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serving as accomplices in such crimes should be considered. At present, individuals suspected of committing a crime can be detained for 48 hours, after which they must be formally charged and held or else released. Investigators spend most of this legally permitted period taking care of the various necessary procedural matters, such as preparing the arrest documents, securing a lawyer for the accused, and notifying the prosecutor’s office. It is unrealistic to expect that in the remaining time investigators will be able to gather evidence and decide whether the person in custody is guilty or not guilty. Given the degree of danger that terrorism presents to the public, it would seem expedient to temporarily establish special arrest procedures and detention terms for individuals suspected of planning to commit or participate in terrorist acts.

  • The MVD, FSB, and Central Bank of Russia should be given expanded powers to institute tighter controls on the activities of individuals and legal entities involved in commercial operations, including those in the wholesale trade business, as well as controls on the use of funds by public organizations and their leaders and activists if operational information indicates that they are involved in financing terrorist activities.

  • Internal affairs agencies should be notified when notarized general vehicle licenses are issued.

NOTES

1.  

Terrorism in modern capitalist society. 1980. (2nd ed.). Moscow: Russian Academy of Sciences Institute of Scientific Information in the Social Sciences. p. 8.

2.  

See How to defeat terrorism. 2002. Ekspert 41, November 4.

3.  

On research in this field, see Terrorism—a general threat to security in the twenty-first century: An analytical report. 2001. Moscow: Center for Strategic Development. p. 20.

4.  

See Terror without borders? An answer will come. 2002. Rossiiskaya Gazeta 206, October 30.

5.  

The website www.crdf.org provides information on scientific research in the field of victimology.



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