the Board, she has assisted with the completion of several studies including: A Century of Ecosystem Science: Planning Long- Term Research in the Gulf of Alaska (2002), The Oil Spill Recovery Institute-- Past Present and Future Directions (2003), and Frontiers in Polar Biology in the Genomic Era (2003). Byron Mason serves as a senior project assistant for the Division on Earth and Life Studies. He received a B.A. in anthropology from the University of Florida. During his tenure, he has assisted with the completion of two reports: Implementing Climate and Global Change Research (2004) and A Geospatial Framework for the Coastal Zone: National Needs for Coastal Map- ping and Charting (2004).

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106 APPENDIX C Sarah Capote is a project assistant with the Ocean Studies Board. She earned her B.A. in history from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2001. During her tenure with the Board, Ms. Capote worked on the following reports: Exploration of the Seas: Voyage into the Unknown (2003), Nonnative Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay (2004), and Future Needs in Deep Submergence Science: Occupied and Unoccupied Vehicles in Basic Ocean Research (2004).