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B Biographical Information for Speakers and Steering Committee Members Hal Abelson is professor of electrical engineering and computer science at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). He is winner of several teaching awards, including the IEEE's Booth Education Award, cited for his contributions to the teaching of undergraduate computer science. Pro- fessor Abelson's research at the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory fo- cuses on "amorphous computing," an effort to create programming tech- nologies that can harness the power of the new computing substrates emerging from advances in microfabrication and molecular biology. He is also engaged in the interaction of law, policy, and technology as they relate to societal tensions sparked by the growth of the Internet, and he is active in projects at MIT and elsewhere to help bolster our intellectual commons. Professor Abelson is a founding director of the Free Software Foundation and a founding director of Creative Commons. He also serves as consultant to Hewlett-Packard Laboratories. At MIT, Professor Abelson is codirector of the MIT-Microsoft Research Alliance in educational technology and cohead of MIT's Council on Educational Technology. Bruce Alberts, president of the National Academy of Sciences, is known for his work both in biochemistry and molecular biology, in particular for his extensive study of the protein complexes that allow chromosomes to be replicated. Dr. Alberts graduated from Harvard College and earned a doc- torate from Harvard University in 1965. He joined the faculty of Princeton University in 1966 and after 10 years moved to the Department of Bio- 80

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APPENDIX B 81 chemistry and Biophysics at the University of California, San Francisco, where he became chair. He is one of the original authors of The Molecular Biology of the Cell, through four editions the leading advanced textbook in this important field. His most recent text, Essential Cell Biology (1998), is intended to present this subject matter to a wider audience. Dr. Alberts has long been committed to the improvement of science education, dedicating much of his time to educational projects such as City Science, a program that seeks to improve science teaching in San Francisco elementary schools. Kent R. Anderson is the publishing director for the New England Journal of Medicine. Prior to joining the journal, he was director of medical jour- nals at the American Academy of Pediatrics. He has been in health care publishing for more than 15 years and has worked as a writer, editor, de- signer, production manager, copy editor, managing editor, and publisher. He has also worked in continuing medical education, launched a half-dozen successful new titles, and contributed to numerous online publishing ini- tiatives. Daniel E. Atkins* is a professor in the School of Information and in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Michigan (UM), Ann Arbor. He began his research career in the area of computer architecture and did pioneering work in high-speed computer arithmetic and parallel computer architecture. He has served as dean of the College of Engineering and more recently as the founding dean of the School of Information at UM. He is now director of the Alliance for Com- munity Technology (ACT), an international partnership with philanthropy for research and development in the use of information and communica- tion technology (ICT) to further the mission of educational and other non- profit organizations. Dr. Atkins does research and teaching in the area of distributed knowledge systems. He has directed several large experimental digital library projects as well as projects to explore the application of "collaboratories" to scientific research. He has recently served as chair of the National Science Foundation Advisory Panel on Cyberinfrastructure. The panel issued a report in February 2003 recommending a major Advanced Cyberinfrastructure Initiative intended to revolutionize science and engi- neering research and education. He also serves regularly on panels of the * Indicates member of the Symposium Steering Committee.

