Appendix B
Committee and Staff Biographies

Larry A. Mayer (Chair), University of New Hampshire. Larry Mayer earned his Ph.D. at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. He is currently director of the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping and co-director of the Joint Hydrographic Center at the University of New Hampshire. Dr. Mayer’s research interests include sonar imaging, remote classification of the seafloor, and applications of visualization techniques to problems of ocean mapping. He has participated in more than 45 cruises during the past 20 years and has been chief or co-chief scientist of numerous expeditions, including two legs of the Ocean Drilling Program. He is a recent recipient of the Keen Medal in Marine Geology, was a member of the President’s Panel on Ocean Exploration, and was recently awarded an honorary doctorate from the University of Stockholm.

Rear Admiral Kenneth E. Barbor, International Hydrographic Bureau. Rear Admiral Kenneth Barbor earned his M.S. in meteorology and oceanography at the Naval Postgraduate School. He currently serves as director of the International Hydrographic Bureau. RDML Barbor was the inaugural director of the Hydrographic Science Research Center at the University of Southern Mississippi, a part of the Department of Marine Science located at the Stennis Space Center. He retired from the U.S. Navy after a 28-year career that included assignments as commander of the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command, directing the Navy’s operational hydrography, oceanography, and meteorology activities; commanding officer of a hydrographic survey unit and two meteorology and oceanography forecast units; and headquarter staff tours with the



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A Geospatial Framework for the Coastal Zone: National Needs for Coastal Mapping and Charting Appendix B Committee and Staff Biographies Larry A. Mayer (Chair), University of New Hampshire. Larry Mayer earned his Ph.D. at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. He is currently director of the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping and co-director of the Joint Hydrographic Center at the University of New Hampshire. Dr. Mayer’s research interests include sonar imaging, remote classification of the seafloor, and applications of visualization techniques to problems of ocean mapping. He has participated in more than 45 cruises during the past 20 years and has been chief or co-chief scientist of numerous expeditions, including two legs of the Ocean Drilling Program. He is a recent recipient of the Keen Medal in Marine Geology, was a member of the President’s Panel on Ocean Exploration, and was recently awarded an honorary doctorate from the University of Stockholm. Rear Admiral Kenneth E. Barbor, International Hydrographic Bureau. Rear Admiral Kenneth Barbor earned his M.S. in meteorology and oceanography at the Naval Postgraduate School. He currently serves as director of the International Hydrographic Bureau. RDML Barbor was the inaugural director of the Hydrographic Science Research Center at the University of Southern Mississippi, a part of the Department of Marine Science located at the Stennis Space Center. He retired from the U.S. Navy after a 28-year career that included assignments as commander of the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command, directing the Navy’s operational hydrography, oceanography, and meteorology activities; commanding officer of a hydrographic survey unit and two meteorology and oceanography forecast units; and headquarter staff tours with the

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A Geospatial Framework for the Coastal Zone: National Needs for Coastal Mapping and Charting Oceanographer of the Navy and Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command. Paul R. Boudreau, Bedford Institute of Oceanography. Paul Boudreau received his M.S. in ecology from Dalhousie University. He is currently manager of the Habitat Management Division of the Canadian Department of Fisheries and Oceans. Mr. Boudreau’s research interests include habitat and population production in freshwater, estuarine, and marine ecosystems and environmental impact assessment, which includes development, application, and analysis associated with mapping marine benthic habitats. He holds numerous committee positions, including membership on the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea Working Group on Marine Habitat Mapping. Thomas S. Chance, C&C Technologies. Thomas Chance received his M.S. degrees in geodesy and industrial administration from Purdue University. He is founder and president of C&C Technologies, a hydrographic and land-surveying company headquartered in Lafayette, Louisiana. Mr. Chance is a member of the Hydrographic Society, the Institute of Navigation, the Society of American Military Engineers, and the Marine Technology Society. His expertise includes surveying for the submarine telecommunications industry, the offshore oil industry, and the U.S. government (including NOAA and the USGS). Mr. Chance served on the President’s Panel for Ocean Exploration. He also participated in the Global Ocean-floor Mapping Project workshop. Charles H. Fletcher, University of Hawaii. Charles Fletcher received his Ph.D. in geology, with a concentration in coastal sedimentology and Pleistocene-Holocene sea level change, from the University of Delaware. Dr. Fletcher is currently a professor of geology and geophysics in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) at the University of Hawaii. His research interests include coastal sedimentary geology, which focuses on sediment budgets, sea-level history, erosion and accretion patterns, hazards, shelf sedimentation, and coastal zone management. Dr. Fletcher also has an interest in carbonate reefs, reef history, remote sensing, and habitat mapping. In 2001, Dr. Fletcher received the Robert W. Clopton Award for Outstanding Service to the Community. Holly Greening, Tampa Bay Estuary Program. Holly Greening received her M.S. from Florida State University. She has been a senior scientist at the Tampa Bay National Estuary Program since 1991. Ms. Greening’s responsibilities include coordinating state, federal, and university researchers and resource managers investigating impacts to the natural

