APPENDIX B

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Theodore Moran (Chair) holds the Marcus Wallenberg Chair at the School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University, where he teaches and conducts research at the intersection of international economics, business, foreign affairs, and public policy. He is founder of the Landegger Program in international business diplomacy and serves as director in providing courses on international business government relations and negotiations to some 600 undergraduate and graduate students each year. His most recent books include Beyond Sweatshops: Foreign Direct Investment, Globalization, and Developing Countries (2002) and Parental Supervision: The New Paradigm for Foreign Investment and Development (2001). From 1993-1994 he served as senior adviser for economics on the policy planning staff of the U.S. Department of State, where he had responsibility for trade, finance, technology, energy, and environmental issues. He is a consultant to the United Nations, to governments in Asia and Latin America, and to the international business and financial communities. In 2000 he was appointed counselor to the Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA) of the World Bank Group. He holds a Ph.D. degree from Harvard University.


Jarl Bengtsson is a consultant and former counselor and head of the Center for Educational Research and Innovation at the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) in Paris. At OECD, he directed a wide-ranging research program on such issues as lifelong learning, the school-to-work transition, the links between education and eco-



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Monitoring International Labor Standards: Techniques and Sources of Information APPENDIX B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Theodore Moran (Chair) holds the Marcus Wallenberg Chair at the School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University, where he teaches and conducts research at the intersection of international economics, business, foreign affairs, and public policy. He is founder of the Landegger Program in international business diplomacy and serves as director in providing courses on international business government relations and negotiations to some 600 undergraduate and graduate students each year. His most recent books include Beyond Sweatshops: Foreign Direct Investment, Globalization, and Developing Countries (2002) and Parental Supervision: The New Paradigm for Foreign Investment and Development (2001). From 1993-1994 he served as senior adviser for economics on the policy planning staff of the U.S. Department of State, where he had responsibility for trade, finance, technology, energy, and environmental issues. He is a consultant to the United Nations, to governments in Asia and Latin America, and to the international business and financial communities. In 2000 he was appointed counselor to the Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA) of the World Bank Group. He holds a Ph.D. degree from Harvard University. Jarl Bengtsson is a consultant and former counselor and head of the Center for Educational Research and Innovation at the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) in Paris. At OECD, he directed a wide-ranging research program on such issues as lifelong learning, the school-to-work transition, the links between education and eco-

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Monitoring International Labor Standards: Techniques and Sources of Information nomic development, and sustainable development, and he led the analysis of education statistics and indicators, particularly as they relate to analysis of human and social capital. Prior to joining OECD, he was a professor of education at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, and adviser to the Swedish Minister of Education. He is a member of several international groups analyzing education and the economy. He has published many articles and books on education and its links to the economy and society. Maria S. Eitel is vice president and senior adviser for corporate responsibility at Nike, Inc., where she provides strategic direction for Nike’s corporate responsibility initiatives, including labor practices and compliance, environmental affairs, and global community involvement. Formerly she served as European corporate affairs group manager for Microsoft Corporation, where she managed corporate, public, and community affairs initiatives. Before joining Microsoft in 1995, she was director of public affairs for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. She is a director of the Operating Council of the Global Alliance for Workers & Communities and a member of the Leaders Group of Business for Social Responsibility. She holds a B.A. degree from McGill University and an M.S. degree from Georgetown University. Kimberly Ann Elliott is a research fellow at the Institute for International Economics and has a joint appointment with the Center for Global Development. Her research and writing focuses on various aspects of U.S. trade policy and, more broadly, on globalization. She has also written about the causes and consequences of transnational corruption and the efficacy of economic sanctions and trade threats. Her most recent book, with Richard B. Freeman, is Can Labor Standards Improve Under Globalization? (2003). Gary S. Fields is a professor in the Department of Labor Economics, chair of the Department of International and Comparative Labor in the School of Industrial and Labor Relations, and professor in the Department of Economics in the College of Arts and Sciences, all at Cornell University. Previously, he was in the Department of Economics and at the Economic Growth Center at Yale University. His research interests are in the areas of poverty, inequality, and economic development, labor market models of developing countries, economic mobility in the United States and France, the microeconomics of income distribution, employment and earnings dynamics in South Africa, and labor economics for managers. His most recent

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Monitoring International Labor Standards: Techniques and Sources of Information books are Distribution and Development: A New Look at the Developing World (2001) and, coedited with Guy Pfeffermann, Pathways Out of Poverty (2003). He holds B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees in economics from the University of Michigan. Thea M. Lee is assistant director for international economics in the Public Policy Department of the AFL-CIO, where she oversees research on international trade and investment policy. Previously she worked as an international trade economist at the Economic Policy Institute in Washington, DC, and as an editor at Dollars & Sense magazine in Boston. Her research projects include reports on the North American Free Trade Agreement and on the impact of international trade on the domestic steel and textile industries. She has testified before several committees of the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate on various trade topics, and she has also appeared on the MacNeil-Lehrer News Hour, C-Span, CNN, and numerous radio programs. She holds a B.A. degree from Smith College and an M.A. degree in economics from the University of Michigan. Lisa M. Lynch is academic dean and William L. Clayton Professor of international economic affairs at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and the Economic Policy Institute. From 1995-1997 she was the chief economist at the U.S. Department of Labor, and she has been a faculty member at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Ohio State University, and the University of Bristol. She is also a member of the Federal Economic Statistics Advisory Board and the Academic Advisory Board for the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. She has published more than 50 papers and books on issues ranging from the impact of technological change and workplace practices (especially training) on productivity and wages to determinants of youth unemployment and the school-to-work transition. Dr. Lynch has worked extensively with issues on survey design and methodology associated with large longitudinal surveys of households and firms. She holds a B.A. degree with honors from Wellesley College and M.Sc. and Ph.D. degree in economics from the London School of Economics. Dara O’Rourke is assistant professor in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management at the University of California at Berkeley. Previously, he lived and worked in Vietnam, where he continues to conduct research. He has worked for the United Nations in Thailand and

