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Appendixes

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PREPUBLICATION COPY Subject to Further Editorial Correction Appendix A Workshop Agenda Workshop on National Space Policy Space Studies Board Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center of the National Academies Huntington Room 100 Academy Drive, Irvine, CA Irvine, California November 12-1 3, 2003 Wednesday, November 12'2003 9:00 AM 9:15 Welcome and Introduction Origins of U.S. Space Policy History, lessons learned, and implications for today Remarks. J. Logsdon (moderator), H. McCurdy 10:15 10:30 12:30 PM Remarks: 3:00 W. Hoover, L. Fisk Break Rationale for the Space Program, Part 1 What are the contributions of science and exploration to broader national interests? Is the new knowledge created by science the ultimate objective of the U.S. space program, or is it a by-product of space activities carried out for other reasons? What are the contributions of humans in space as researchers, as explorers, as motivators? M. Urry (moderator), R. Giacconi, T. Jones, W. Huntress, D. Newman, ~J. Osborn LUNCH Rationale for the Space Program, Part 2 How should one weigh the interactions between national security, military, and civilian space efforts? Will space become an economic center of gravity? What are the contributions of space activities to U.S. foreign policy objectives? R. Jacobson (moderator), D. Cromer, N. Neureiter, JR. Thompson Break A-1

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Appendix A Workshop Agenda Workshop on National Space Policy Space Studies Board Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center of the National Academies Huntington Room 100 Academy Drive Irvine, California November 12-13, 2003 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2003 9:00 AM 9:15 Remarks. 10:15 10:30 Welcome and Introduction Origins of U.S. Space Policy History, lessons learned, and implications for today J. Logsclon (moclerator), H. McC?~rcly Break Rationale for the Space Program, Part 1 What are the contributions of science and exploration to broacler national interests? Is the new knowledge created by science the ultimate objective of the U.S. space program, or is it a by-product of space activities carried out for other reasons? What are the contributions of humans in space as researchers, as explorers, as motivators? W. Hoover, L. Fisk Remarks. ~ Urry (moclerator), R. Giacconi, T. Jones, W. Huntress, D. Newman, ~J. Osborn 12:30 PM Lunch 1:30 Rationale for the Space Program, Part 2 How should one weigh the interactions between national security, military, and civilian space efforts? Will space become an economic center of gravity? What are the contributions of space activities to U.S. foreign policy objectives? Remarks. R. Jacobson (moclerator), D. Cromer, N. Ne?~reiter, JR. Thompson 3:00 Break 45

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3:15 Guiding Principles of a 21st-Century Space Policy What principles should apply for setting goals and priorities and clefining balance? What are the implications for clefining institutional roles and responsibilities and other organizational factors? Remarks. G. Paprikas (moclerator), N. Hinners, T. La Porte, R. Richardson, A. Wheelon 5:30 Reception and dinner, Beckman Center THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2003 9:00 AM Opening remarks L. Fisk 9:15 Remarks. 10:15 10:30 12:00 Boundary Conditions for Forging a 21st-Century Space Policy What are key considerations for changing or setting national space policy? What are the key enabling or constraining factors toward a renewed national space policy? What should be key elements for a strategy for reaching consensus on the purposes of the space program? S. Flajser (moclerator), D. Fink, R. Frosch, R. Malow Break Summary and Wrap-Up L. Fisk (moclerator) Act hoc pane! drawn from selectee! workshop participants Adjourn Lunch buffet, Beckman Center 46