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Plans call for participation in this project by the leading scientific research, design, engineering, and flight-testing organizations in the Russian aviation sector. These organizations specialize in designing, operating, and testing heavy, light, civilian, and military aircraft; onboard systems for automated and manual flight control; ground-based flight control systems; onboard and ground-based radio communications systems; and others. They have great creative potential and experience and have done much previous scientific and engineering work in aircraft design, testing, and operation; design and operation of onboard equipment and software for use aboard civilian and military aircraft; systematic development of failure-resistant and fail-safe onboard equipment, such as ergatic (man-machine) systems; development and operation of imitation and seminatural model displays; certification of aircraft, equipment, and software; and operation of flight control systems. Based on this concept, a number of technical features could be developed for the stage-by-stage implementation of the project, with the goal of the first stage being the execution of a test flight of a heavy passenger plane in external control mode. The problem must be resolved with the involvement of leading foreign firms and organizations.

CONCLUSION

The appearance of international terrorism on a broad scale represents a challenge to all mankind. Problems involving the improvement of security may be resolved only through the joint efforts of many countries.

NOTES

1.  

Chernenko, V. I., and M. B. Ignatyev. 1996. Multimodal transportation in northwest Russia for sustainable development. Proceedings of the Conference on Sustainable Interregional Transport in Europe, Kouvola, Finland, June 10–12.

2.  

Wilkinson, P., and B. M. Jenkins. 1999. Aviation terrorism and security. London: Frank Cass Publishers. See also Ignatyev, M. B., N. Simatos, and S. Sivasundaram. 1996. Aircraft as adaptive nonlinear systems which must be in the adaptational maximum zone for safety. Proceedings of the First International Conference on Nonlinear Problems in Aviation and Aerospace, Daytona Beach, FL.

3.  

Ignatyev, M. B., L. A. Mironovsky, Yu. M. Smirnov, and G. S. Britov. 1973. Management of computing processes. M. B. Ignatyev, ed. Leningrad: Leningrad State University Publishing House, 296 pp. See also Ignatyev, M. B., A. V. Nikitin, and L. G. Osovetsky. 1988. A bioinformational analogy for building a base interface for software and the INTERFACE-DNA-PC mobile technological environment. In Issues of Programming Technology. Leningrad: Leningrad Institute of Aviation Instrument Building of the USSR Academy of Sciences.

4.  

Ignatyev, M., N. Simatos, and S. Sivasundaram. 1996. Aircraft as adaptive nonlinear systems which must be in the adaptational maximum zone for safety. Proceedings of the First International Conference on Nonlinear Problems in Aviation and Aerospace, Daytona Beach, FL.

5.  

Ignatyev, M., A. Nikitin, and N. Reshetnikova. 1999. Virtual educational, scientific, and industrial environments. In Proceedings of the International Conference on the Internet, Society, and the Individual, St. Petersburg.



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