Appendix B
Biographical Sketches

Lawrence D.Brown (Chair) is the Miers Busch professor in the Department of Statistics at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Previously, he has held faculty positions at Cornell University, Rutgers University, and the University of California, Berkeley. A theoretical statistician, his primary area of research interest is mathematical statistics, in particular, statistical decision theory, complete class theorems, admissibility and minimaxity of estimators and tests, sequential analysis, and the foundations of statistics (properties of conditionality and ancillarity). He was elected to membership in the National Academy of Sciences in 1990. At the National Research Council (NRC), he is currently a member of the Panel to Review the 2000 Census. He has a B.S. from the California Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. from Cornell University.

John L.Adams is senior statistician at the RAND Corporation in Santa Monica, California. His recent research areas include measurement of the quality of health care in view of outcomes and construction and evaluation of simulation models. He is a visiting professor in applied times series analysis and data collection, analysis, and presentation topics. He was a member of the NRC Panel on Data and Methods for Measuring the Effects of Changes in Social Welfare Programs. He has a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Minnesota.

Barbara A.Bailar (Consultant) is a statistical consultant in Washington D.C. From 1995 to 2001, she served as Senior Vice-President for Survey Research at the National Opinion Research Center. From 1988 to 1995, she was the Executive Director of the American Statistical Association. Prior to that, she was the Associate Director for Statistical Standards and Methodology at the Bureau of the Census. She is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She is a past President of the American Statistical Association and of the International Association of Survey Sampling, and a former Vice-President of the International Statistical Institute. She has published many articles on censuses and surveys in a variety of publications.

Wesley M.Cohen is professor of economics and management at the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University, as well as a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He has also served as an economist at the Energy Information Agency of the U.S. Department of Energy. His research interests focus on the economics of technological change and industrial organization economics. His published work explores many facets of industrial research and development policy and the economic roots of innovation, and he utilizes the NSF R&D data extensively in his research and writing. He has a Ph.D. in economics from Yale University (1981).

Fred Gault is the director of the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division at Statistics Canada, where he is responsible for the development of statistics on all aspects of research, development, invention, innovation, and diffusion of technologies. He is a fellow of the Institute of Physics and a member of the British Computer Society.



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Measuring Research and Development Expenditures in the U.S. Economy: Interim Report Appendix B Biographical Sketches Lawrence D.Brown (Chair) is the Miers Busch professor in the Department of Statistics at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Previously, he has held faculty positions at Cornell University, Rutgers University, and the University of California, Berkeley. A theoretical statistician, his primary area of research interest is mathematical statistics, in particular, statistical decision theory, complete class theorems, admissibility and minimaxity of estimators and tests, sequential analysis, and the foundations of statistics (properties of conditionality and ancillarity). He was elected to membership in the National Academy of Sciences in 1990. At the National Research Council (NRC), he is currently a member of the Panel to Review the 2000 Census. He has a B.S. from the California Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. from Cornell University. John L.Adams is senior statistician at the RAND Corporation in Santa Monica, California. His recent research areas include measurement of the quality of health care in view of outcomes and construction and evaluation of simulation models. He is a visiting professor in applied times series analysis and data collection, analysis, and presentation topics. He was a member of the NRC Panel on Data and Methods for Measuring the Effects of Changes in Social Welfare Programs. He has a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Minnesota. Barbara A.Bailar (Consultant) is a statistical consultant in Washington D.C. From 1995 to 2001, she served as Senior Vice-President for Survey Research at the National Opinion Research Center. From 1988 to 1995, she was the Executive Director of the American Statistical Association. Prior to that, she was the Associate Director for Statistical Standards and Methodology at the Bureau of the Census. She is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She is a past President of the American Statistical Association and of the International Association of Survey Sampling, and a former Vice-President of the International Statistical Institute. She has published many articles on censuses and surveys in a variety of publications. Wesley M.Cohen is professor of economics and management at the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University, as well as a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He has also served as an economist at the Energy Information Agency of the U.S. Department of Energy. His research interests focus on the economics of technological change and industrial organization economics. His published work explores many facets of industrial research and development policy and the economic roots of innovation, and he utilizes the NSF R&D data extensively in his research and writing. He has a Ph.D. in economics from Yale University (1981). Fred Gault is the director of the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division at Statistics Canada, where he is responsible for the development of statistics on all aspects of research, development, invention, innovation, and diffusion of technologies. He is a fellow of the Institute of Physics and a member of the British Computer Society.

