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Part 4 Organizational Resources

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MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT DIRECTORY Part 4: Organizational Resources This part provides brief descriptions and contact information for 72 organizations that are active in affairs related to medical technology. Although most of these organiza- tions do not generate technology assessment reports on a regular basis, they have memberships concerned with medical technologies, conduct relevant meetings and symposiums, publish conference proceedings and other documents of note, establish standards for technologies, or are active in government, regulatory, or other policy affairs relevant to the field. The organizational descriptions are arranged alphabetically by organization name. Each includes name, address, and telephone number of the organization; contact personks), and a brief narrative description of the organization. Beginning on page 603 is a subject index for identifying organizations involved in particular areas. 556

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ORGANIZATIONAL SOURCES Alliance for Engineering in Medicine ant! Biology ~101 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 700 Washington, DC 20036 202-857-1 199 Contact: Patricia I. Homer, Executive Director The Alliance for Engineering in Medicine and Biology (AEMB ~ was established in 1969 in response to a recognition among engineers, physicians, and other scientists that the development of the field of biomedical engineering needed improved linkages among those in medicine. the life sciences, engineering, and the physical sciences. The alliance consists of 17 professional associations whose members are concerned with the introduction and use of advanced technology in life sciences research and in clinical practice. These associations are the: American Association for Medical Systems and Informatics, American Association of Physicists in Medicine, American College of Radiology, American Institute of Chemical Engineers, American Society for Artificial Internal Organs, American Society for Engineering Education, American Society for Hospital Engineering of the American Hospital Association, American Society for Testing and Materials, American Society of Agricultural Engineers, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, American Society of Civil Engineers, Biomedical Engineer- ing Society, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Instrument Society of America, Neuroelectric Society, RESNA Association for the Advancement of Reha- bilitation Technology, and SPIE International Society for Optical Engineering. AEMB is the U.S. affiliate to the International Federation for Medical and Biological ~ . . engineering. The alliance has conducted and participated in a number of significant programs, including an International Biomedical Engineering Workshop Series that resulted in a six-volume publication; a five-year medical ultrasound research and development agendum; a systems design for a clinical ultrasound facility; technology procurement in health care institutions; and an international technology transfer project in Cairo, Egypt, now a Middle East center for ultrasonography training and expertise. The Annual Conference on Engineering in Medicine and Biology is a major national, interdisciplinary meeting; its published proceedings are an important reference for the field. AEMB sponsors a national honor society for biomedical engineering students. 557

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MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT DIRECTORY American Academy of Dermatology 1567 MaPIe Avenue PO BOX 3~16 EVanStOn, IL 60204-3 ~ ~ 6 3 12-869-3954 Contact: Raymond W. Cunningham, fir., Director, Department of Dermatologic Prac- tice The 6,700-member American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) represents most prac- ticing dermatologists in the U.S. The principle objective of the Association is the continuation of dermatologic education. AAD is committed to quality standards in continuing education and plays a role in formulating policies that can influence the quality of dermatologic care. The academy has developed programs that promote and advance the science and art of medicine and surgery related to the skin, hair and nails; promote standards in clinical practice, education and research in dermatology and related disciplines; support and enhance patient care; and promote public interest related to dermatology. AAD is interested and aware of the many technological advances that have been made in the last few years. The AAD Council on Clinical and Laboratory Services is reviewing mechanisms to allow the academy to formally assess these technologies as they relate to dermatology. New technology requiring review and comment by the academy is now referred to the appropriate council, committee or task force germane to that particular issue. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons 222 South Prospect Avenue Park Ridge, IL 60068-4058 3 12-823-7 1 86 Contact: Rebecca M. Maron, Director, Department of Professional Affairs & Policy Analysis The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) is a nonprofit corporation founded in Chicago in 1933. With 12,181 members, the AAOS is the largest medical organization for musculoskeletal specialists. Members of the academy have completed up to five years of specialty study in orthopaedics in an accredited residency program, passed a comprehensive oral and written exam, and been certified by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery. Educating its members to help assure a high level of skill and competence is the major function of the AAOS. Its educational programs include an appraisal of the effective- ness of relevant technology. Each year the academy offers more than 30 continuing medical education courses across the country. ~_ ~ A A ~ ~ _~^ ^~ The academy's annual meeting is its primary education program. It features the presentation of scientific papers, instructional courses, technical exhibits, audiovisual presentations, and symposia on a variety of topics. 558