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82 ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING National Academies exploring issues such as scholarship in the digital age, the future of scholarly communication, and the impact of information tech- nology on the future of higher education. He is coauthor of a recent book entitled Higher Education in the Digital Age: Technology Issues and Strategies for American Colleges and Universities. He serves as a consultant to industry, foundations, educational institutions, and government. Malcolm R. Beasley is professor of applied physics in the Geballe Labora- tory for Advanced Materials at Stanford University. He received his B.Eng. and his Ph.D. in physics from Cornell University. He then went to Harvard University as a research fellow and subsequently became a member of the faculty. In 1974 he joined the faculty of Stanford University where he became a full professor of applied physics in 1979. He served as the chairman of the Department of Applied Physics at Stanford from 1985-1989. In 1990 he was named the Theodore and Sydney Rosenberg Professor of Applied Physics. From 1992 to 1998 he served as director of the Center for Materials Re- search. And from 1998 to 2001 he served as dean of the School of Humani- ties and Sciences. Professor Beasley is a member of Tau Beta Pi, the IEEE, the National Academy of Sciences, and the American Academy of Arts and Sci- ences, and a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Asso- ciation for the Advancement of Science. He is the recipient of the Deans' Award for Superior Teaching at Stanford University. He has served as a con- sultant to the National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and various industrial laboratories. He has also served on various panels of the National Research Council of the National Academies. He was an elected member of the Board of Trustees of Associated Universities, Inc., for the period 2003-2005. Professor Beasleys' research interests are in materials physics with an emphasis on basic and applied superconductivity, in particular high-temperature superconducting materials and applications, and the development and application of advanced thin-film deposition techniques for complex materials. Floyd Bloom* is chairman of the Department of Neuropharmacology at the Scripps Research Institute. He previously served as director of Behavioral Neurobiology at the Salk Institute and as chief of the Laboratory of Neuro- pharmacology of the National Institute of Mental Health. Dr. Bloom is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine (IOM). He has received many awards, including the Pasarow Award in neuro- psychiatry and the Hermann von Helmholtz Award, as well as a number of

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APPENDIX B 83 honorary degrees from major universities. He served as editor-in-chief of Science magazine from 1995-2001 and currently is the president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science Board of Directors. Robert Bovenschulte is director of the Publications Division of the Ameri- can Chemical Society (ACS), which publishes journals, magazines, books, and electronic products. Prior to joining ACS in 1997, he was vice presi- dent for publishing at the Massachusetts Medical Society, owner of the New England Journal of Medicine and other medical publications. His ca- reer spans scholarly, professional, trade, college, and school segments of the industry. He is a frequent speaker and moderator at conferences of publish- ers and librarians. Mr. Bovenschulte has served as chair of the Executive Board of the International Association of Scientific, Technical, and Medical Publishers, chair of the Board of Directors of the Copyright Clearance Cen- ter, chair of the Executive Council of the Association of American Publish- ers' Professional and Scholarly Publishing Division, and member of the Board of Directors of the Council on Library and Information Resources. Monica Bradford is the executive editor of the international journal Sci- ence (published by the American Association for the Advancement of Sci- ence). In this position she oversees the peer-review and selection of manu- scripts; the copyediting and proofreading process; and the design, production, and manufacture of the print product. Over the past few years, Ms. Bradford has been heavily involved in the development of Science Online. In particular, she has helped create a new line of digital products referred to as online knowledge environments. Science's STKE and SAGE KE, the first two products in this line, are directed at research scientists. In addition, Ms. Bradford administers the APBiotech & Science Prize for Young Scientists in Molecular Biology. Prior to joining the staff of Science in 1989, Ms. Bradford worked for the Publications Division of the Ameri- can Chemical Society for 9 years. She holds a bachelor's degree in chemistry from St. Marys' College, Notre Dame, IN, and has done graduate work in management at the University of Maryland. Ms. Bradford was a member of the Board of Directors of the Council of Biology Editors, served as vice- chair of the Scientific Publishing Board of the American Heart Association, and is a member of the Society for Scholarly Publishing. Patrick O. Brown is a professor of biochemistry at Stanford University School of Medicine and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator

