Appendix C
Committee to Review the Desalination and Water Purification Technology Roadmap

David H. Marks is the Morton and Claire Goulder Family Professor of Engineering Systems and Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is also the director for the Laboratory for Energy and the Environment and coordinator for the Alliance for Global Sustainability at MIT. Dr. Marks' research interests include the organization and management of large-scale infrastructure systems with concern for the anticipation and mitigation of larger-scale environmental and economic impacts. He has served on numerous NRC committees, chaired the Steering Committee on Cooperation in Urban Water Management, and was a member of the Board on Radioactive Waste Management. Dr. Marks also served as chair of the U.S. Office of Technology Assessment's Oversight Committee on Superfund Study. He is the recipient of the ASCE Huber Research Prize. Dr. Marks received his B.S.C.E. and M.S. in environmental engineering from Cornell University and his Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Johns Hopkins University.


Miriam Balaban is the founder and editor-in-chief of Desalination, the international journal on the science and technology of water desalting and purification and has served in this position for over thirty-seven years. She founded and edits the Desalination Directory, an on-line database of literature in the areas of water purification and desalination and of individuals and organizations active in the field. She is the secretary general of the European Desalination Society and has served on the Board of Directors of the International Desalination Association. Ms. Balaban received her B.S. in chemistry from the University of Pennsylvania, is now professor and program coordinator of the L’Aquila University Master’s course in desalination. She is president of the International Federation of Science Editors, has served as professor and dean of the School for Scientific Communication, Mario Negri Sud Institute for Biomedical and Pharmacological Research, Italy and is a research associate at the Center for Philosophy and History of Science, Boston University.


B. Anatole Falagan is an assistant manager for the Water Resources Management Group at the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. The Group oversees long-range water resources planning and program development for Metropolitan's service area as well as the Colorado River and State Water Project supplies. Mr. Falagan has over twenty years of experience in civil engineering planning and design in water resources. He also leads Metropolitan’s Seawater Desalination Program, focusing on both research and development of seawater desalination plants. He received his B.S. and M.S. in civil



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Review of the Desalination and Water Purification Technology Roadmap Appendix C Committee to Review the Desalination and Water Purification Technology Roadmap David H. Marks is the Morton and Claire Goulder Family Professor of Engineering Systems and Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is also the director for the Laboratory for Energy and the Environment and coordinator for the Alliance for Global Sustainability at MIT. Dr. Marks' research interests include the organization and management of large-scale infrastructure systems with concern for the anticipation and mitigation of larger-scale environmental and economic impacts. He has served on numerous NRC committees, chaired the Steering Committee on Cooperation in Urban Water Management, and was a member of the Board on Radioactive Waste Management. Dr. Marks also served as chair of the U.S. Office of Technology Assessment's Oversight Committee on Superfund Study. He is the recipient of the ASCE Huber Research Prize. Dr. Marks received his B.S.C.E. and M.S. in environmental engineering from Cornell University and his Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Johns Hopkins University. Miriam Balaban is the founder and editor-in-chief of Desalination, the international journal on the science and technology of water desalting and purification and has served in this position for over thirty-seven years. She founded and edits the Desalination Directory, an on-line database of literature in the areas of water purification and desalination and of individuals and organizations active in the field. She is the secretary general of the European Desalination Society and has served on the Board of Directors of the International Desalination Association. Ms. Balaban received her B.S. in chemistry from the University of Pennsylvania, is now professor and program coordinator of the L’Aquila University Master’s course in desalination. She is president of the International Federation of Science Editors, has served as professor and dean of the School for Scientific Communication, Mario Negri Sud Institute for Biomedical and Pharmacological Research, Italy and is a research associate at the Center for Philosophy and History of Science, Boston University. B. Anatole Falagan is an assistant manager for the Water Resources Management Group at the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. The Group oversees long-range water resources planning and program development for Metropolitan's service area as well as the Colorado River and State Water Project supplies. Mr. Falagan has over twenty years of experience in civil engineering planning and design in water resources. He also leads Metropolitan’s Seawater Desalination Program, focusing on both research and development of seawater desalination plants. He received his B.S. and M.S. in civil

