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Appendix A About the Council on Health Care Technology Rosters of Council anc! Panels 631

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APPENDICES ABOUT THE COUNCIL ON HEALTH CARE TECHNOLOGY The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) is a private, non-profit organization estab- lished by federal charter in 1863 to provide advice to the government on matters of science. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) was established under the NAS charter in 1970 to conduct studies of policy issues related to health and medicine, acting both as an advisor to the federal government and on its own initiative. It is the responsibility of the IOM for establishing and operating the Council on Health Care Technology. The Council on Health Care Technology (CHCT) was established within the IOM in 1986 to promote the development and application of technology assessment in health care and to review health care technologies for their appropriate use. The council was mandated by the U.S. Congress in the Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Amendments of 1984 (P.L. 98-551) and by technical amendments made in 1985 (P.L. 99-117~. The functions of the council are: to serve as a clearinghouse for data and information sources related to health care technologies and technology assessments; to improve the methodologies, techniques, and procedures of technology assessment; to identify needs in assessment of technologies and the criteria for setting priorities among assess- ment needs; to stimulate, coordinate, and commission the assessment of health care technologies; and to promote related education, training, and technical assistance. The federal government provided the IOM with initial funding for the council in December 1985. The IOM appointed the council in March 1986, which met for the first time in April 1986. The council consists of 16 people who are experts on the safety, efficacy, effectiveness, appropriateness, and cost of health care technology, and who represent health professionals, hospitals and other health care providers, health care insurers, employers, consumers, and manufacturers of products for health care. The council established four panels, each of which has as many as 18 members with appropriate ranges of expertise, to help fulfill the council's responsibilities. The Evalua- tion Panel was established to address the council functions to identify and set priorities among assessment needs and to stimulate, coordinate, and commission assessments. The Information Panel oversees the development and operation of the information clearinghouse for health care technologies and assessments. The Methods Panel was established to improve the methods, techniques, and procedures of technology assess- ment and to promote education and training in the use of these approaches. The Federal Liaison Panel was established to maintain a strong relationship between the council and federal agencies with assessment programs and interests. Federal Liaison Panel members participate in activities of the council and other panels. Except for the 633

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MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT DIRECTORY Federal Liaison Panel, at least two members of the council serve on each of the panels. Council and panel members and their respective organizational affiliations are shown in the appendices. In addition to the activities of the panels, the council sponsors other matters of interest to the assessment community. The council's forum series consists of two-day sympo- siums linked by a common concern for major health policy issues that cut across the public and private sectors. They are invitational conferences held two or three times annually, organized to promote interaction among speakers and audience to encour- age the exchange of differing views without pressure to resolve differences. Themes for the first two forums in 1987 were Quality of Care and Technology Assessment and Care of the Elderly Patient: Policy Issues Ant Research Opportunities. Also in 1987, the IOM cospon- sored with the National Academy of Engineering a symposium entitled New Medical Devices: Factors Influencing Invention, Development, and Use. It addressed key economic, technical, and political factors expected to influence development and appropriate use of innovative medical devices during the coming decade. Published proceedings of that symposium will be available in early 1988. The council published its first issues of its CHCT Newsletter during 1986, and plans to continue publication quarterly. The newsletter reports current council activities, lists forthcoming conferences and events of interest to the assessment community, and describes recent report releases and other publications, and related developments of interest to the assessment community. Most issues include a profile of an assessment program similar to those in Part 1 of this Directory. The first annual report of the council, to cover activities through 1987, will be available in early 1988. The council is supported by contributions and grants from the private sector and by federal matching grants. Public Law 98-551 set aside up to $500,000 for the first year, $750,000 for the second year, and $750,000 for the third year in federal grants for initial, partial support of the council. These amounts were earmarked for the council in annual appropriations made by Congress for the National Center for Health Services Research and Health Care Technology Assessment (NCHSR), a component of the U.S. Public Health Service. According to the statute, granting of any portion or all of these funds was subject to matching requirements for financial support from the private sector. First year federal grant funds had to be matched by half their amount from other sources, i.e. two federal dollars for every non-federal dollar. Second and third year federal grants for operation of the council were to be matched by twice these amounts from private sector sources, i.e. one federal dollar for every two non-federal dollars. Thus, the activities of the council, including production of this Directory, have been supported in part by grant number HS 05526 from the NCHSR. Private sector contributors to the council include health insurers, medical professions organizations, health product makers, hospitals, health maintenance organizations, business groups, and other organizations served by the council and that participate in its activities. Other non-federal grant support is to include some cost-recovery on council products and services, such as this Directory. Also, the National Research Coun- cil, a component of the NAS, has provided program initiation support for certain activities. A list of contributors to the council is shown in Appendix B. In December 1987, the President signed the Public Health Service Amendments of 1987, (P.L. 100-177~. These amendments to the Public Health Service Act pertain in part to the Council on Health Care Technology, and extend the authority of the NCHSR, the National Center for Health Statistics, and other Public Health Service programs for fiscal years 1988, 1989, and 1990. 634