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84 ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING at the Stanford Medical School. He received his B.A. in chemistry, and M.D. and Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of Chicago. He did his graduate work with Nick Cozzarelli, studying the basic molecular mechanisms of DNA topoisomerases. Following a residency in pediatrics at Childrens' Memorial Hospital in Chicago, he began studies of the mecha- nism of retroviral integration as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, San Francisco, working with J. Michael Bishop and Harold Varmus. Dr. Brown is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Browns' current research uses DNA microarrays and other "genomic" ap- proaches to explore a wide range of fundamental questions in gene regula- tion, cell biology, physiology, development, and medicine. For the past sev- eral years he has been working to promote open, unrestricted access to scientific and scholarly publications. He is a cofounder and codirector of the Public Library of Science, a nonprofit, open-access scientific publisher. Brian Crawford is vice president and publishing director for Global Life and Medical Sciences within the Scientific, Technical, and Medical (STM) publishing operations of John Wiley & Sons, Inc. He holds overall respon- sibility for coordinating the strategic development and ongoing editorial management of Wiley's international Life and Medical Sciences publish- ing. Experienced in subscription journal, book, and new media publishing, Dr. Crawford has spent nearly two decades within the commercial STM information industry, most recently having served in several management roles at Wiley. Before joining Wiley, he held the position of vice president and editor with Alan R. Liss, Inc. (1988-1989), a privately held book and journal publishing firm that merged to become the wholly owned Wiley- Liss, Inc. subsidiary. Mr. Crawford began his publishing career in 1985 as an acquisitions editor within the Journals Publishing Division of Academic Press, Inc. (at that time a part of Harcourt Brace Jovanovich; now a part of Reed Elsevier). Prior to entering scientific publishing, Dr. Crawford was active in both scientific research and teaching. He had the distinction of being the first biologist to be appointed as a J. Robert Oppenheimer Fellow of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, where he was a member of the scientific research staff within the Genetics Group of the Life Sciences Di- vision from 1981-1984, and helped to launch the Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored human genome project. He received his Ph.D. in the biochemical and biophysical sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, specializing in cellular and molecular aspects of cancer genetics, under sponsorship from the National Cancer Institute. He

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APPENDIX B 85 received his B.S. cum laude in chemistry from the University of Maryland at College Park. Dr. Crawford is a member of the Board of Directors of the American Medical Publishers Association (AMPA; president-elect in 2002- 2003) and the Executive Council of the Professional and Scholarly Publish- ing Division of the Association of American Publishers (PSP/AAP; 2001- present). James J. Duderstadt is president emeritus and University Professor of Sci- ence and Engineering at the University of Michigan. He received his B.Eng. in electrical engineering from Yale University and his Ph.D. in engineering science and physics from the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Duderstadt joined the faculty of the University of Michigan in 1968 as professor of nuclear engineering. He became dean of the College of Engi- neering in 1981 and provost and vice president for academic affairs in 1986. He was appointed president of the university in 1988 and served in this role until July 1996. He currently holds a university-wide faculty appoint- ment. Dr. Duderstadt's teaching and research interests have spanned a wide range of subjects in science, mathematics, and engineering, including work in areas such as nuclear energy, lasers, computers, science policy, and higher education. During his career, Dr. Duderstadt has received numerous awards for his research, teaching, and service activities, including the National Medal of Technology for exemplary service to the nation. Dr. Duderstadt has served on and chaired numerous public and private boards, including the National Science Board and the National Academy of Engineering. He also serves as a director of Unisys and CMS Energy. He currently chairs several major national study commissions in areas including federal research policy, higher education, information technology, and nuclear energy. Joseph J. Esposito is president and CEO of SRI Consulting, the leading publisher of syndicated research for the global chemical industry. Over the course of his career, Mr. Esposito has been associated with various publish- ers in all segments of the industry and was involved from an early time with new media publishing. He has served as an executive at Simon & Schuster and Random House, as president of Merriam-Webster, and CEO of Encyclopaedia Britannica, where he was responsible for the launch of the first Internet service of its kind. Mr. Esposito has also worked extensively in the technology industry as a consultant, with such clients as Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard, and formerly ran the Internet communications company Tribal Voice. His primary area of concentration is the development of strat-