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ORGANIZATIONAL RESOURCES The 50 committees of the academy address a myriad of technical subjects, sponsor education programs, and inform the membership and the public about the latest developments within orthopaedics. The academy is currently involved in a pilot project to develop minimum standards for orthopaedic care; these standards may or may not ultimately include technology assessments. American Acaclemy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery ~ 101 Vermont Avenue, NW, Suite 302 Washington, DC 20005-3521 202-289-4607 Contact: Jerome C. Goldstein, M.D., Executive Vice President The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) is a nonprofit medical association that provides governmental and socioeconomic support for otolaryngologists. It is intended to advance the science and art of medicine related to otolaryngology and provide educational services for the specialty. AAO-HNS con- ducts two scientific meetings per year and offers continuing education programs. AAO-HNS relates to agencies of the federal government concerning matters relevant to otolaryngology such as ambulatory surgery, thyroid surgery, drug problems, hear- ing aids and other assistive devices, Medicare and Medicaid, noise, manpower, and technology assessment. It monitors legislative and regulatory activities and has activat- ed a legislative network. Drawing from government publications and other sources, the academy keeps its members informed of advances in medical and surgical procedures, including new drug and device modalities. The academy's 50 committees are involved with medical and surgical practices and procedures. These committees generate voluntary standards of care and develop policy statements. Several committees are working at developing guidelines for instru- ments, diagnostic tools and medical and surgical devices. One committee is concerned with safety standards for the use of lasers in surgery. The Hearing and Equilibrium Committee keeps abreast of standards for the manufacture and development of the cochlear implants and criteria for patient selection. Members of the Committee on National and International Standards work with the American National Standards Institute and the American Society of Testing and Materials in developing standards for medical equipment and devices and other standards for health care delivery. One committee has recently been developed to produce a manual for quality assurance. American Acaclemy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 122 South Michigan Avenue, Suite 1300 Chicago, IL 60603-6 ~ 07 312-922-9366 Contact: Ike A. Mayeda, Executive Director Founded in 1938, the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (AAPMR) is the national organization for physicians who have been certified through examination as specialists in physical medicine and rehabilitation by the American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. This specialty focuses on patients who are disabled and whose functional abilities have been impaired to varying degrees. 559

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MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT DIRECTORY These include disabilities and impairments from strokes, cerebral palsy or other birth defects; arthritis, cardiac disease, pulmonary disease, or from other paralyses; and . . . 1ngurles. The academy is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Edu- cation to sponsor CME programs, publishes study guides in nine areas related to physical medicine and rehabilitation, provides a self-assessment program for residents and practicing physicians to assess their knowledge, and works with other or~aniznrion.s in maintaining and improving educational standards for the profession. The AAPMR Medical Practice Committee has various subcommittees for quality assur- ance and health care financing, facility standards, assessment of diagnostic and thera- peutic modalities and devices. Other major activities include publication of the monthly journal Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, annual meeting, and tracking legislative development and issues in physician medicine and rehabilitation practice, education and research. ~_ American Association of BloocI Banks Ill7 North 19th Street,Suite 600 Arlington, VA 22209 703-528-8200 Contact: Jackie Campbell, Director of Communications The American Association of Blood Banks (AABB) is a nonprofit professional, scien- tific and administrative association for individuals and institutions engaged in blood banking and transfusion medicine. The 7,000 individual members are physicians, medical technologists, nurses, administrators, donor recruiters, and others involved in blood banking. Institutional members are 2,400 community and hospital blood banks and hospital transfusion services that are responsible for collecting nearly half, and transfusing 80 percent, of the nation's blood supply. AABB supports making available for patients a safe, adequate, economical and volun- tary supply of blood and components; to encourage the voluntary donation of blood and other tissues and organs; to foster scientific investigation, clinical application, education and exchange of ideas; to encourage, advance and certify high standards of administrative and technical performance; to function as a clearinghouse for the exchange of blood and blood credits nationwide; and to plan for cooperation in times of disaster. The AABB Committee on Standards sets standards for practice used world-wide in blood banks and transfusion services. The inspection and accreditation program strives to improve the safety and quality of transfusions and assists in determining whether methods, procedures and personnel meet established standards. AABB reference laboratories provide exchange of information and consultation on rare blood group antibodies and other advanced technical and scientific problems. The parentage testing program provides for accreditation in parentage testing and monitors advancements in the field. The autologous transfusion information file assists in planning programs and monitoring new techniques. AABB's annual meeting highlights new research and technology in the fields of blood banking, transfusion medicine, hematology, immuno- hematology and tissue/organ transplantation. AABB publishes several new books year- ly on issues of significance in blood banking. . . 560

