5-2

 

Cost details underlying estimates for 10 current hydrogen supply technologies in Figure 5-1,

 

52

5-3

 

Unit cost estimates for 11 possible future hydrogen supply technologies, including generation by dedicated nuclear plants,

 

53

5-4

 

Cost details underlying estimates in Figure 5-3 for 11 future hydrogen supply technologies, including generation by dedicated nuclear plants,

 

54

5-5

 

Unit cost estimates for four current and four possible future electrolysis technologies for the generation of hydrogen,

 

55

5-6

 

Unit cost estimates for three current and three possible future natural gas technologies for hydrogen generation,

 

55

5-7

 

Unit cost estimates for two current and two future possible coal technologies for hydrogen generation,

 

56

5-8

 

Unit cost estimates for two current and two possible future biomass-based technologies for hydrogen generation,

 

56

5-9

 

Estimates of unit atmospheric carbon release per kilogram of hydrogen produced by 10 current hydrogen supply technologies,

 

59

5-10

 

Estimates of unit atmospheric carbon release per kilogram of hydrogen produced by 11 future possible hydrogen supply technologies, including generation by dedicated nuclear plants,

 

59

5-11

 

Unit carbon emissions (kilograms of carbon per kilogram of hydrogen) versus unit costs (dollars per kilogram of hydrogen) for various hydrogen supply technologies,

 

61

5-12

 

Estimates of well-to-wheels energy use (for 27 miles-per-gallon conventional gasoline-fueled vehicles [CFVs]) with 10 current hydrogen supply technologies,

 

61

5-13

 

Estimates of well-to-wheels energy use (for 27 miles-per-gallon conventional gasoline-fueled vehicles [CFVs]) with 11 possible future hydrogen supply technologies, including generation by dedicated nuclear plants,

 

62

6-1

 

Demand in the optimistic vision created by the committee: postulated fraction of hydrogen, hybrid, and conventional vehicles, 2000–2050,

 

67

6-2

 

Postulated fuel economy based on the optimistic vision of the committee for conventional, hybrid, and hydrogen vehicles (passenger cars and light-duty trucks), 2000–2050,

 

67

6-3

 

Light-duty vehicular use of hydrogen, 2000–2050, based on the optimistic vision of the committee,

 

68

6-4

 

Gasoline use by light-duty vehicles with or without hybrid and hydrogen vehicles, 2000–2050, based on the optimistic vision of the committee,

 

68

6-5

 

Gasoline use cases based on the committee’s optimistic vision compared with Energy Information Administration (EIA) projections of oil supply, demand, and imports, 2000–2050,

 

69

6-6

 

Projections by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the volume of carbon releases, by sector and by fuel, in selected years from 1990 to 2025,

 

70

6-7

 

Estimated volume of carbon releases from passenger cars and light-duty trucks: current hydrogen production technologies (fossil fuels), 2000–2050,

 

71

6-8

 

Estimated volume of carbon releases from passenger cars and light-duty trucks: possible future hydrogen production technologies (fossil fuels and nuclear energy), 2000–2050,

 

71

6-9

 

Estimated volume of carbon releases from passenger cars and light-duty trucks: current hydrogen production technologies (electrolysis and renewables), 2000–2050,

 

72

6-10

 

Estimated volume of carbon releases from passenger cars and light-duty trucks: possible future hydrogen production technologies (electrolysis and renewables), 2000–2050,

 

72



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