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86 ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING egy and business models for the dissemination of digital content. He has participated in numerous trade shows and has written extensively in trade magazines and journals (see, for example, the essay "The Processed Book" in the March 2003 issue of FirstMonday at www.firstmonday.org). Mr. Esposito is currently researching new economic models for a post-copy- right age. He can be reached at jesposito@sric.sri.com. Jane Ginsburg* is Morton L. Janklow Professor of Literary and Artistic Property Law at Columbia Law School. Ms. Ginsburg received her J.D. from Harvard Law School and her Doctor of Law from the Universite de Paris II. She served as clerk to Judge John J. Gibbons, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit and spent 3 years in private practice before turning to teaching. Her principal areas of interest and expertise are in intellectual property, comparative law, private international law, and legal methods. She has published extensively on copyrights and intellectual property and serves on the editorial boards of several intellectual property journals in the United States and abroad. Michael C. Jensen is the managing director of the Organizational Strategy Practice at the Monitor Company and Jesse Isidor Straus Professor of Busi- ness Administration emeritus of the Harvard Business School. Professor Jensen joined the faculty of the Harvard Business School in 1985. In 1999, he left Harvard to assume his current position at the Monitor Company. He was LaClare Professor of Finance and Business Administration at the William E. Simon Graduate School of Business Administration, University of Rochester, from 1984-1988, professor from 1979-1984, associate pro- fessor from 1971-1979, and assistant professor from 1967-1971. He founded the Managerial Economics Research Center at the University of Rochester in 1977 and served as its director until 1988. Professor Jensen earned his Ph.D. in economics, finance, and accounting, and his M.B.A. in finance from the University of Chicago, and an A.B. degree from Macalester College. He also has been awarded several honorary degrees and served as a Visiting Scholar at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College from July 2001 to June 2002. Professor Jensen is the author of more than 50 scientific papers, in addition to numerous articles, comments, and editori- als published in the popular media on a wide range of economic, finance, and business-related topics. He is author of Foundations of Organizational Strategy (Harvard University Press, 1998) and Theory of the Firm: Gover- nance, Residual Claims, and Organizational Forms (Harvard University Press,

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APPENDIX B 87 2000). He is editor of The Modern Theory of Corporate Finance (with Clifford W. Smith, Jr., McGraw-Hill, 1984) and Studies in the Theory of Capital Markets (Praeger Publishers, 1972). He founded the Journal of Fi- nancial Economics, one of the top two scientific journals in financial eco- nomics, in 1973, serving as managing editor from 1987 to 1997, when he became founding editor. In 1990, he was named "Scholar of the Year" by the Eastern Finance Association and one of the "Year's 25 Most Fascinating Business People" by Fortune magazine. He is the recipient of a 1989 McKinsey Award, the 1984 Joseph Coolidge Shaw S.J. Medal by Boston College, and was awarded (with William Meckling) the Graham and Dodd Plaque and first Leo Melamed Prize for outstanding scholarship by busi- ness school teachers from the University of Chicagos' Graduate School of Business. Dr. Jensen has served as consultant and board member to various corporations, foundations, and governmental agencies, and has given ex- pert testimony before congressional and state committees and state and federal courts. He is past president of the American Finance Association and the Western Economic Association International and a fellow of the American Finance Association, of the American Academy of Arts and Sci- ences, and of the European Corporate Governance Institute. Michael A. Keller is the Ida M. Green University Librarian at Stanford University, director of academic information resources, publisher of HighWire Press, and publisher of the Stanford University Press. Formerly he has been in library leadership positions at Cornell, Berkeley, and Yale, most actively engaged in collection development with broad exposure to the global publication and bookselling trades. In 1995, in response to schol- ars' requests for assistance to their scholarly societies, he established the HighWire Press as an enterprise within the Stanford University Libraries to provide online copublishing services initially to three scholarly journals. As of April 2003, HighWire Press has grown to support 361 high-impact STM journals among more than 120 major scholarly societies. It is also the site creation and host service for the revolutionary, online, third edition of the Oxford English Dictionary. Mr. Keller is now fostering development of addi- tional information tools and services for the scholarly community based on the successful HighWire model, such as the LOCKSS network caching application. He serves on the boards of or as an adviser to several organiza- tions, both for-profit and not-for-profit, including the Long Now Founda- tion, the Digital Library Federation, the Pacific Neighborhood Coalition, and the World Economic Forum. Mr. Keller has consulted for a variety of