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Monitoring International Labor Standards: Techniques and Sources of Information as a consultant to the U.N. Industrial Development Organization, the U.N. Development Program, the World Bank, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on cleaner production, industrial ecology, and sustainable development issues. His current research focuses on systems for monitoring multinational firms’ environmental and labor practices and new strategies of information-based regulation and public disclosure. He holds a B.S. degree in mechanical engineering and political science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. degree from the University of California at Berkeley. Howard Pack is professor of business and public policy, economics, and management at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. He is currently evaluating the effects of government economic intervention in selected Asian countries and analyzing productivity in African manufacturing. He is a consultant to the World Bank on industrial development policies in Asia and Africa. Previously, he was a professor at Swarthmore College and at Yale University. The author of numerous books and articles on industrialization, trade, foreign aid, and exports, he is on the board of editors of the Journal of Development Economics and World Bank Research Observer. He holds a B.A. degree in business administration from the City College of New York and a Ph.D. degree from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Edward E. Potter, an expert in international employment law, represents foreign and domestic companies, as well as the U.S. Council for International Business. He serves as the U.S. employer delegate to the annual International Labour Organization Conference and is a member of various federal panels dealing with international worker rights. He is president of the Employment Policy Foundation, a leading economic policy research organization that analyzes workplace trends and policies. He is coauthor of Keeping America Competitive: Employment Policy for the 21st Century (1995). He is a member of the Tripartite Advisory Panel on International Labor Standards and a member of the District of Columbia Bar and the American Bar Association. He holds a B.A. degree from Michigan State University (Phi Beta Kappa), an M.S. degree from Cornell University, and a J.D. degree from the Washington College of Law, American University. S.M. (Mo) Rajan is an independent consultant. Previously, he was with Levi Strauss & Co. for over 25 years in various positions. As director of

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Monitoring International Labor Standards: Techniques and Sources of Information labor and human rights issues in the Worldwide Government Affairs and Public Policy Department, he was responsible for developing policy positions related to labor and human rights and representing the company to external stakeholders, including officials in the U.S. government, governments in Central and Latin America, and selected countries in Asia, on public policy issues relating to labor and human rights issues, trade initiatives, and intellectual property protection. Earlier, he served as director of global code of conduct compliance, partnering with regional managers to implement the company’s code of conduct in facilities operated by business partners throughout the world. He also spent extended periods of time in India, Argentina, Indonesia, and Singapore as operations director, responsible for starting up international company affiliates. He holds an M.B.A. degree from St. Mary’s College (California) and a Ph.D. degree in chemical engineering from the University of Washington. Gare A. Smith heads the corporate social responsibility and risk management practice at the law firm of Foley Hoag in Washington, DC. He advises nations and multinational companies on legal, political, and economic aspects of globalization, including the development and implementation of codes of conduct, compliance programs, and monitoring systems. Previously, he was vice president for external affairs at Levi Strauss & Co., where he supervised global implementation of Levi’s code of conduct. He has also served as principal deputy assistant secretary in the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor; as U.S. Representative to the International Labor Organization; and as senior foreign policy adviser and counsel to Senator Edward M. Kennedy. He serves on the boards of a number of human and labor rights organizations. He holds a B.A. degree from Johns Hopkins University (Phi Beta Kappa) and a J.D. degree from the University of Michigan Law School. Auret van Heerden is executive director of the Fair Labor Association (FLA), a nonprofit organization established to protect the rights of workers in the United States and worldwide. The FLA grew out of the Apparel Industry Partnership, a diverse group of manufacturers, consumer groups, labor and human rights organizations, and U.S. universities working together to address labor rights standards. As a student, he served two terms as president of the National Union of South African Students and was an anti-apartheid activist in South Africa; he was forced into exile in 1987 following long periods of solitary confinement and torture. After the elec-

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Monitoring International Labor Standards: Techniques and Sources of Information tion of the first democratic government in South Africa, he served as labor attaché in the South African Permanent Mission in Geneva. He twice worked for the International Labour Organization, first in the Equality Rights Branch and later as coordinator of an action program on social and labor issues in export processing zones. He holds a B.A. degree (honors) from the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, where he majored in industrial sociology and political science. Fahrettin Yagci is lead economist for the Africa region at the World Bank. Previously, he worked at the World Bank in research and in operations in India, Bangladesh, Zimbabwe, Zambia, Ethiopia, Malaysia, Yugoslavia, and Turkey. His areas of expertise include macroeconomics, public-sector economics, decentralization, and trade policy. Before joining the World Bank, he taught economics at Bosphorus University in Istanbul. He has also served as consultant to the Istanbul Chamber of Commerce and worked for the Turkish government. He holds a Ph.D. degree from the London School of Economics.

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