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ORGANIZATIONAL SOURCES American Association for Medical Systems and ~x~fonnatics ~ ~ O ~ Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 700 Washington, DC 20036 202-857- 1 1 89 Contact: Patricia I. Homer, Executive Director The American Association for Medical Systems and Informatics (AAMSI) is a national professional medical society incorporated in 1981 in a merger of the Society for Computer Medicine and the Society for Advanced Medical Systems. In AAMSI, exper- tise is shared to ensure continued flow of information, research and education in the health care field. Members are entitled to join one of 14 professional specialty groups that provide the opportunity to contribute, obtain, and exchange information about their professional areas of health care. AAMSI conducts its annual congress on the west coast each spring and a conference on the east coast in the fall. These meetings provide forums for sharing and teaching current developments and implementation of systems for health care and medical informatics in support of patient care, research and health adminis- trat~on. AAMSI's two bimonthly journals are Computers and Biomedical Research and M.D. Com- puting. AAMSI makes available proceedings of the annual congress, a Mental Health Systems Software Directory, and a Directory of Publications in Health Systems and Inform~atics. American Association of Tissue Banks ~ ~ 17 North 19th Street, Suite 402 Arlirlgton, Virginia 22209 703-528-0663 Contract: Jeanne C. Mowe, Executive Director The American Association of Tissue Banks (AATB) is a nonprofit organization found- ed in 1976 in response to increased need for transplantable tissues. AATB has two principal goals: to establish standards for the collection, preservation, and distribution of tissues leading to the development of inspection and accreditation mechanisms for tissue collecting organizations, and to improve the efficiency of tissue banking by encouraging the development of regional tissue banks that collect and distribute a variety of tissues of high quality with maximum economy. AATB is structured into councils in five areas: musculoskeletal, ocular, reproductive, skin, and tissue bank. Each council is responsible for development of guidelines and standards, and for scientific programs. In September 1984, the association published standards for tissue banking. Each of the councils has formulated, for its respective type of tissue, procedures for donor selection, retrieval procedures, maintenance of asepsis, storage conditions, quality control and record keeping. Based on these standards and procedures, AATB has developed a program of inspection and accreditation for organizations that retrieve, bank, and distribute tissues. AATB acts as an information center regarding tissue retrieval and processing activities in the U.S. AATB collects and disseminates information regarding tissue banking and undertakes promotional and educational programs for stimulating tissue donation and encouraging efficiency of tissue banking. A program for training and certification of tissue bank personnel is currently under development. 561

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MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT DIRECTORY American College of Emergency Physicians 1125 EXeCUtiVe Circle Irving, TX 75038-2522 2 14-550-09 1 1 Contact: Colin C. Rorrie, fir., Ph.D., Executive Director The American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) is a nonprofit professional medical association founded in 1968 to facilitate the exchange of information among . . . . P nyslclans practicing emergency medicine. The college has more than 11,000 mem- bers, and is dedicated to the education and professional growth of emergency physi- cians and to the improvement of patient care. ACEP conducts continuing medical education programs on clinical and non-clinical subjects through meetings, workshops, seminars, publications, cassettes, and courses. It provides such member services as monitoring federal legislation and regulations, programs related to pre-hospital emergency care, assistance to its state chapters, and liaison programs with government, third-party carriers, other medical associations, and various scientific and research organizations. Although the college does not conduct technology assessment, the annual ACEP scientific meeting features more than 200 scientific and commercial exhibits. Technical information is sometimes addressed in articles in Annals of Emergency Medicine, the college's monthly clinical and scientificjournal. For example, the journal has published articles on the effectiveness of different types of cervical immobilization collars and scientific studies comparing different techniques of drug administration. American College of Gastroenterology 13 Elm Street Manchester, ME 0 ~ 944 6 1 7-927-8330 Contact: Thomas F. Fise, Executive Director The American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) is an international nonprofit orga- nization of over 2,000 members dedicated to serving the clinically oriented gastroenter- ologist. It is composed of gastroenterologists, surgeons, radiologists, hepatologists, pediatricians, and other physicians sharing an interest in the care of patients with digestive disease. ACG's purposes include promoting and advancing gastroenterology and allied subjects in medical schools and hospitals, and maintaining and promoting standards in medical education, practice, and research in gastroenterology. ACG en- deavors to provide public education regarding digestive disease and develop and implement health care standards at the national and local level. ACG is committed to clinical research and provides conceptual and financial support for investigative studies. Efforts in the area of technology assessment fall within the purview of the Committee on Research, which numbers 10 physicians engaged in teaching and patient care programs at major academic institutions and hospitals. Through this committee, competitive grants are awarded annually. In addition, nation- al clinical research projects are supported through awards granted by the ACG board. The results of these and other ACG sponsored projects are presented at the national and local meetings. The emphasis on clinical relevance provides is intended to keep the 562

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ORGANIZATIONAL SOURCES practitioner abreast of trends in diagnosis and treatment modalities in gastroenterol- ogy, and serves to encourage clinical researcher-investigators by providing a forum for their work. Most recently ACG has provided grants in support of selected research programs on Barrett's esophagus and colon polyps. ACG provides a broad spectrum of educational programs through meetings and courses with CME accreditation. Its annual meeting includes sessions, poster sessions, and symposia, and is held in conjunction with a postgraduate course and a large commercial exhibit covering the latest in gastrointestinal technology, therapy and literature. ACG also sponsors regional meetings. American College of Nuclear Physicians ~ ~ O ~ Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 700 Washington, DC 20036 202-857- 1 1 35 Contact: Carol A. Lively, Executive Director The American College of Nuclear Physicians (ACNP) represents over 1,200 physicians and scientists engaged in the practice or development of nuclear medicine. In support of the development and implementation of new and improved medical technology in the field of nuclear medicine, the college promotes funding for research and develop- ment, and works with federal agencies in addressing regulatory issues inherent in bringing nuclear medicine materials and instrumentation safely and efficiently to market and to medical practice and research. The college's standing committees on nuclear medicine science, radiopharmaceuticals, and standardization of nuclear medicine instrumentation provide forums in which members can monitor and have input into the development of nuclear medicine technology. As the need arises, the college establishes ad hoc task forces to address specific issues relevant to certain nuclear medicine technologies. For example, college members have participated in a joint task force with the Society of Nuclear Medicine to develop a comprehensive paper on the clinical utility of positron emission tomography, for purposes of recommending reimbursement under Medicare. college members have also promoted reimbursement for the use of dual photon absorptiometry in the diagnosis and monitoring of treatment of osteoporosis. American College of Preventive Medicine 1015 Fifteenth Street, NW, Suite 403 Washington, DC 20005 202-789-0003 Contact: William M. Kane, Ph.D., Executive Director The American College of Preventive Medicine (ACPM), established in 1954, is a society of physician specialists whose mission is to foster the professional standards, provide for scholarly exchanges, promote prevention-oriented medical care and research, and give national leadership in enhancing public awareness of benefits of health promotion, risk reduction and disease prevention. 563