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Measuring Research and Development Expenditures in the U.S. Economy: Interim Report He is chairman of the Committee of National Experts on Science and Technology Indicators at the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and was chairman of the Working Party on Indicators for the Information Society at the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development from its beginning in 1997 until 2002. He has a B.Sc. in economics and a Ph.D. in mathematical physics from the University of London. Marisa A.Gerstein is a research assistant with the Committee on National Statistics. She has worked on numerous projects, including panels on elder mistreatment, nonmarket accounts, research and development statistics, and the 2000 and 2010 decennial censuses. She has a B.A. in sociology from the New College of Florida. Jay Hakes is director of the Jimmy Carter Library and Museum in Atlanta. From 1993 to 2000 he served as an administrator of the Energy Information Administration in the U.S. Department of Energy. In that position, he oversaw the collection, dissemination, and publication of the national energy data series. His areas of interest include statistical survey management, strategic planning, and data dissemination. He has a Ph.D. from Duke University. Brownwyn H.Hall is professor of economics in the Department of Economics at the University of California, Berkeley, as well as a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and president of TSP International, a computer software firm. Her research has focused on financing R&D, R&D in academic settings, and innovation in the economy. She has used NSF R&D data in comparative studies with other sources, such as patent counts. She has extensive service on NRC boards and panels and currently is a member of the Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy; she is also chair of its Planning Committee for Workshop to Review Research and Development Statistics at the National Science Foundation, the work of which is being coordinated with this committee. She has a Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University (1988). Christopher T.Hill is vice provost for research and professor of public policy and technology at George Mason University. He is also president of George Mason Intellectual Properties, Inc. He has served on the professional staff at the National Academy of Engineering, the National Research Council, and the Congressional Research Service. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Science. His publications have been in the field of technological innovation and its impact on the economy, the impact of federal regulation on innovation, and the university perspective on issues of federal R&D procurement. He is responsible for completion of the NSF survey of academic R&D at George Mason University. He has a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Wisconsin. Steven Klepper is professor of economics and social science in the Department of Social and Decision Sciences at Carnegie Mellon University. He is an affiliate of the H.John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management at Carnegie Mellon. His fields of specialization include the evolution of industry and the determinants of technological change, statistical procedures to cope with measurement error, and tax compliance. He is

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Measuring Research and Development Expenditures in the U.S. Economy: Interim Report on the editorial board of Law and Society Review and the Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology. He is a research associate in the Centre for Research on Innovation and Competition, University of Manchester, and has served on the economics panel of the National Science Foundation. His books and articles focus on innovation, economic development, economic evolution, and technological change as a factor in growth and decline of industry. He has a Ph.D. in economics from Cornell University (1975). Tanya M.Lee (Project Assistant) is a staff member at the Committee on National Statistics. Previously at the Institute of Medicine she worked on the Committee on Strategies for Small Number Participant Clinical Research Trials and the Committee on Creating a Vision for Space Medicine During Travel Beyond Earth Orbit. She is pursuing a degree in the field of psychology. Joshua Lerner is the Jacob H.Schiff professor of investment banking at the Harvard Business School with a joint appointment in the finance and entrepreneurial management units, as well as a research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He has extensive experience on issues concerning technological innovation and public policy at the Brookings Institution and on Capitol Hill. His research focuses on the structure of venture capital organizations and issues of patents and other intellectual property protection on the competitive strategies of high-technology industries. He served on the NRC Committee on the Workshop on U.S.-Japan Technology Links in Biotechnology. He has a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University. Baruch Lev is professor of accounting and finance at the Stern School of Business of New York University and director of the Vincent C.Ross Institute for Accounting Research and the Project for Research on Intangibles. He is a member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Accounting Research and the Journal of Accounting and Public Policy. His work focuses on understanding the measurement, valuation, and reporting issues concerning intangible investments, among which research and development are a primary classification. He is also interested in the impact of accounting rules, particularly FASB Statement 2, on the organization and reporting of R&D. He has a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago (1968). Gary McDonald recently retired from the General Motors Research & Development Center, where he was appointed head of the Mathematics Department in 1983; head of the Operations Research Department in 1992; and director of the Enterprise Systems Laboratory in 1998. He is currently a visiting professor at Oakland University and an assistant director at the National Institute of Statistical Sciences. He has chaired several NRC panels and has published numerous articles in diverse areas of applied and mathematical statistics. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has a B.A. from St. Mary’s University of Minnesota and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mathematical statistics from Purdue University; he received a Doctor of Science honoris causa from Purdue University in 2000.

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Measuring Research and Development Expenditures in the U.S. Economy: Interim Report Michael McGeary (Consultant) is a political scientist who directed the staff work for a dozen reports by committees of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and other units of the National Academies. Thomas J.Plewes (Study Director) is a senior program officer for the Committee on National Statistics. In addition to the Committee for the Review of Research and Development Statistics at the National Science Foundation, he is directing studies of international trade traffic statistics and supporting NRC initiatives with the U.S. General Accounting Office on key national indicators of performance. Prior to joining the NRC staff, he was associate commissioner for employment and unemployment statistics of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and was a member of the Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology. He has a B.A. degree from Hope College and an M.A. degree from the George Washington University. Nora Cate Schaeffer is a professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Her research involves cognitive aspects of survey questionnaire design and evaluation of interviewer effects on survey responses. She has served as a visiting fellow at the Census Bureau’s Center for Survey Methods Research. She is a member of the Committee on National Statistics and has served as a member of its Panel to Evaluate Alternative Census Methods. She has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago (1984). Richard Valliant is senior research professor at the University of Michigan and professor in the Joint Program in Statistical Methodology at the University of Maryland. He has over 25 years of experience in sample design and estimation using data from complex surveys. He is currently an associate editor of Survey Methodology and the Journal of Official Statistics and has also been an associate editor of the Journal of the American Statistical Association. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. He has a Ph.D. in biostatistics from Johns Hopkins University (1983).