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88 ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING institutions and programs, including the City of Ferrara in Italy, Newsweek magazine, Princeton, Cornell, Indiana and other universities, and several information technology companies as well as some of the numerous schol- arly societies whose publishing enterprises HighWire Press supports. For more information see http://highwire.stanford.edu/~mkeller/. David Lipman is the director of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), which is a division of the National Library of Medi- cine within the National Institutes of Health. NCBI was created by Con- gress in 1988 to do basic research in computational biology and to develop computational tools, databases, and information systems for molecular bi- ology. After medical training, Dr. Lipman joined the Mathematical Re- search Branch of the National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases as a research fellow. In his research on computational tools, he developed the most widely used methods for searching biological sequence databases. There are thousands of citations to Dr. Lipmans' methods in papers, which have used them to discover biological functions for unknown sequences and that have thereby advanced the understanding of the mo- lecular basis of human disease. Since 1989, Dr. Lipman has been the direc- tor of the NCBI, a leading research center in computational biology and one of the most heavily used sites in the world for the search and retrieval of biomedical information. Wendy Pradt Lougee is university librarian and McKnight Presidential Professor at the University of Minnesota (appointed June 2002). As univer- sity librarian, she is responsible for a system of 16 libraries on the Twin Cities campus. Prior to her appointment at Minnesota, Ms. Lougee served as associate director of libraries at the University of Michigan, with respon- sibility for digital library development. Michigans' distinction as a premier digital library enterprise developed from a number of significant efforts launched during her tenure, including JSTOR, Making of America, the PEAK (Pricing Electronic Access to Knowledge) Project, OAI harvesting initiative, and a number of publisher collaborations. Ms. Lougee holds a B.A. in English from Lawrence University, an M.S. in library science from the University of Wisconsin, and an M.A. in psychology from the Univer- sity of Minnesota. Richard E. Luce is the research library director at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). He was appointed project leader of LANLs' Library

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APPENDIX B 89 Without Walls in 1994, an internationally recognized pioneering large- scale digital library. Mr. Luce holds numerous advisory and consultative positions supporting digital library development and electronic publishing. In 1999 he cofounded the Open Archives Initiative to develop interoperable standards for author self-archiving systems. Currently, he is the senior ad- viser to the Max Planck Societys' Center for Information Management, an executive board member of the National Information Standards Organiza- tion, and a member of the University of California System-wide Library and Scholarly Information Advisory Committee. He is the course director of the International Spring School on the Digital Library and E-Publishing for Science and Technology in Geneva and a founding member of the Alli- ance for Innovation in Science and Technology Information. Mr. Luce re- ceived a 1996 Los Alamos Distinguished Performance Award for his contri- butions "introducing technological innovations supporting science and technology." The research library was co-recipient of the 1999 Federal Library and Information Center of the Year award and a 1997 and 2000 Quality New Mexico "Roadrunner" recipient for organizational perfor- mance excellence based on the Malcolm Baldrige criteria. Clifford Lynch* is the director of the Coalition for Networked Informa- tion (CNI). Prior to joining CNI in 1997, Dr. Lynch spent 18 years at the University of California Office of the President, the last 10 as director of library automation. He holds a Ph.D. in computer science from the Uni- versity of California, Berkeley, and is an adjunct professor at Berkeleys' School of Information Management and Systems. He is a past president of the American Society for Information Science and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the National Information Standards Organization. Dr. Lynch currently serves on the Internet2 Ap- plications Council and is a member of the NRC Committee to Study Digi- tal Archiving and the National Archives and Records Administration. He was a member of the NRC committee that published The Digital Dilemma: Intellectual Property in the Information Infrastructure and served on the NRC committee on Broadband Last-Mile Technology. Jeffrey MacKie-Mason* is Arthur W. Burks Professor of Information and Computer Science and a professor of economics and public policy at the University of Michigan. He is also the founding director of the Program for Research on the Information Economy at the university and the director of doctoral studies at the School of Information at Michigan. His work is

