B
Committee Membership

Kenneth O. MacFadden, Chair, is an Independent Consultant in Research and Analytical Management. Prior to this he was Vice President of Advanced Materials and Devices at Honeywell, Inc. In this position MacFadden was responsible for the materials and sensors research in the Corporate Research Laboratories at Honeywell. Before taking this psition in 1997, he was Vice President, Research Division at W.R. Grace & Co., where he was responsible for Analytical Research and for new product and process development in electrochemistry, bioproducts, catalysis, and polymer products. As director of analytical research, a position he assumed in 1984, he was responsible for corporate analytical support to the research division. This support included chemical and physical characterization of organic, inorganic, and biochemical materials, and compositional analysis. Other previous positions include Manager, Industrial Chemicals Research and Manager, Analytical Services at Air Products & Chemicals Inc. In the latter unit, services provided included routine chemical and physical analysis of polymers, methods development, mass spectrometric analysis, corrosion testing, polymer characterization, and environmental methods development. He has served on the Committee of Corporation Associates of the American Chemical Society and was a member of the NRC Panel for Chemical Science and Technology from 1992 to 1997 and served as Vice Chair (1995) and Chair (1996) of that panel. He was also Chair for the NRC Panel for NIST Services in 2002. He is nominated as chair because of his background in analytical chemistry, his experience running an analytical chemistry unit, and his demonstrated success in chairing NRC activities.

>

A. Welford Castleman, Jr. (NAS), a member of the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technologies, received a B.Ch.E. from Rensselaer Polytechnic Insti-



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Forensic Analysis Weighing Bullet Lead Evidence B Committee Membership Kenneth O. MacFadden, Chair, is an Independent Consultant in Research and Analytical Management. Prior to this he was Vice President of Advanced Materials and Devices at Honeywell, Inc. In this position MacFadden was responsible for the materials and sensors research in the Corporate Research Laboratories at Honeywell. Before taking this psition in 1997, he was Vice President, Research Division at W.R. Grace & Co., where he was responsible for Analytical Research and for new product and process development in electrochemistry, bioproducts, catalysis, and polymer products. As director of analytical research, a position he assumed in 1984, he was responsible for corporate analytical support to the research division. This support included chemical and physical characterization of organic, inorganic, and biochemical materials, and compositional analysis. Other previous positions include Manager, Industrial Chemicals Research and Manager, Analytical Services at Air Products & Chemicals Inc. In the latter unit, services provided included routine chemical and physical analysis of polymers, methods development, mass spectrometric analysis, corrosion testing, polymer characterization, and environmental methods development. He has served on the Committee of Corporation Associates of the American Chemical Society and was a member of the NRC Panel for Chemical Science and Technology from 1992 to 1997 and served as Vice Chair (1995) and Chair (1996) of that panel. He was also Chair for the NRC Panel for NIST Services in 2002. He is nominated as chair because of his background in analytical chemistry, his experience running an analytical chemistry unit, and his demonstrated success in chairing NRC activities.> A. Welford Castleman, Jr. (NAS), a member of the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technologies, received a B.Ch.E. from Rensselaer Polytechnic Insti-

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Forensic Analysis Weighing Bullet Lead Evidence tute in 1957 and his Ph.D. (1969) degree at the Polytechnic Institute of New York. He has been on the staff of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (1958–1975), Adjunct Professor in the Departments of Mechanics and Earth and Space Sciences, State University of New York, Stony Brook (1973–1975), and Professor of Chemistry and Fellow of CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder (1975–1982). In 1982 he accepted a professorship in the Department of Chemistry at The Pennsylvania State University, and was given the distinction of the Evan Pugh Professor title in 1986. In 1999 Professor Castleman was appointed Eberly Distinguished Chair in Science and a joint professor in the Department of Physics. He is a member of the Materials Research Institute at Penn State and is currently on the Advisory Board of the Consortium for Nanostructured Materials (VCU). Castleman’s awards and honors include election to the National Academy of Sciences (1998), Fellow of the American Academy for Arts and Sciences (1998), Fellow of the New York Academy of Sciences (1998), Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1985) and the American Physical Society (1985), receipt of the Wilhelm Jost Memorial Lectureship Award from the German Chemical Society (2000), Fulbright Senior Scholar (1989), American Chemical Society Award for Creative Advances in Environmental Science and Technology (1987), Doktors Honoris Causa from the University of Innsbruck, Austria (1987), U.S. Senior Scientist von Humboldt Awardee (1986), Senior Fellow of the Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science (1985, 1997) and Sherman Fairchild Distinguished Scholar at Cal Tech (1977). He is currently serving on the editorial boards of a number of professional publications. Peter R. DeForest is Professor of Criminalistics at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York where he has taught for 33 years. Prior to joining the faculty and helping to found the Forensic Science B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. Programs at John Jay and the City University of New York, he worked in several laboratories. He began his career in forensic science at the Ventura County Sheriff’s Crime Laboratory, Ventura, California in 1960. He earned a Bachelor of Science Degree (1964) in Criminalistics and a Doctor of Criminology Degree in Criminalistics (1969) from the University of California at Berkeley. In addition to his university teaching and research activities, he also serves as a scientific consultant and expert witness for police departments, prosecutors’ offices, municipal law departments, public defender agencies, and private attorneys in criminal and civil casework. He is the author or co-author of several book chapters, a textbook, and numerous articles in scientific journals. In addition to membership in several scientific societies, he is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Forensic Sciences. For over ten years, dating from the inception of the American Board of Criminalistics (ABC), Dr. De Forest served as the chairman of ABC Examination Committee, which was responsible for designing and administering certification examinations in a range of forensic