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MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT DIRECTORY Although the college does not engage directly in technology assessment, it has partici- pated in the technology assessment activities of the American Medical Association and those conducted by the Council of Medical Specialty Societies. The college has identi- fied a number of members with expertise in specific areas to work with both the AMA and CMSS. When issues related to preventive medicine procedures and technologies arise, the AMA and the CMSS refer these questions to selected ACPM members. In addition, the college has cooperated with the congressional Office of Technology Assessment. American Council on Transplantation 700 North Fairfax Street Suite 505 Alexanctria, VA 22314-2040 703-836-4301 Contact: Nancy R. Holland, Executive Director The American Council on Transplantation (ACT) was established in 1983 as a non- profit, national federation to bring together organizations and individuals to improve the donation and delivery of organs and tissue transplantation. The council has over 800 organizational and individual members. ACT provides a national public policy forum to address and seek consensus on social, psychological, ethical, and economic issues involved in organ and tissue recovery and transplantation. It provides the opportunity for individuals and organizations con- cerned with organ and tissue transplantation to have an active voice in the discussion and formulation of public policy regarding transplantation. Among its activities, ACT encourages the availability of immunosuppressive drubs for ~- ~ 1 1 ~ patients on an outpatient basis; promotes the establishment of scientific registries for transplant recipients for ongoing scientific and clinical evaluations; promotes a national task force to evaluate the medical, ethical, legal, and economic and social issues of transplantation and to make recommendations for improvements; encourages the passage of require-request legislation; supports Medicare coverage of heart transplan- tation; and supports in principle the federal task force on organ transplantation. Major avenues through which ACT's missions and objectives are carried out are its four forums on: organ retrieval and networking, patient and family issues, professional education, and public education. The council publishes the bimonthly newsletter Transplant Action, which serves as the primary means of communicating with ACT membership. ACT holds annual meet- ings. The council responds to thousands of requests for information annually, which are made primarily through ACT's toll free number (1-800-ACT-GIVE). American Geriatrics Society 770 Lexington Avenue, Suite 400 New York, NY 10021 212-308-1414 Contact: Carol S. Goodwin, Director of Executive Affairs 564

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ORGANIZATIONAL SOURCES The American Geriatrics Society (AGS) is a nonprofit professional medical society founded in 1942 that attempts to provide optimal health care for the elderly through programs relating to graduate medical education, fellowship training, continuing med- ical education, and research and its practical applications. In addition, the society is active in issues related to long term care health policy and ethical problems in terminal care. The society's goals are defined by the health and social problems of the elderly. The AGS is active in technology assessment through the following programs and . . . activities. ~A Publication of clinical investigations relating to technologies in the care of the elderly in the society's peer-reviewed journal of the American Geriatrics Society. Preparation of an amicus brief relating to ethical problems in tube feeding of individu . . a s In vegetative states. A project on clinical decision-making in catastrophic situations, including issues relat- ing to ICU care. Preparation of material for the congressional Office of Technology Assessment con- cerning technologies in health care as related to the elderly. Preparation of policy statements on various issues in technologies in health care. such as drugs and devices. ~- , A summer research institute, sponsored jointly with the National Institute on Aging, intended to stimulate interest in careers in aging research. The AGS conducts an annual scientific meeting on broad issues in the health care of the elderly, which includes presentations on new and established technologies and ad- vances in all clinical fields concerned with geriatric care. American Healthcare Institute 1919 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Suite 703 Washington, DC 20006 202-293-2840 Contact: Merlin K. DuVal, M.D., President The American Healthcare Institute (AHI) is a nonprofit organization that represents interests of its 31 members, each of which is a large, vertically integrated, nonprofit, multi-hospital system. Its constituent institutions number approximately 1,300 located in 44 states. The institute conducts an annual governance education conference for its members' trustees and corporate officers; sponsors research into the profiles and operation of multi-hospital systems; develops health policies supportive of develop- ment and growth of multi-hospital systems and the operation of not-for-profit hospitals generally; and promotes the implementation of those policies. American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine 4405 East-West Highway, Suite 504 Bethesda, MD 20814 30 1-656-61 17 Contact: fames S. Packer, Ph.D., Executive Director 565