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90 ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING primarily in information economics, especially the Internet and advanced telecommunications technologies, and the economics of digital informa- tion content. Professor MacKie-Mason received his A.B. in environmental policy from Dartmouth, his Master of Public Policy from University of Michigan, and his Ph.D. in economics from MIT. James J. O'Donnell is professor of classics and provost at Georgetown University. He served in 2003 as president of the American Philological Association and has been elected a fellow of the Medieval Academy of America. In 1990, he cofounded Bryn Mawr Classical Review, the second- oldest humanities e-journal. His 1998 book, Avatars of the Word: From Pa- pyrus to Cyberspace (Harvard University Press), explores the impact of tech- nologies of writing on the shaping of culture from antiquity to the present. Ann Okerson* is associate university librarian for collections and technical services at Yale University. She is responsible for making digital collections available to the many and varied users at Yale and has become an expert in licensing digital information for academic use and on building consortia of libraries to achieve the most effective service at the best price for academic users. Prior to joining Yale, she served as director of the Office of Scientific and Academic Publishing at the Association of Research Libraries. Ms. Okerson was named Serials Librarian of the Year in 1993 by the American Library Association (ALA) and is also the 1999 recipient of their LITA/ High Tech award. She was a member of the NRC Committee on Informa- tion Technology Strategy for the Library of Congress. Paul Resnick is an associate professor at the University of Michigan School of Information. He previously worked as a researcher at AT&T Labs and AT&T Bell Labs, and as an assistant professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Sloan School of Management. He received his master's and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering and computer science from MIT, and a bachelor's degree in mathematics from the University of Michigan. Professor Resnicks' research focuses on sociotechnical capital, productive social relations that are enabled by the ongoing use of information and communication technology. He was a pioneer in the field of recommender systems (sometimes called collaborative filtering or social filtering). Recommender systems guide people to interesting materials based on rec- ommendations from other people. His current research focuses on reputa-

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APPENDIX B 91 tion systems, which apply the ideas of recommender systems to evaluating people. Bernard Rous is the deputy director of publications and electronic pub- lishing program director for the Association of Computing Machinery. He received his undergraduate education at Brandeis University, and an M.A. at the New School for Social Research in anthropology. Mr. Rous has worked in publishing at ACM from 1980 to the present. His responsibili- ties have included development and management of a database publishing system for reference publications; development of early CD-ROM and hypertext products; project manager for SGML publishing production sys- tem; development and direction of an electronic publishing program; draft- ing copyright and permissions policy for the networked environment; and establishment of Digital Library, Online Bibliographic Database, and Com- puting Portal with appropriate business models. Edward H. Shortliffe* (chair, Symposium Steering Committee) is a profes- sor and chair of the Department of Medical Informatics and deputy vice president for information technology for the Health Sciences Division of Columbia University. His research interests include medical informatics; issues related to integrated decision-support systems and their effective implementation; clinical medicine; and medical-informatics research and teaching. Prior to his current position, he was at Stanford University. Dr. Shortliffe provides expertise in both medicine and computer science. He received an A.B. from Harvard in applied mathematics, a Ph.D. from Stanford in medical information sciences, and an M.D. from Stanford. Dr. Shortliffe is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM), the IOM Coun- cil, and the NRC Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy. He also served as chair of the NRC Committee on Enhancing the Internet for Biomedical Applications: Technical Requirements and Implementation Strategies. Alexander Szalay is the Alumni Centennial Professor of Astronomy and professor of computer science at the Johns Hopkins University. He is a cosmologist, working on the statistical measures of the spatial distribution of galaxies and galaxy formation. He is the architect for the Science Archive of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Professor Szalay is project director of the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded National Virtual Observatory.