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Forensic Analysis Weighing Bullet Lead Evidence science specialties. He has presented lectures and workshops for several professional societies and in other universities and has served as Visiting Professor at the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland. During the fall 1997 semester he served as Exchange Professor with the National Crime Faculty at the Police Staff College, Bramshill, England. Awards received include the Paul L. Kirk Award of the Criminalistics Section of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences. M. Bonner Denton is Professor of Chemistry at the University of Arizona. His research interests include applying the latest technological advances in electronics, physics, optics, astronomy, acoustics, mechanical engineering and computer science toward developing new and improved spectroscopic instrumentation and analytical methods. His multifaceted but strongly interlocking program ranges from new frontiers of mass and plasma emission spectrometry through intelligent instrumentation. Professor Denton received a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry and a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Lamar University in Beaumont, Texas. He then attended the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana, receiving his Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry. His awards include an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship, an Outstanding Young Men of America Award, the 1989 ACS Division of Analytical Chemistry Award in Chemical Instrumentation, the 1991 Society of Applied Spectroscopy’s Lester Strock Award, and the Spectroscopic Society of Pittsburgh’s 1998 Spectroscopy Award. He has served on the Advisory Board of Analytical Chemistry and on the Editorial Advisory Board of the Journal of Automatic Chemistry, he was President of the Society for Applied Spectroscopy, and he has been appointed an Associate Editor for Applied Spectroscopy. Charles A. Evans, Jr., is a consultant, recently retired from Charles Evans & Associates. This company specialized in materials analysis using microanalytical techniques such as secondary ion mass spectrometry, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, and Auger electron spectrometry. Before starting his own company, Evans held other positions as an analytical chemist, including that of professor of chemistry. He is a member of the American Chemical Society, the American Society of Mass Spectrometry, and the Microbeam Analytical Society. Evans earned both his B.A. (1964) and Ph.D. (1968) in chemistry at Cornell University. Michael O. Finkelstein has a private practice specializing in statistical methods in law and civil litigation. He is also a Lecturer at the Columbia University Law School, where he teaches statistics for lawyers. Finkelstein has also been adjunct faculty at Harvard Law School, New York University Law School, and Yale Law School. He is Editor of The Review of Securities and Commodities Regulation and The Review of Banking and Financial Services, and has written

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Forensic Analysis Weighing Bullet Lead Evidence four books including Quantitative Methods in Law and Statistics for Lawyers. Finkelstein was the Chairman of the Committee on Empirical Data in Legal Decision-making for the Association of the Bar of the City of New York (1977–83) and is a Member of the American Statistical Association. He served on the NAS Committee on Statistical Assessments as Evidence in Courts (1982). Finkelstein earned his A.B. from Harvard University and his J.D. from Harvard Law School. Paul C. Giannelli, Professor of Law, has been a member of Case Western Reserve University’s School of Law faculty since 1975 and has twice been named Teacher of the Year. He also taught at the Judge Advocate General’s School, was a Fellow in the Forensic Medicine Program of the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology & George Washington University Forensic Science Program, and served as both prosecutor and defense counsel in the General Courts-Martial Jurisdiction in the Armed Forces. A prominent expert on scientific evidence, Professor Giannelli is a frequent lecturer throughout the country, and his work has been cited in hundreds of court opinions and legal articles, including the decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court. His publications in the area of criminal law, juvenile law, evidence, and particularly scientific evidence are extensive, including coauthoring nine books, dozens of articles, and chapters in books. He authors a “Scientific Evidence” column for Criminal Justice and a column on “Forensic Science” for the Criminal Law Bulletin. Professor Giannelli is a fellow of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences and serves as Counsel for the Rules of Evidence, Ohio Supreme Court Rules Advisory Committee. Robert R. Greenberg is Supervisory Research Chemist and Leader of the Nuclear Methods Group, Analytical Chemistry Division at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The Nuclear Methods Group is at the forefront of basic and applied research into high accuracy nuclear analytical techniques. Greenberg is heavily involved in the development of nuclear methods for chemical analysis, the evaluation of the sources of error and uncertainties for these analytical techniques, and the development of Standard Reference Materials certified for chemical content. Greenberg earned his B.S. in chemistry from Brooklyn College (City University of New York) and his Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Maryland. James A. Holcombe is the Chair of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Texas, Austin. Holcombe’s research interest centers on improvements in trace metal analysis and speciation at the ultratrace level. He also is interested in understanding basic processes that are taking place in complex analytical atomic spectroscopic techniques in an effort to improve and expand their capabilities. His ability to draw from different areas of chemistry to attack the problem under study characterizes his program. In particular his group