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MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT DIRECTORY RPA's goals are to ensure optimal care for patients with renal disease and related disorders, to act as a national representative for physicians in the field, and to serve as a resource for development of national health policy concerning renal disease. RPA monitors legislative and regulatory activity involving the ESRD program, and acts as an advocate for graduate medical education in nephrology. RPA supports various re- search activities and promotes funding for kidney disease research. In cooperation with the Health Care Financing Administration and the Registry Com- mittee of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association, RPA has undertaken a national random sample survey of ES1lD patients in order to gauge the application and effectiveness of various modes of therapy for chronic renal failure. RPA also supports research efforts to improve and develop technologies for treatment of renal disease. The association has undertaken some informal and formal technology assessment activities including, most recently, a full-scale evaluation of the procedure of reprocess- ing dialyzers. RPA holds an annual three-day educational meeting on health policy and scientific issues. The association publishes the quarterly newsletter RPA News. RESNA Association for the Advancement of Rehabilitation Technology ~ ~ O ~ Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 700 Washington, DC 20036 202-857-1 199 Contact: Patricia I. Homer, Executive Director RESNA Association for the Advancement of Rehabilitation Technology, formerly the Rehabilitation Engineering Society of North America, was renamed to better reflect the broad array of interests and skills within the organization. The organization was established in 1979, and membership includes rehabilitation professionals, providers, and consumers who are dedicated to putting technology to work for disabled persons. RESNA annual conferences are held at various locations in North America. Other symposia and workshops are held periodically to seek answers to questions critical to the welfare of disabled persons. The proceedings of the conference are published, as well as a variety of other pertinent publications that emanate from the work of RESNA committees or from rehabilitation professionals. Sixteen RESNA special interest groups respond to the need for a communication network within the rehabilitation community to address the diverse needs of consum- ers, providers, and industry. Regional conferences are being developed to provide members with the opportunity to meet more frequently to discuss their mutual inter- ests. RESNA has developed strategies to ensure interactions among relevant professions, and to develop consensus on definition of rehabilitative needs; funding requirements for R&D, education and training; monitoring legislation; working with industry to ensure high standards and to promote the marketing of new devices; and identifying funding sources for consumers. 596

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ORGANIZATIONAL RESOURCES Society for Medical Decision Making One Main Street PO Box 447 West Lebanon, NH 03784 603-298-9929 Contact: [ohn Tomeny, Administrator The Society for Medical Decision Making (SMDM) is a nonprofit professional society founded in 1979 for the purpose of advancing the teaching and scholarship in medical decision making. The 700 members of SMDM include physicians, public health scien- tists, economists, computer scientists, health services researchers, and cognitive scien- tists. Their interests revolve around clinical decision analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis, technology assessment, medical databases, and artificial intelligence. The SMDM con- ducts continuing education courses in decision analysis and technology assessment. Medical Decision Making, an international journal of record in the field, is published quarterly by the society. SMDM holds an annual conference on decision making in the health sciences. This meeting is principally devoted to the presentation of abstracts, but hour lectures in decision science and technology assessment are staples of the confer- ence. Society of Non-Invasive Vascular Technology ~ ~ O ~ Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite '700 Washington, DC 20036 202-857-1 149 Contact: Patricia I. Homer, Executive Director The Society of Non-lnvasive Vascular Technology (SNIVT) is a nonprofit professional medical society founded in 1977 to provide education for the profession of noninvasive vascular technology and to represent the field among other health professions and to the public by providing information and education. Approximately 60 percent of the society's 2,700 members are practicing noninvasive vascular technologists or are tech- nologists involved in supervision and/or education in a clinical setting. Physicians, other health care providers, researchers, and those involved in the sale and manufacture of equipment comprise the balance of the membership. Through its publications, the journal of Vascular Technology and newsletter Spectrum, and local and national meetings, the society attempts to meet the educational and profes- sional needs of the technologists involved in vascular testing. In addition, SNIVT offers patient education pamphlets and training center directories. SNIVT is a member of and maintains liaison with organizations whose goals are related to maintaining excellence in the field. These include the American Medical Associa- tion's Joint Review Committee on Education in Cardiovascular Technology, and the American Society of Allied Health Professions. SNIVT is represented on the AMA Panel of Consultants and the American Registry of Diagnostic Medical Sonographers (ARDMS). 597

