Click for next page ( 68


The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 67
Appendixes

OCR for page 67

OCR for page 67
Appendix A Committee Member Biographical Sketches JOHN B. CARBERRY, Chair, is director of environmen- tal technology for the DuPont Company in Wilmington, Delaware, where he has been employed since 1965. He is responsible for recommendations on technical programs for DuPont based on an analysis of environmental issues. He is also responsible for a team to obtain world class, affordable, publicly acceptable environmental treatment technologies. Since 1988 he has led this function, shifting its emphasis to waste prevention and product stewardship while maintain- ing excellence in treatment. Mr. Carberry is a fellow of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, a registered pro- fessional engineer, a founding member of the Green Power Market Development Group, a founding member of the Chemical Industry Vision2020 Technology Partnership and chair of its technology committee, and a member of the NAE Committees on Metrics for Evaluating Global Warming Re- search and Novel Technologies for Sequestering CO2. He holds an M.S. in chemical engineering from Cornell Univer- sity and an M.B.A. from the University of Delaware. RICHARD ,1. AYEN, Vice Chair, who is also a member of the NRC Committee on Review and Evaluation of Alterna- tive Technologies for Demilitarization of Assembled Chemi- cal Weapons (I and II), received his Ph.D. in chemical engi- neering from the University of Illinois. Dr. Ayen, now retired, was director of technology for Waste Management, Inc. He managed all aspects of Waste Management's Clemson Technical Center, including treatability studies and demonstrations of technology for the treatment of hazardous and radioactive waste. His experience includes 20 years at Stauffer Chemical Company, where he was manager of the Process Development Department at Stauffer' s Eastern Re- search Center. Dr. Ayen has published extensively in his fields of interest. He has extensive experience in the evalua- tion and development of new technologies for the treatment of hazardous, radioactive, industrial, and municipal waste. 69 JUDITH A. BRADBURY, a technical manager at Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, is experienced in the practice of public involvement and research into this topic. She is currently responsible for public involvement in the seismic study of the Ohio River Valley that is examining the feasibility of carbon sequestration. Dr. Bradbury recently completed an evaluation of public involvement programs across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Be- fore that she completed a series of evaluations of the effec- tiveness of DOE's 12 site-specific advisory boards and led an assessment of community concerns about incineration and community perspectives on the U.S. Army Chemical Weap- ons Disposal Program. She earned a B.S. in sociology from the London School of Economics, an M.A. in public affairs from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and a Ph.D. in public and international affairs from the University of Pitts- burgh. She has expertise in public involvement issues. MARTIN GOLLIN, an independent consultant affiliated with Carmagen Engineering, Inc., has over 20 years of experi- ence in process engineering and management of capital projects, risk assessment, process safety, loss prevention, and product development. From 1988 to 1999 he served as pro- cess design manager and principal engineer at ARCO Chemi- cal Co., where he developed the design basis for a catalytic incinerator system that has served as a design model for sub- sequent plants. He was also EM & S manager for a $1 billion grass-roots project. He earned B.S. and M.S. degrees in chemi- cal engineering from Loughborough University of Tech- nology. Mr. Gollin has expertise in process design and process safety. FREDERICK T. HARPER is a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff, High Consequence Assessment and Tech- nology Department at Sandia National Laboratories in Albu- querque, New Mexico. He manages and performs research