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92 ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING Gordon Tibbitts is president of Blackwell Publishing, USA. Since 1982, he has worked to integrate electronic publishing technology into the tradi- tional publishing business. Early on, he recognized the advantages of auto- mating prepress and manufacturing work, including editorial, production, and typesetting functions, and successfully integrated the entire digital work flow at Aster Publishing Corporation in the mid-1980s. He also was re- sponsible for automating publishing processes, creating SGML/XML/ HTML-encoded content, and delivering products electronically in the early 1990s for American Health Consultants (a Thomson company). In addi- tion to his publishing experience, Mr. Tibbitts worked for several years leading health care software development for two other Thomson informa- tion technology holdings, DKD and The Medstat Group. He developed systems sold to leading hospitals and clinics in the United States, integrat- ing clinical and financial informatics, applying clinical best practice with performance optimization concepts drawn from evidence-based, disease- staging, case management, and JIT fields of learning. Throughout his ca- reer, Mr. Tibbitts has driven organizations toward the leading edge of technology's application in disseminating information. With Blackwell, he plays a major role in the development of all corporate technology initia- tives, including Web-based content development. He has worked in execu- tive positions for Aster Publishing, Advanstar, and The Thomson Corpora- tion. Mr. Tibbitts received a B.S. in computer science and an M.B.A. from the University of Oregon. Mary Waltham* is a publishing consultant. She was most recently presi- dent and publisher for Nature and the Nature family of journals in the United States, and formerly managing director and publisher of The Lancet in the United Kingdom. She founded her own consulting company 4 years ago. Its purpose is to help international scientific, technical, and medical publishers to confront the rapid change that the networked economy poses to their traditional business models, and to develop the new opportunities to build publications that deliver outstanding scientific and economic value. Ms. Waltham has worked at a senior level in science and medical publishing companies across a range of media, which include textbooks, magazines, newsletters, journals, and open learning materials. She served on the NRC Committee on Community Standards for Sharing Publication-Related Data and Materials.

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APPENDIX B 93 Ann Wolpert became director of libraries for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in January 1996. She oversees this distributed library system, which consists of five major collections, five smaller branch libraries in specialized subject areas, a fee-for-services group, and the Institute Archives. As of January 1999, her position expanded to include reporting responsi- bility for the MIT Press, which publishes approximately 200 new books and more than 40 journals per year in fields related to science and technol- ogy. Recently, Ms. Wolpert also assumed oversight of Technology Review, MIT's magazine of innovation. Ms. Wolperts' institute responsibilities in- clude membership on the Committee on Copyright and Patents, the Coun- cil on Educational Technology, the Campus Plan Steering Committee, the Deans' Committee, and the Presidents' Academic Council. She chairs the Management Board of the MIT Press, serves on the OpenCourseWare In- terim Management Board, and is cochair of the Internal Review Committee for Financial Systems Services and Information Systems. Prior to joining MIT, Ms. Wolpert was executive director of library and information services at the Harvard Business School. Her experience also includes management of the Information Center of Arthur D. Little, Inc., where she additionally engaged in consulting assignments. More recent consulting assignments have taken her to Adelphi University in New York, to the campuses of INCAE in Costa Rica and Nicaragua, and to the Malaysia University of Science and Technol- ogy, Selangor, Malaysia. Ms. Wolpert is active in the professional library com- munity. She currently serves on the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Board of Directors and is a member of ARLs' Scholarly Communication Committee and of its Internet2 Working Group. She also serves on the Board of Directors of the Boston Library Consortium. In addition, she is a member of the editorial boards of Library & Information Science Research and The Journal of Library Administration. A frequent speaker and writer, she has re- cently contributed papers on such topics as library service to remote library users, intellectual property management in the electronic environment, and the future of research libraries in the digital age. Ms. Wolpert serves on the Board of Trustees of Simmons College. In 1998 she was elected to the Na- tional Network for Women Leaders in Higher Education of the American Council on Education. She received a B.A. from Boston University and an M.L.S. from Simmons College.