Appendix E
Committee Biographical Information

ERNEST T. SMERDON, Chair, recently retired as vice-provost and dean of the College of Engineering and Mines at the University of Arizona. Dr. Smerdon has served as an advisor to the U.S. federal government and several foreign governments on water resources and agricultural development issues for four decades. He has authored over 100 professional papers on water resources planning, engineering, and irrigation. He has also served on several National Research Council committees and boards. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Smerdon received his B.S. degree, his M.S. degree, and his Ph.D. degree, all in engineering, from the University of Missouri, Columbia.

RICHARD M. ADAMS is a professor of agricultural and resource economics at Oregon State University. Prior service includes assistant and associate professor, University of Wyoming. He has served as editor of the American Journal of Agricultural Economics and associate editor for Water Resources Research and the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management. He is a member of various government committees dealing with climate change and air and water pollution. His current research focuses on the economic effects of air and water pollution, implications of climate change for agriculture and water resources, and tradeoffs between agricultural activity and environmental quality. Dr. Adams received his B.S. degree in resource management, his M.S. degree in agricultural economics, and his Ph.D. degree from the University of California, Davis.

DONALD W. CHAPMAN is a consulting biologist who lives in Eagle, Idaho. He was an inland fishery and stock assessment biologist with U.N. FAO in Cartagena, Colombia, and Kigoma, Tanzania. Earlier he was a professor and fishery unit leader at the University of Idaho and a visiting professor at Montana State University and the University of Wisconsin. He formerly was



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Managing the Columbia River: Instream Flows, Water Withdrawals, and Salmon Survival Appendix E Committee Biographical Information ERNEST T. SMERDON, Chair, recently retired as vice-provost and dean of the College of Engineering and Mines at the University of Arizona. Dr. Smerdon has served as an advisor to the U.S. federal government and several foreign governments on water resources and agricultural development issues for four decades. He has authored over 100 professional papers on water resources planning, engineering, and irrigation. He has also served on several National Research Council committees and boards. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Smerdon received his B.S. degree, his M.S. degree, and his Ph.D. degree, all in engineering, from the University of Missouri, Columbia. RICHARD M. ADAMS is a professor of agricultural and resource economics at Oregon State University. Prior service includes assistant and associate professor, University of Wyoming. He has served as editor of the American Journal of Agricultural Economics and associate editor for Water Resources Research and the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management. He is a member of various government committees dealing with climate change and air and water pollution. His current research focuses on the economic effects of air and water pollution, implications of climate change for agriculture and water resources, and tradeoffs between agricultural activity and environmental quality. Dr. Adams received his B.S. degree in resource management, his M.S. degree in agricultural economics, and his Ph.D. degree from the University of California, Davis. DONALD W. CHAPMAN is a consulting biologist who lives in Eagle, Idaho. He was an inland fishery and stock assessment biologist with U.N. FAO in Cartagena, Colombia, and Kigoma, Tanzania. Earlier he was a professor and fishery unit leader at the University of Idaho and a visiting professor at Montana State University and the University of Wisconsin. He formerly was

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Managing the Columbia River: Instream Flows, Water Withdrawals, and Salmon Survival director of research for the Oregon Fish Commission, executive secretary of the Oregon State Water Resources Research Institute, and coordinator of the Alsea Watershed Study. His research interests include catch and stock assessment, anadromous fish passage problems, habitat evaluations, salmonid ecology, and fishery resource management. He received his B.S. degree in forest management and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in fisheries from Oregon State University. DARRELL G. FONTANE is director of the International School for Water Resources and a professor in the civil engineering department at Colorado State University. His research interests include water resources decision support systems, computer-aided water management, and integrated water quantity and quality management. As director of the International School for Water Resources, he organizes nondegree programs for international engineers in various aspects of water resources engineering. His responsibilities also include graduate teaching and research in water resources systems analysis and computerized decision support systems. Dr. Fontane received his B.S. degree in civil engineering from Louisiana State University, his M.S. degree in civil engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology, and his Ph.D. degree in civil engineering from Colorado State University. ALBERT E. GIORGI is president and senior fisheries scientist at BioAnalysts, Inc., in Redmond, Washington. Dr. Giorgi has been conducting research on Pacific Northwest salmonid resources since 1982. Previously, he conducted research in marine invertebrate ecology and marine fish life history. In his capacity as a salmon biologist he specializes in migratory behavior, juvenile salmon survival studies, biological effects of hydroelectric development and operation, and population modeling. Dr. Giorgi’s clients include the Bonneville Power Administration; Northwest Power Planning Council; Corps of Engineers; Chelan, Douglas, and Grant County Public Utility Districts; and several engineering firms including CH2M Hill, Dames and Moore, Harza, HDR, INCA, and Montgomery Watson. He received his B.A. and M.A. degrees in biology from Humboldt State University and his Ph.D. degree in fisheries from the University of Washington. HELEN M. INGRAM is a professor of social ecology and the Drew, Chace and Erin Warmington Chair in the Social Ecology