OCR for page 67
70 on the effects of chemical and biological releases from ex- plosive and nonexplosive dissemination mechanisms and explosive aerosolization of nuclear materials from nuclear weapons and other nuclear sources. Dr. Harper has served as the U.S. delegate to numerous international and national working groups in the field of probabilistic risk assessment and consequence analysis and developed computer codes for toxicological and radiological consequence assessment and accident progression. Dr. Harper earned a bachelor' s degree from Yale University in physics, a master's degree from the University of Virginia in nuclear engineering, and a doctor- ate, also in nuclear engineering, from the University of New Mexico. He is a member of Tau Beta Pi, the American Physi- cal Society, and the American Nuclear Society. PAUL F. KAVANAUGH is an engineering and construc- tion management consultant. Previously, he was the director of government programs for Rust International, Inc., and di- rector of strategic planning for Waste Management Environ- mental Services. In the Army, he served with the Army Corps of Engineers, the Department of Energy, and the Defense Nuclear Agency, and managed projects at the U.S. Army Chemical Demilitarization Program at Johnston Atoll. He earned a B.S. in civil engineering from Norwich University and an M.S. in civil engineering from Oklahoma State Uni- versity. He is a member of Chi Epsilon, a registered profes- sional engineer, and a fellow in the Society of American Mili- tary Engineering. His expertise is in military and civil works design and construction. TODD A. KIMMELL is principal investigator in the Envi- ronmental Assessment Division at Argonne National Labo- ratory. He is an environmental scientist and policy analyst. Mr. Kimmell is nominated for membership on the commit- tee for his expertise as an environmental regulatory and per- mitting specialist with 25 years of extensive experience in solid and hazardous waste management, program and policy development, chemical munitions and explosives waste, and cleanup programs as well as in many other activities related to regulatory and permitting issues. He graduated from the George Washington University with a master's degree in environmental science. DOUGLAS M. MEDVILLE retired from MITRE as pro- gram leader for chemical materiel disposal and remediation. He has led many analyses of risk, process engineering, trans- portation, and alternative disposal technologies and has briefed the public and senior military officials on the results. Mr. Medville led the evaluation of the operational perfor- mance of the Army's chemical weapon disposal facility on Johnson Atoll and directed an assessment of the risks, public perceptions, environmental aspects, and logistics of trans- porting recovered non-stockpile chemical warfare materiel to candidate storage and disposal destinations. Before that, he worked at Franklin Institute Research Laboratories and APPENDIX A General Electric. Mr. Medville earned a B.S. in industrial engineering and an M.S. in operations research, both from New York University. GEORGE W. PARSHALL (NAS) is a consultant for E.I. Du Pont de Nemours & Company, having retired from there in 1992 after a career at the company spanning nearly 40 years. From 1979, he served as director of chemical science in Central Research and Development. Dr. Parshall is a past member of the NRC Board on Chemical Science and Tech- nology and has taken part in earlier NRC chemical demilita- rization studies. He continues to play an active role in National Research Council activities. He graduated from the University of Illinois with a Ph.D. in organic chemistry. His experience is in organic and inorganic chemistry and cataly- sis and in conducting and supervising chemical research. JAMES P. PASTORICK is president of Geophex UXO, Ltd., an unexploded ordnance (UXO) consulting firm based in Alexandria, Virginia, that specializes in UXO planning and management consulting to state and foreign govern- ments. Since he retired from the U.S. Navy as an explosives ordnance disposal officer and diver in 1989, he has been working on civilian UXO clearance projects. Prior to start- ing his present company, he was the senior project manager for UXO projects at UXB International, Inc., and the IT Group. He is an unexploded ordnance technician with over 17 years of experience in explosive ordnance disposal. Mr. Pastorick is a member of the UXO Working Group of the Interstate Technology Regulatory Council and has been re- sponsible for management and supervision of numerous projects concerning investigation and remediation of sites contaminated with unexploded ordnance. His expertise is in explosive ordnance handling, transport, disassembly, and disposal. LEONARD M. SIEGEL is director of the Center for Public Environmental Oversight, Mountain View, California, an advocate of public participation in the oversight of military environmental programs and federal facilities cleanup and revitalization and a project of the Tides Center. He is one of the environmental movement's leading experts on military base contamination and serves on the National Environmen- tal Justice Advisory Council Federal Facilities Working Group, the U.S. EPA's Negotiated Rulemaking Committee on All Appropriate Inquiry, and the Moffett Field Restora- tion Advisory Board. He has served on the Defense Science Board Task Force on Unexploded Ordnance, the Federal Facilities Environmental Restoration Dialogue Committee, and the Subcommittee on Waste and Facility Siting of the National Environmental Justice Advisory Committee. Mr. Siegel edits Citizens Report on the Military and the Environ- ment, and his organization conducts an Internet forum on military environmental issues.

OCR for page 67
APPENDIX A WILLIAM I. WALSH is an attorney in the Washington, D.C., office of Pepper Hamilton LLP and was made partner in 1989. Prior to joining Pepper, he was section chief in the EPA Office of Enforcement. His legal experience encom- passes environmental advice and environmental injury liti- gation on a broad spectrum of issues pursuant to a variety of environmental statutes, including the Resources Conserva- tion and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). He represents trade associations, in- cluding the American Dental Association and the Rubber Manufacturers Association, in rule making and other public policy advocacy; represents individual companies in envi- ronmental actions (particularly in negotiating cost-effective 71 remedies in pollution cases involving water, air, and hazard- ous waste); and advises technology developers and users on taking advantage of the incentives for, and eliminating the regulatory barriers to, the use of innovative environmental technologies. He previously served on NRC committees con- cerned with Superfund and RCRA corrective action pro- grams, Navy remediation sites, the use of appropriate scien- tific groundwater models in environmental regulatory programs, and non-stockpile chemical weapons disposal and related activities. Mr. Walsh holds a J.D. from George Wash- ington University Law School and a B.S. in physics from Manhattan College. His expertise is in environmental and regulatory law.