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Forensic Analysis Weighing Bullet Lead Evidence focuses on two main areas: design of bimolecular-based chelators and electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Holcombe has been editor-in-chief of Applied Spectroscopy and has played active roles in both the American Chemical Society and the Society for Applied Spectroscopy. He earned a B.A. from Colorado College in 1970 and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1974. Karen Kafadar is a Professor of Mathematics at the University of Colorado-Denver. Her research interests include robust methods; exploratory data analysis; spatial statistics; and applications in physical, engineering, and biomedical sciences. She has previously held positions as Assistant Professor, Department of Statistics at Oregon State University; Mathematical Statistician at the National Bureau of Standards; and Mathematical Statistician at Hewlett Packard Company, and was a fellow in the Biometry Branch, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control of the National Cancer Institute. Kafadar was Editor of Technometrics (1999–2001) and won the 2001 William G. Hunter Award from the Statistics Division of the American Society for Quality, “for excellence in statistics as a communicator, a consultant, an educator, an innovator, an integrator of statistics with other disciplines, and an implementer who obtains meaningful results.” Kafadar is also a Fellow of the American Statistical Association. She earned both her B.S. in mathematics and her M.S. in statistics from Stanford University in 1975, and her Ph.D. in statistics from Princeton University in 1979. Charles J. McMahon, Jr. (NAE) received his undergraduate degree in Metallurgical Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania in 1955 and his doctorate from MIT in Physical Metallurgy in 1963, after three years of service as a line officer in the U.S. Navy. He has been a member of the faculty of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania since 1964 and has spent sabbaticals at the General Electric Research and Development Center; as an Overseas Fellow at Churchill College, Cambridge University; and as a Humboldt Awardee at the Institute of Metal Physics, University of Goettingen. His research centers on metals and alloys, specifically on interfacial fracture of structural materials. McMahon also has investigated using multimedia techniques in education. Steven R. Prescott is currently Manager, Analytical Sciences Division, at Hercules Inc. He is responsible for the Corporate Analytical Division, providing support to R&D, manufacturing, technical service, and regulatory groups. The Division consists of 15 laboratories involved with chemical and biological analysis, spectroscopy, separations, and materials characterization. Prior to accepting this job in 1999, Prescott was the Section Head of the Corporate Analytical Department with BetzDearborn. The mission of the Department was to provide problem solving and analytical support to the water treatment, pulp and paper,

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Forensic Analysis Weighing Bullet Lead Evidence and metals processing industries. At W.R. Grace & Co., Prescott held the positions of Construction Products Product Line Manager and Water Treatment Product Line Manager, in which he developed products for the construction and water treatment industries, respectively. He was also Manager-Analytical Research, involved with the chemical characterization of organic, inorganic and biological materials. Prescott earned his B.A. at Franklin and Marshall College in 1974 and his Ph.D. from The Pennsylvania State University in 1979. Clifford Spiegelman is Professor of Statistics and Toxicology at Texas A&M University. His current research interests include calibration curves, nonparametric curve fitting, and applications of statistics, particularly to chemistry. He also serves as Adjunct Professor of Chemistry at Lamar University and previously held positions at Texas A&M University and in the Statistical Engineering Division of the National Bureau of Standards. Spiegelman serves as Section Editor for chemometrics in the Wiley Encyclopedia of Environmetrics, sat on the board of the Journal of Chemometrics, and held a number of positions within the American Statistical Association. He was awarded the ASA Section on the Environment’s Distinguished Achievement Award in 1994. Spiegelman earned a B.S. in economics, math, and statistics from the State University of New York, Buffalo, in 1970; an M.S. in managerial economics from Northwestern University in 1973; and a Ph.D. in statistics and applied mathematics from Northwestern University in 1976. Raymond S. Voorhees oversees the research and examination programs and activities of the Physical Evidence Section, U.S. Postal Inspection Service, which is responsible for nationwide crime scene response, including bombings. He also continues to work as a forensic analyst, performing chemical, instrumental, and microscopic examinations of physical evidence, and testifying about the results of such work. Before joining the U.S. Postal Inspection Service in 1983, he spent 13 years with the Metropolitan Police Department of Washington, D.C. He served previously on the NRC Committee on Tagging Black and Smokeless Powder. Voorhees earned his B.S. in Administration of Justice from American University and his M.A. in Forensic Science at the Antioch School of Law.