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APPENDICES The 1987 amendments affecting the council provide for the Secretary of Health and Human Services to make available up to $750,000 for the support and operation of the council in each of the three fiscal years. Awarding of these federal funds is contingent upon matching support from non-federal sources. The matching requirement for fiscal 1988 and 1989 is one federal dollar for one non-federal dollar; in fiscal 1990, the ratio is one federal dollar for every two non-federal dollars. In support of the 1987 legislation, the report of the Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources stated: "The Committee continues to support this program which it believes provides an important forum forjoint government and private cooperation to promote the development of methods of health care technology assessment." The House Committee on Energy and Commerce stated: "The Committee wishes to reaf- firm its support for the Council and its expectation that the Council will play a vital role in the development of health policy and improvements in the delivery of health care services. Federal health programs, and their beneficiaries, stand to benefit immensely from the activities of the Council, and the Federal government should continue to be an effective participant in the activities and funding of the Council." COUNCIL ON HEALTH CARE TECHNOLOGY WILLIAM N. HUBBARD, OR. former President, The Upjohn Company, Hickory Corners, Michigan (Chairman) JEREMIAH A. BARONDESS Irene F. and I. Roy Psaty Distinguished Professor of Clinical Medicine, Cornell University Medical College, New York, New York (Co-Chairman) HERBERT L. ABRAMS Professor of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California RICHARD E. BEHRMAN Dean, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio PAUL A. EBERT Director, American College of Surgeons, Chicago, Illinois PAUL S. ENTMACHER Senior Vice President and Chief Medical Director, Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, New York, New York MELVIN A. GLASSER Director, Health Security Action Council Washington, D.C. GERALD D. LAUBACH President, Pfizer Inc., New York, New York WALTER B. MAHER Director, Employee Benefits and Health Services, Chrysler Corporation, Detroit, Michigan ROBERT H. McCAFFREY Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, C.R. Bard Inc., Murray Hill, New Jersey LAWRENCE C. MORRIS Senior Vice President, Health Benefits Management, Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, Chicago, Illinois FREDERICK MOSTELLER Roger I. Lee Professor, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts MARY O. MUNDINGER Dean, School of Nursing, Columbia University, New York, New York ANNE A. SCITOVSKY Chief, Health Economics Department, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Palo Alto, California 635

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MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT DIRECTORY C. THOMAS SMITH President, Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, Connecticut GAIL L. WARDEN President and Chief Executive Officer, Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound, Seattle, Washington EVALUATION PANEL OF THE COUNCIL ON HEALTH CARE TECHNOLOGY GEORGE E. THIBAULT Associate Chief of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (Chairman' CHERYL F. AUSTEIN Director, Division of Science and Public Health Policy, Office of Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, D.C. JEREMIAH A. BARONDESS Irene F. and I. Roy Psaty Distinguished Professor of Clinical Medicine, Cornell University Medical College, New York, New York KATHLEEN BUTO Deputy Director, Bureau of Eligibility, Reimbursement, and Coverage, Health Care Financing Administration, Baltimore, Maryland H. TRISTRAM ENGELHARDT, JR. Professor of Medicine and Community Medicine, Center for Ethics, Medicine and Public Issues, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas PAUL S. ENTMACHE11 Senior Vice President and Chief Medical Director, Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, New York, New York BERNADINE MEALY Chairman, Research Institute, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio 636 ROGER C. HEADMAN Assistant Director, Health and Life Sciences Division, Office of Technology Assessment, U.S. Congress, Washington, D.C. GERALD D. LAUBACH President, Pfizer Inc., New York, New York ROBERT H. McCAFFREY Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, C.R. Bard Inc., Murray Hill, New Jersey MARY O. MUNDINGER Dean, School of Nursing, Columbia University, New York, New York SEYMOUR PERRY Deputy Director, Institute for Health Policy Analysis, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, D.C. CHARLES E. PHELPS Professor of Political Science, Director, Public Policy Analysis Program, Department of Political Science, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York MICHAEL F. ROIZEN Professor and Chairperson, Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois HAROLD C. SOX Associate Chief of Staff for Ambulatory Care, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Palo Alto, California