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A Geospatial Framework for the Coastal Zone: National Needs for Coastal Mapping and Charting resources of Tampa Bay. Her research interests include freshwater inflow, atmospheric deposition, and watershed management. Ms. Greening recently served on the NRC Committee on Causes and Management of Coastal Eutrophication and serves on the Governing Board of the Estuarine Research Federation. Rongxing Li, Ohio State University. Rongxing Li received his Ph.D. in photogrammetry and remote sensing from the Technical University of Berlin. He is currently a professor of geoinformation and geodetic science at Ohio State University. His research interests include Geographic Information Systems, Land Information Systems, photogrammetry, remote sensing, and applications involving coastal mapping, environmental monitoring and transportation. Dr. Li is a certified photogrammist and a member of the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing. He is also a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers and the American Geophysical Union. Curt Mason, Private Consultant. Curt Mason received his B.S. from Oregon State University and his M.S. in physical oceanography from Texas A&M University. From 1997 until his retirement in 2001, Mr. Mason served as a senior coastal oceanographer for NOAA. His primary areas of expertise include beach erosion, coastal storm impacts, and tidal inlet hydrodynamic and sedimentary processes. During his 36 years as a coastal oceanographer for the federal government, he led a major Corps of Engineers research program on tidal inlets, in addition to establishing and directing the Corps of Engineers Field Research Facility. Mr. Mason served as a program director in the NOAA National Sea Grant Program and Coastal Ocean Program offices; led the establishment of and served as deputy director for the NOAA Coastal Services Center, coordinated major budget initiatives within NOAA and the Department of Commerce on national disaster reduction (for which he received the department’s Bronze Medal in 1998), and served as the NOAA/USGS liaison for science interactions and budget initiatives. He recently served on the National Academies Committee to Review the USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program. Susan Snow-Cotter, Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management. Susan Snow-Cotter received her M.A. in marine affairs from the University of Washington. She holds a B.A. in political science with an emphasis in environmental politics from the University of Massachusetts/Amherst. Ms. Snow-Cotter is currently the assistant director at the Executive Office of Environmental Affairs for Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management. She has 15 years of experience with ocean resource management including aquaculture, habitat mitigation, regulatory review of coastal

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A Geospatial Framework for the Coastal Zone: National Needs for Coastal Mapping and Charting and ocean development, and exotic species planning and management. Ms. Snow-Cotter represents Massachusetts on several regional and national programs including the Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment, the Minerals Management Service’s Outer Continental Shelf Policy Committee and the Northeast Aquatic Nuisance Species Panel. Dawn J. Wright, Oregon State University. Dawn Wright received her Ph.D. in physical geography and marine geology from the University of California, Santa Barbara, in 1994. She is currently a professor of geography and oceanography at Oregon State University. Dr. Wright’s research interests include geographic information science, marine geography, tectonics of mid-ocean ridges, and the processing and interpretation of high-resolution bathymetric, video, and underwater photographic images. She has completed oceanographic fieldwork in some of the most geologically active regions of the planet, including the East Pacific Rise, the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the Juan de Fuca Ridge, the Tonga Trench, volcanoes under the Japan Sea and the Indian Ocean, and has dived three times in the Alvin submersible. Dr. Wright serves on the board of directors of the University Consortium for Geographic Information Science, and has recently edited the books Marine and Coastal Geographical Information Systems (Taylor & Francis, 2000) and Undersea with GIS (ESRI Press, 2002). Staff David A. Feary has been a senior program officer with the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources since 1999, where he also has responsibility for the Committee on Seismology and Geodynamics. He earned his Ph.D. at the Australian National University before a 15-year period as a research scientist with the marine program at the Australian Geological Survey Organisation. During this time he participated in numerous research cruises—many as chief or co-chief scientist—and most recently was co-chief scientist for Ocean Drilling Program Leg 182. His research activities have focused on the role of climate as a primary control on carbonate reef formation. Terry Schaefer was a program officer with the Ocean Studies Board from August 2001 until October 2003. Terry received his Ph.D. in oceanography and coastal sciences from Louisiana State University in 2001 and a master’s degree in biology/coastal zone studies from the University of West Florida in 1996. In 1998, Terry served as a John A. Knauss Marine Policy fellow in the Office of the Chief Scientist, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. During his time with the Ocean Studies Board he directed the study Science and its Role in the National Marine Fisheries Service

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A Geospatial Framework for the Coastal Zone: National Needs for Coastal Mapping and Charting (2002). Previously, Terry worked for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Park Service, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the U.S. Forest Service. Dr. Schaefer’s interests include recruitment dynamics of marine populations, experimental statistics, coastal zone management, and marine policy. Yvonne Forsbergh was a research assistant for the Board on Earth Science and Resources. Previously, she was a program analyst for the Office of Grants and Special Programs at Howard Hughes Medical Institute for both the Precollege Science Education Program and the Graduate Science Education Program. She has also held a position with the Board on Science and Technology for International Development as consultant and program administrator. She holds a B.S. from the University of Tennessee in microbiology and education, and she is currently a M.Ed. candidate at George Mason University in instructional technology. Byron Mason is a senior project assistant for the Division on Earth and Life Studies. He received a B.A. in anthropology from the University of Florida. During his time at the NRC he has assisted with the completion of two reports: Implementing Climate and Global Change Research (2004) and A Geospatial Framework for the Coastal Zone: National Needs for Coastal Mapping and Charting (2004). Alison Schrum was a project assistant with the Ocean Studies Board through much of 2002, where she was primarily involved with organizational aspects of the National Needs for Coastal Mapping and Charting study.