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MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT DIRECTORY In an effort to support the continuing education efforts of the registered vascular technologists, the society provides continuing education credits accepted by the ARDMS. SNIVT provides educational support for technologists preparing for the Vascular Technology Exam through its referenced study outlines. Society of Nuclear Medicine 136 MaUiSOn Avenue New York, NY 10016-6784 212-889-0717 Contact: Henry L. Ernstthal, Executive Director The Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) is a multidisciplinary organization of physi- cians, physicists, chemists, radiopharmacists, technologists, and others interested in the diagnostic, therapeutic, and investigational use of radioactive and stable nuclides. Founded in 1954, it is the largest scientific organization dedicated to nuclear medicine with over 10,500 members world-wide. The society has established special interest councils that function autonomously within the society. The Cardiovascular Council addresses performance and application of cardiovascular nuclear medicine procedures. The Computer Council is concerned with computer applications in diagnostic, therapeutic, and investigative areas of nuclear medicine. The Correlative Imaging Council is interested in developing and disseminat- ing information on medical and physiological applications of various imaging modal- ities. The Instrumentation Council promotes advancement and dissemination of knowledge of instrumentation used in nuclear medicine. The Radioassay Council is concerned with the scientific, economic, and historic elements of the radioassay disci- pline. The Radiopharmaceutical Science Council addresses dissemination of informa- tion relating to the radiopharmaceutical sciences and encourages basic radiopharma- ceutical research and development. The Academic Council promotes education in the field. SNM has participated in technology assessments conducted by other institutions by forming ad hoc committees to address specific issues referred to it by such organiza- tions as the American Medical Association and the Council of Medical Speciality Societies. The society recently formed a committee on positron emission tomography (PET) to examine the literature on PET scanning and to inquire as to its applications that improve patient management. Scientific data pertaining to assessment is published in SNM's journal of Nuclear Medicine and as part of other ongoing educational activities through its annual and other meetings and publications. Sweclish National Center for Technology Assessment in Health Care Drottning Gatan 16 ~ ~ ~ 5 ~ Stockholm Sweden (46-~) 24-05-65 Contact: Egon P. {onsson, Ph.D., Director 598

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ORGANIZATIONAL SOURCES The Swedish National Center for Medical Technology Assessment was established in 1987 and will begin operations in 1988. An independent government agency, it reports to the cabinet level of government, rather than being part of a particular ministry. The . , ,,,, ~.~. center's first-year budget is approximately >1.5 million. The major purpose of the center is to enhance and coordinate health care technology assessment activities in Sweden. It was established in response to increased internation- al interest in medical technology assessment and considerations of rising health care costs. Significant impetus to the center's formation arose from concern regarding the purportedly slow pace at which certain technologies have diffused in Sweden; an enhanced assessment capacity has been advanced as an appropriate means for enabling worthy technologies to diffuse more readily. Further, the center is intended to improve the transfer of information about medical technologies from the biomedical research community to health care providers and the public. The governing board of the National center includes representation from the Ministry of Health, Medical Research Council, National Board of Health and Welfare, Federa- tion of the County Councils, Swedish Planning and Rationalization Institute for the Health and Social Services (SPRI), Swedish Medical Association, and Swedish College of Physicians. The center's program will address medical, economic, social, and ethical aspects of new and established technologies used for diagnosis and treatment. Assessments conducted by the center will largely involve syntheses of existing information, and it may purchase data from other organizations and encourage them to conduct assessments on certain topics. The center intends to coordinate its activities with similar organizations in other nations, such as the U.S. Office of Technology Assessment and the Council on Health Care Technology of the Institute of Medicine. Technology Assessment and Forecast Program U.S. Patent and Trademark Office CM2-3 1 3 Washington, DC 20231 703-557-0433 Contact: lane Myers, Office of Documentation The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) established the Technology Assessment and Forecast Program (TAF) to stimulate the use and enhance the usability of the patent file, and to assemble, analyze, and make available meaningful data about the file. TAF uses the database in two principal ways. First, it periodically issues general distri- bution publications. One series of publications, the Technology Assessment Forecast Reports, have included reviews of highly active technological areas and areas experiencing high levels of patenting by foreign residents, profiles of the patenting patterns of the residents of selected foreign countries and U.S. states, reviews of the patent activity of the most active patent assignees, and comparisons of patent activity with economic activity in selected Standard Industrial Classification categories. Another series of publications, Patent Profiles, surveys the U.S. patenting activity in specific technologies. 599

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MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT DIRECTORY One such profile is Biotechnology: 1982 Update; others address such topics as robots, telecommunications, and microelectronics. The second principal use of the TAF data- base is to prepare custom data reports tailored to individual needs. These reports, provided on a cost reimbursable basis, are used by government agencies and the private sector. One such custom report was a technology profile report on genetic engineering, an analysis of patent activity in this area from 1963 to 1986. United States Pha~macopeial Convention ~ 260 ~ Twinbrook Parkway Rockville, MD 20852 301-881-0666 Contact: Diane M. McGinnis, Assistant Coordinator, Practitioner Reporting System The U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention (USP) is an private, nonprofit body of 300 delegates representing state and national associations and colleges of medicine, nurs- ing, and pharmacy; industry; and agencies of the federal government. Incorporated in 1900, the purposes of USP are to set standards for health care products in the U.S. and to collect and disseminate product use information to providers and consumers. Every five years, USP publishes revised standards for drugs in The United States Pharma- copeza and The National Formulary. These standards are recognized as official by the federal government and are enforceable by the FDA. The standards include specif~ca- tions pertaining to drug strength, quality, purity, packaging, and labeling. USP provides official drug reference standards, which are highly characterized speci- mens of drugs, impurities, and degradation products. USP laboratories test and moni- tor these standards, and develop analytical procedures and tests of proposed revisions of tests and assays. USP publications include USP DI Volume I: Drug Information for the Health Care Provider and USP DI Volume II: Advice for the Patient. Other publications are the consumer edition of the reference volumes About Your Medicines, the bimonthly newsletter About Your Medicines, and various brochures and books. The Drug Product Problem Reporting Program (DlPl?R) and the Medical Device and Laboratory Product Problem Reporting Program (PRP) are systems funded by the FDA for identifying and correcting problems associated with prescription and over-th- e-counter drugs and medical devices, laboratory products, radiopharmaccutical drugs, and radiological devices. Problem reports are usually submitted by practitioners to the USP via toll-free telephone or reporting forms, and are forwarded to the FDA and other appropriate government and industry agents for corrective action. Addressing product quality, DPPR is one of two FDA voluntary drug problem reporting programs (the other is the Drug Experience Reporting program for adverse drug reactions). PRP is the largest single source of device experience information for the FDA's Device Experience Reporting Network. 600