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Review of the Desalination and Water Purification Technology Roadmap engineering from Stanford University, and he has an M.B.A. from the University of California, Irvine. Joseph G. Jacangelo is the manager of Municipal Technology for Montgomery Watson Harza (MWH), an international firm specializing in energy, infrastructure, water and wastewater issues. He also serves as the manager of the MWH Global Water Knowledge Center, and in this position he is responsible for water technology, application, and transfer. Dr. Jacangelo is an adjunct associate professor at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health and director of the Center for Water and Health. He is the vice chair of the Membrane Processes Committee of the American Water Works Association and chairs the International Water Association Disinfection Committee. Dr. Jacangelo received his B.A. from Rutgers University and his Ph.D. in environmental health engineering from Johns Hopkins University. Kimberly L. Jones is an associate professor of civil engineering at Howard University. Her research interests include physical-chemical treatment processes, membrane processes, adsorption, mass transport, interfacial phenomenon, water and wastewater treatment plant design, and water quality. Dr. Jones is a member of the American Water Works Association, the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors, the International Water Association, and the Water Environment Federation. She was recently named one of the "Top Women in Science" by the National Technical Association. Dr. Jones received her B.S. and M.S. in civil engineering from Howard University and University of Illinois, respectively, and received her Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Johns Hopkins University. William J. Koros is the Roberto C. Goizueta Chair for Excellence in Chemical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research interests include gas and liquid separations using membrane and barrier materials; formation and application of polymeric, ceramic, and carbon membranes; and structure-permeability relationships. Dr. Koros is editor-in-chief of the Journal of Membrane Science, board member of the North American Membrane Society, and managing editor for their newsletter, Membrane Quarterly. He received the National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award and the American Institute of Chemical Engineers' Clarence G. Gerhold Award and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Koros received all of his degrees (B.S., M.S., and Ph.D.) in chemical engineering from the University of Texas. John Letey, Jr. is a Distinguished Professor in the department of soil and environmental sciences at the University of California, Riverside. He is the director of the University of California’s Center for Water Resources, which supports water-related research and seeks to develop ecologically-sound and economically efficient water management policies and programs in California. His research interests include agriculture management under saline conditions, soil structure and infiltration, chemical transport through soil, and cooperative studies with resource economists to establish economically optimal management strategies. Dr. Letey is a fellow of the Soil Science Society of America, American Society of Agronomy, and the American Association for Advancement of Science. He is a current member of the Water Science and Technology Board. He received his B.S. in agronomy from Colorado State University and his Ph.D. in soil physics from the University of Illinois. Thomas M. Pankratz is vice president for CH2M Hill's Global Water Group, with a focus on business development in international desalination and water reuse projects. He

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Review of the Desalination and Water Purification Technology Roadmap has over twenty-five years of experience in the fields of water, desalination, and reuse and has participated in the development of some of the world's largest and most technically advanced desalination projects. Previously, he was the corporate projects director for Vivendi/US Filter, also concentrating on desalination and water-reuse projects. From 1991-1997, Mr. Pankratz served as the Middle East regional manager for Aqua-Chem Inc. He serves on the board of directors for the International Desalination Association and is a member of the European Desalination Association. He received his B.A. degree in business administration from Landford University. Richard H. Sakaji is a senior sanitary engineer at the California State Department of Health Services, Division of Drinking Water and Environmental Management. In this position, he reviews testing protocols for new water and wastewater treatment processes to ensure the technology meets accepted treatment standards, and he develops policy for water-treatment processes and indirect potable reuse applications. In previous roles at DHS, Dr. Sakaji designed water-quality studies and helped develop water-quality regulations. He has also worked as an engineer for the East Bay Municipal Utility District and Alameda County Water District. Dr. Sakaji is a member of the American Chemical Society, the American Water Works Association, and the American Institute for Chemical Engineers. He received his A.B. in biological sciences, M.S. in sanitary engineering, and Ph.D. in civil engineering all from the University of California, Berkeley. Charles D. Turner is a professor of civil engineering at the University of Texas, El Paso. His primary research interests include membrane processing of brackish groundwater and surface water, desalting concentrate utilization, and membrane processes for reduction of disinfection by-products. He has also conducted research in water and wastewater treatment, water economics, and water reuse. Dr. Turner is a member of numerous professional societies, including the American Society of Civil Engineers, the American Society of Engineering Education, and the Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in civil engineering from the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, and his Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Colorado State University. Mark Wilf is vice president of corporate technology at Hydranautics, a firm specializing in membrane separations. In this position, he oversees development of membrane products and designs and evaluates commercial reverse osmosis plants. He has more than 25 years of experience in the membrane technology and desalination field. Before joining Hydranautics, he served as head of membrane products at Mekorot Water Co. Ltd., in Tel Aviv, Israel. Dr. Wilf was a member of the Research Advisory Council, which advised the Middle East Desalination Research Center on its research priorities. He is also a member of the International Desalination Association and the American Water Works Association. He received his Ph.D. in chemistry at Technior - Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa.

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Review of the Desalination and Water Purification Technology Roadmap National Research Council Staff Stephanie E. Johnson is a program officer with the Water Science and Technology Board. Since joining the NRC in 2002, she has served as study director for three committees, including the Panel to Review the Critical Ecosystem Studies Initiative and the Panel on Water System Security Research. She received her B.A. from Vanderbilt University in chemistry and geology, and her M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental sciences from the University of Virginia on the subject of pesticide transport and microbial bioavailability in soils. Her research interests include contaminant transport, aqueous geochemistry, and hydrogeology. Mark C. Gibson is a program officer at the NRC’s Water Science and Technology Board (WSTB). After joining the NRC in 1998, he directed the Committee on Drinking Water Contaminants that released three reports, culminating with Classifying Drinking Water Contaminants for Regulatory Consideration in 2001. He is directing the Committee on Indicators for Waterborne Pathogens for the Board on Life Sciences and the WSTB, and the Committee on Water Quality Improvement for the Pittsburgh Region and Committee on Assessing and Valuing the Services of Aquatic and Related Terrestrial Ecosystems for the WSTB. Mr. Gibson received his B.S. in biology from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and his M.S. in environmental science and policy in biology from George Mason University. Jon Q. Sanders is a senior program assistant with the Water Science and Technology Board. He holds a B.A. in anthropology from Trinity University. He is a member of the Society for Applied Anthropology and the American Indian Science and Engineering Society. Mr. Sanders has worked on a variety of projects at the WSTB ranging from assessment of the Corps of Engineers’ methods of analysis and peer review for water resources project planning to Everglades restoration. He is coauthor of “Sitting Down at the Table: Mediation and Resolution of Water Conflicts” (2001). Jon’s research interests include political ecology, Texas water issues, and environmental decision making.