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APPENDICES EARL P. STEINBERG Assistant Professor of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland J DONALD A. YOUNG Executive Director, Prospective Payment Assessment Commission, Washington, D.C. JOHN C. VILLFORTH Director, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, Rockville, Maryland INFORMATION PANEL OF THE COUNCIL ON HEALTH CARE TECHNOLOGY LAWRENCE C. MORRIS Senior Vice President, Health Benefits Management, Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, Chicago, Illinois (Chairman GAIL L. WARDEN President and Chief Executive Officer, Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound, Seattle, Washington (Co-Ch~tirmanJ MORRIS F. COLLEN Consultant, Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program, Oakland California RICHARD C. FARMER Chairman, Division of Medicine, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio MELVIN A. GLASSER Director, Health Security Action Council, Washington, D.C. G. MAX K. HUGHES Vice President, Systems and Communication, Pfizer Pharmaceuticals, New York, New York RICHARD J. JOHNS Massey Professor and Director, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University and Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland DONALD A.B. LINDBERG Director, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland WALTER B. MAHER Director, Employee Benefits and Health Services, Chrysler Corporation, Detroit, Michigan JOHN H. MOXLEY, III President, MetaMedical Inc., Beverly Hills, California C. THOMAS SMITH President, Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, Connecticut GEORGE E.T. STEBBING Director, Professional Activities, Office of the Secretary of Defense, Health Affairs, Washington, D.C. 637

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MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT DIRECTORY METHODS PANEL OF THE COUNCIL ON HEALTH CARE TECHNOLOGY FREDERICK MOSTELLER Roger I. Lee Professor, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts (Chmirman) HERBERT L. ABRAMS Professor of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (ChairmanJ RICHARD E. BEHRMAN Dean, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio PAUL A. EBERT Director, American College of Surgeons, Chicago, Illinois DAVID M. EDDY Center for Health Policy Research and Education, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina SUSAN D. HORN Associate Director, Center for Hospital Finance and Management, Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland BRYAN LUCK Senior Research Scientist, Battelle Human Affairs Research Centers, Washington, D.C. JAY MOSKOWITZ Associate Director for Program Planning and Evaluation, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland ANNE A. SCITOVSKY Chief, Health Economics Department, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Palo Alto, California WALTER O. SPITZER Professor and Chair, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec STEPHEN B. THACKER Assistant Director for Science, Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Georgia ELEANOR TRAVERS Chairman, Task Force on Technology Assessment, Veterans Administration, Washington, D.C. NORMAN W. WEISSMAN Director, Division of Extramural Research, National Center for Health Services Research and Health Care Technology Assessment, Rockville, Maryland FEDERAL LIAISON PANEL OF THE COUNCIL ON HEALTH CARE TECHNOLOGY ROGER C. HEADMAN Assistant Director, Health and Life Sciences Division, Office of Technology Assessment, U.S. Congress, Washington, D.C. (Chairman, CHERYL F. AUSTEIN Director, Division of Science and Public Health Policy, Office of Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, D.C. 638 KATHLEEN AUTO Deputy Director, Bureau of Eligibility, Reimbursement, and Coverage, Health Care Financing Administration, Baltimore, Maryland I. MICHAEL FITZMAURICE Director, National Center for Health Services Research and Health Care Technology Assessment, Rockville, Maryland

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APPENDICES JANET KLINE Director, Health Section, Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. DONALD A.B. LINDBERG Director, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland JAY MOSKOWITZ Associate Director for Program Planning and Evaluation, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland GEORGE E.T. STEBBING Director, Professional Activities, Office of the Secretary of Defense, Health Affairs, Washington, D.C. STEPHEN B. THACKER Assistant Director for Science, Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Georgia ELEANOR TRAVERS Chairman, Task Force on Technology Assessment, Veterans Administration, Washington, D.C. JOHN C. VILLFORTH Director, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, Rockville, Maryland DONALD A. YOUNG Executive Director, Prospective Payment Assessment Commission, Washington, D.C. 639

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