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ORGANIZATIONAL RESOURCES United Network for Organ Sharing 3001 Hungary Spring Road PO Box 28010 Richmond, VA 23228 804-289-0600 Contact: Robert Bowie, Director of Communications The United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) was incorporated in 1984 as a private non-profit organization, having grown out of the South-Eastern Organ Procurement Foundation. Its purpose is to provide the best possible organs to patients best suited to receive them, to the end that transplants may be successful and quality of life is sustained and improved. The UNOS computer system has transplant-related data on 10,000 potential recipi- ents, involving approximately 250 transplant centers, organ procurement organiza- tions, and laboratories in the U.S. The system matches data on newly available organs and tissues with potential recipients. UNOS uses its database to study factors affecting recipients after they have received transplants, to evaluate transplant procedures, and to improve the computer system. Linked to the computer system, the UNOS Organ Center assists procurement teams by providing information concerning potential placement of organs prior to procure- ment. With ties to transportation services, the Organ Center is the central point for organ distribution outside the U.S., and maintains relationships with transplant pro- grams worldwide. In 1984, the National Transplant Act mandated the establishment of a national com- puter transplant system. In 1986, UNOS received the federal contract to establish the national Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN). Among its tasks, OPTN is to develop and implement a transplant information systems plan, develop and maintain a potential transplant recipient registration system, match donors and recipi- ents, develop a telephone system, provide a transportation assistance system, develop organ procurement standards, conduct a high percent reactive antibodies patient transplant feasibility study, and improve professional education. UNOS is developing a population-based Scientific Registry for Organ Transplantation for reporting to the federal government about transplantation and to study risk factors ran ~ affecting transp antation outcomes. Requests by outside parties for access to the regis- try data will be considered by the UNOS scientific advisory committee. UNOS publish- es the monthly newsletter UNOS Update. University Hospital Consortium One Mid America Plaza, Suite 624 Oakbrook Terrace, rib 60 3 1 2-954-6766 Contact: Robert Baker, President 601

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MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT DIRECTORY The University Hospital Consortium (UHC) is a nonprofit organization formed in 1984 to aid university teaching hospitals in their efforts to maintain and strengthen their positions in the marketplace UHC includes 43 university hospitals in 24 states with a total of 23,000 beds, 775,000 admissions per year, and 25,300 medical school enrollees. UHC seeks to promote group efforts among academic teaching hospitals concerning access to information, alternative delivery systems, capital formation, insur- ance, research, marketing, and volume-purchasing. UHC is considering methods through which its member hospitals can participate in alternative delivery systems by monitoring the development of such systems on a nationwide basis and making recommendations to its members. UHC is working to promote enhanced capital formation and improved malpractice insurance for its mem- bers. It is committed to sponsoring management research programs, information exchange, and sharing of marketing information. UHC's subsidiary, the University Hospital Consortium Services Corporation, develops agreements with providers to reduce costs to UHC institutions. It sponsors pharmacy, capital equipment, and sup- plies purchasing programs, and provides a management consulting pool. UHC is developing a program to assist health product makers and venture capitalists to conduct multi-center technology assessments at its member institutions. Such a pro- gram may enhance universities' role in develonin~ and testing technolo~ie.s once co provide a means of generating and government and the private sector. 602 -I--- -----------__ gathering data for various assessment needs of

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ORGANIZATIONAL SOURCES SUBJECT INDEX TO ORGANIZATIONAL SOURCES Absorptiometry-Dual photon American College of Nuclear Physicians Aging American Geriatrics Society Anesthesiology American Society of Anesthesiologists Bioequivalency testing Generic Pharmaceutical Industry Association Biomedical engineering Alliance for Engineering in Medicine and Biolo- gY American Society of Mechanical Engineers Association for the Advancement of Medical In- strumentation Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers International Federation for Medical and Bio- logical Engineering RESNA Association for the Advancement of Rehabilitation Technology Biotechnology Association of Biotechnology Companies Blood banks American Association of Blood Banks Blood transfusion American Association of Blood Banks Clinical assessment George Washington University Medical Center Correctional institution health care American Public Health Association Decision making, Clinical Society for Medical Decision Making Dermatology American Academy of Dermatology Diagnostic imaging devices National Electrical Manufacturers Association Digestive diseases SEE Gastroenterology Drug Product Reporting Program United States Pharmacopoeial Convention Electroconvulsive therapy devices American Psychiatric Association Emergency medicine American College of Emergency Physicians End Stage Renal Disease Program Renal Physicians Association Enteral nutrition American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Oley Foundation for Home Parenteral and En- teral Nutrition Futures research Institute for Alternative Futures Institute for the Future Gastroenterology American College of Gastroenterology 603