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Managing the Columbia River: Instream Flows, Water Withdrawals, and Salmon Survival of Peace and International Cooperation at the University of California, Irvine. Her research interests include transboundary national resources, particularly on the U.S.-Mexico border, water resources and equity, public policy design and implementation, and the impact of policy on democracy and public participation. Dr. Ingram received her Ph.D. degree from Columbia University. W. CARTER JOHNSON is a professor of ecology in the Deparment of Horticulture, Forestry, Landscape, and Parks at South Dakota State University in Brookings, South Dakota. Before his post at South Dakota State University, Dr. Johnson was with the Department of Biology at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Dr. Johnson’s research interests are in streamflow regulation and riparian ecosystems, restoration of ecological and economic sustainability of western rangelands, and global climate change and prairie wetlands. He received the W.S. Cooper Award in 1996 from the Ecological Society of America. Dr. Johnson served as a member of the National Research Council Committee on the Missouri River Ecosystem Science. He received received his B.S. degree in biology from Augustana College and his Ph.D. degree in botany from North Dakota State University. JOHN J. MAGNUSON is professor emeritus of zoology and limnology at the University of Wisconsin. He is past director of the university’s Center for Limnology and North Temperate Lakes Long-term Ecological Research Program. Dr. Magnuson’s research interests include long-term regional ecology, climate change effects on lake ecological systems, fish and fisheries ecology, and community ecology of lakes as islands. He received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees from the University of Minnesota and his Ph.D. degree in zoology with a minor in oceanography from the University of British Columbia. STUART W. MCKENZIE is retired from the U.S. Geological Survey. While with the USGS in Maryland, he studied the saltwater interface movement in Maryland coastal streams and long-term trends of water quality in Delaware. When at the University of Delaware, he helped assess groundwater resources in the Dover area. In Oregon he has studied quality of urban runoff and impacts of agricultural runoff on streams and worked on the Willamette River Quality Assessment, Yakima River Basin Water Quality Assessment, and Intergovernmental Task Force on Monitoring Water Quality. He is currently compiling and evalu-

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Managing the Columbia River: Instream Flows, Water Withdrawals, and Salmon Survival ating water temperature data from across the Columbia River. He received his B.S. degree in physics from the University of Puget Sound and his MCE degree in civil engineering from the University of Delaware. DIANE M. MCKNIGHT is a professor in the Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering and a fellow of the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research at the University of Colorado. Dr. McKnight was a research scientist at the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division. She studies biogeochemical processes, aquatic ecology, and reactive solute transport in streams and lakes in the Rocky Mountains and in polar desert areas of Antarctica. Dr. McKnight is the acting president of the biogeosciences section of American Geological Union. She is currently a member of U.S. Global Climate Research Program and International Panel on Climate Change committees on climate change and water resources. Her research interests are in limnology and biogeochemical processes in natural waters. She received her B.S. degree in mechanical engineering, her M.S. degree in civil engineering, and her Ph.D. degree in environmental engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. TAMMY J. NEWCOMB is the Lake Huron basin coordinator for the Michigan Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Division in Lansing, Michigan. In this position she coordinates ecosystem and watershed management for the Lake Huron drainages and the Lake Huron sport, tribal, and commercial fisheries. Dr. Newcomb is also an adjunct faculty member at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University with a research focus on salmonid population dynamics, watershed and stream habitat management, and stream temperature modeling. Dr. Newcomb received her Ph.D. degree from Michigan State University. KENNETH K. TANJI is professor emeritus of hydrologic science in the Department of Land, Air and Water Resources at the University of California, Davis. He is a fellow of three professional societies. His major research interest is on water quality aspects of irrigation and drainage. Dr. Tanji has served on three previous National Research Council committees. He received his B.A. degree in chemistry from the University of Hawaii, Honolulu, his B.S. and M.S. degrees in soil science from the

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Managing the Columbia River: Instream Flows, Water Withdrawals, and Salmon Survival University of California, Davis, and his Sc.D. degree in agricultural science from Kyoto University, Japan. JOHN E. THORSON is an administrative law judge with the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) in San Francisco. An attorney, Thorson was special master for the Arizona General Stream Adjudication. He has served as regional counsel for the Western Governors’ Conference, director of the Conference of Western Attorneys General, consultant to many state governments and courts; and director of the Missouri River Management Project for the Northern Lights Institute. Dr. Thorson received his B.A. degree from the University of New Mexico, his J.D. degree in 1973 from the University of California, Berkeley, and his doctorate in public administration from the University of Southern California. STAFF JEFFREY W. JACOBS is a senior program officer with the National Research Council’s Water Science and Technology Board. His research interests include policy and organizational arrangements for water resources management and the use of scientific information in water resources decision making. He has studied these issues extensively in both the United States and mainland Southeast Asia. Since joining the NRC in 1997, he has served as study director for 13 study committees. He received his B.S. degree from Texas A&M University, his M.A. degree from the University of California, Riverside, and his Ph.D. degree from the University of Colorado. DAVID POLICANSKY is the associate director of the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology at the National Research Council. Formerly, he taught and did research at the University of Chicago, the University of Massachusetts at Boston, and the Grey Herbarium of Harvard University. He was visiting scientist at the national Marine Fisheries Service Northeast Fisheries Center. He is a member of the Ecological Society of America, the American Fisheries Society, and the advisory councils to the University of Alaska’s School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences and the University of British Columbia’s Fisheries Centre. He was a member of the editorial board of Bioscience. His interests include genetics, evolution, and ecology, particularly the

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Managing the Columbia River: Instream Flows, Water Withdrawals, and Salmon Survival effects of fishing on fish populations, ecological risk assessment, and natural resource management. He received his B.A. in biology from Stanford University and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in biology from the University of Oregon. ELLEN A. DE GUZMAN is a research associate with the National Research Council’s Water Science and Technology Board. She has worked on a number of studies including Privatization of Water Services in the United States, Review of the USGS National Water Quality Assessment Program, and Drinking Water Contaminants (Phase II). She co-edits the WSTB newsletter and annual report and manages the WSTB homepage. She received her B.A. degree from the University of the Philippines.