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MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT DIRECTORY Genetic engineering Association of Biotechnology Companies Geriatric medicine American Geriatrics Society Health benefits Employee Benefit Research Institute National Association of Manufacturers Health care data National Association of Health Data Organiza- tions Health insurance Health Insurance Association of America International Federation of Voluntary Health Service Funds Health maintenance organizations American Medical Care and Review Association Group Health Association of America Health policy National Health Council Health promotion American College of Preventive Medicine American Public Health Association Health services research Association for Health Services Research Home care Oley Foundation for Home Parenteral and En- teral Nutrition Hospital management American Healthcare Institute Federation of American Health Systems Maryland Hospital Association University Hospital Consortium Hospitals Nonproprietary American Healthcare Institute Hospitals Proprietary Federation of American Health Systems Hospitals University University Hospital Consortium 604 Immunology American Society of Transplant Physicians Immunosuppressants American Council on Transplantation Individual practice associations American Medical Care and Review Association Group Health Association of America Information systems American Association for Medical Systems and Informatics Society for Medical Decision Making Internal medicine American Society of Internal Medicine Laboratories American Society of Clinical Pathologists American Society of Internal Medicine Lithium American Psychiatric Association Long term care American Geriatrics Society Magnetic resonance imaging American College of Nuclear Physicians Society of Nuclear Medicine Medical devices manufacturers Canadian Association of Manaufacturers of Medical Devices Health Industry Manufacturers Association National Electrical Manufacturers Association Medical instrumentation Association for the Advancement of Medical In strumentat~on Medical specialities Council of Medical Specialty Societies Medical systems American Association for Medical Systems and Informatics Medicare reimbursement Physician Payment Review Commission

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ORGANIZATIONAL RESOURCES Mental health Association for Health Services Research Mental illnesses American Psychiatric Association Multi-hospital systems American Healthcare Institute Noninvasive vascular technology Society of Non-Invasive Vascular Technology Nuclear medicine American College of Nuclear Physicians Society of Nuclear Medicine Organ procurement SEE Tissue procurement Otolaryngology American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Parenteral nutrition American Geriatrics Society American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Oley Foundation for Home Parenteral and En- teral Nutrition Patents Office of Technology Assessment and Forecast Pathology American Society of Clinical Pathologists Peer review organizations American Medical Care and Review Association American Medical Peer Review Association American Medical Review Research Center Pharmaceutical manufacturers Generic Pharmaceutical Industry Association Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association Pharmaceutical research Center for the Study of Drug Development Pharmaceuticals, Generic Center for the Study of Drug Development Generic Pharmaceutical Industry Association Positron emission tomography American College of Nuclear Physicians Society of Nuclear Medicine Physical medicine American Academy of Physical Medicine Postmarketing surveillance Center for the Study of Drug Development United States Pharmacopoeial Convention Preferred provider organizations American Medical Care and Review Association Preventive medicine American College of Preventive Medicine Psychiatry American Psychiatric Association Psychosocial therapy American Psychiatric Association Public health American Public Health Association Pan American Health Association Quality assurance programs American Medical Care and Review Association American Medical Peer Review Association American Medical Review Research Center American Public Health Association Maryland Hospital Association Radiation therapy devices National Electrical Manufacturers Association Radiology American College of Nuclear Physicians Society of Nuclear Medicine Radiopharmaceuticals American College of Nuclear Physicians Society of Nuclear Medicine Rehabilitation American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation RESNA Association for the Advancement of Rehabilitation Technology 605

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MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT DIRECTORY Rheumatic diseases American Rheumatism Association Standards and specifications American National Standards Institute American Public Health Association American Society of Mechanical Engineers American Society for Testing and Materials Association for the Advancement of Medical In- strumentation National Electrical Manufacturers Association United States Pharmacopoeial Convention Strategic planning Institute for the Future Surgery Head American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Surgery Neck American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Surgery Orthopedic American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Technology assessment (general) Finnish Society of Technology Assessment in Health Care International Society of Technology Assess- ment in Health Care National Advisory Council on Health Care Technology Assessment Swedish National Center for Technology As- sessment in Health Care 606 Tissue banks American Association of Tissue Banks Tissue procurement American Association of Blood Banks American Association of Tissue Banks American Council on Transplantation United Network for Organ Sharing Transplantation American Council on Transplantation American Society of Transplant Physicians American Society of Transplant Surgeons United Network for Organ Sharing Ultrasound American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine Urology American Urological Association Renal Physicians Association Utilization review American Medical Review Research Center