Appendixes



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River Basins and Coastal Systems Planning within the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Appendixes

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River Basins and Coastal Systems Planning within the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Appendix A Panel and Staff Biographies PANEL MEMBERS Peter R. Wilcock, Chair, is a professor in the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering at The Johns Hopkins University. He received his B.S. in physical geography from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; his M.S. in geomorphology from McGill University; and his Ph.D. in geology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research focuses on problems of erosion and sedimentation and their application to river management. In 1997-1998, Dr. Wilcock served on the National Research Council (NRC) committee evaluating adaptive management of Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River ecosystem. Gail M. Ashley is a professor of geological sciences at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey. She is also director of the Quaternary Studies Graduate Program. Her research interests include a comparison of terrestrial records of paleoclimate during the Quaternary in polar, temperate, and tropical regions and reconstruction of the paleoenvironment of early hominids. She has served as president of the Geological Society of America, vice-president of the International Association of Sedimentologists and editor-in-chief of the Journal of Sedimentary Research, president of the Society for Sedimentary Geology, and a past member of the Board of Earth Sciences and Resources.

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River Basins and Coastal Systems Planning within the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Denise L. Breitburg is a senior scientist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center and an adjunct professor at the University of Maryland. Formerly, she worked as a curator at the Academy of Natural Sciences, Estuarine Research Center. Her research integrates aspects of ecology, animal behavior, and the effects of human population on marine and estuarine systems. She received a B.S. in biology from Arizona State University, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in biology from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Virginia R. Burkett is chief of the Forest Ecology Branch of the National Wetlands Research Center at Lafayette, Louisiana. Dr. Burkett’s current research involves climate change impacts in coastal regions and bottomland hardwood regeneration in frequently flooded sites of the Mississippi River alluvial valley. Before joining the U.S. Geological Survey, she was director of the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries. She has also served as assistant director of the Louisiana Geological Survey and as director of the Louisiana Coastal Zone Management Program. She received her B.S. and M.S. from Northwestern State University of Louisiana and her doctorate degree in forestry from Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches, Texas. Joseph L. Cordes is professor of economics at George Washington University. He directs the Ph.D. program in public policy. Dr. Cordes served as associate dean for faculty affairs and programs in the Columbian School of Arts and Sciences and as chair of the Department of Economics from 1991 to 1997. He has also held appointments as an economic policy fellow at the Brookings Institute, a financial economist at the U.S. Department of the Treasury, and deputy assistant director for tax analysis at the Congressional Budget Office. His research focuses on the economic behavior of nonprofit organizations and on evaluating public programs intended to reduce economic risks from flood and storm damage. He received an M.S. and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Robert G. Dean has been graduate research professor of coastal and ocean engineering at the University of Florida since 1982. Previously, he held faculty positions at the University of Delaware, the University of Washington, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He also has served as a consultant on coastal and ocean engineering to private industry and government. Dr. Dean is an expert in wave mechanics and coastal engineering problems, and he has published many papers on wave

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River Basins and Coastal Systems Planning within the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers theory, beach erosion problems, tidal inlets, and coastal structures. He is a past recipient of the John G. Moffatt-Frank E. Nichol Harbor and Coastal Engineering Award given by the American Society of Civil Engineers. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and chair of the NRC Committee on the Restoration and Protection of Coastal Louisiana. Dr. Dean is also a former member of the National Academies’ Marine Board and a former chair of the NRC Committee on Engineering Implications of Sea Level Rise. Dr. Dean has a B.S. from the University of California, Berkeley; an M.S. from the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas; and a Sc.D. in civil engineering from MIT. John A. Dracup is a professor in the department of civil and environmental engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. Previously, he served on the faculty of the University of California, Los Angeles. His research interests include hydroclimatology; analysis of large-scale water resource systems and hydrologic and environmental systems; engineering economics of water resources systems; and surface water hydrology. He served as lieutenant with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers from 1957 to 1958. He received a B.S. from the University of Washington, an M.S. from MIT, and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. William J. Mitsch is a professor of natural resources and environmental science at Ohio State University and director of the Olentangy River Wetland Research Park. His research interests include wetland ecology and management; wetland restoration and creation; wetland biogeochemistry; ecological economics of wetlands and other ecosystems; ecological engineering; ecosystem ecology and modeling; wetlands and global climate change; wetland vegetation dynamics; and primary productivity in aquatic systems. Dr. Mitsch is editor-in-chief of Ecological Engineering. He served as a member of the NRC’s committees on characterization of wetlands and mitigating wetland losses. He received his Ph.D. in environmental engineering sciences (systems ecology) from the University of Florida. Robert E. Randall is professor of ocean and civil engineering at Texas A&M University, where he directs the university’s Center for Dredging Studies. He has served at head of the Ocean Engineering Program and Ocean and Hydraulic Engineering Group in the Civil Engineering Department. He was an ocean engineer at Harbor Branch Foundation, Inc., from 1973 to 1975 and a mechanical engineer at the Naval Underwater System Center from 1972 to 1973. Dr. Randall is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, Society of Naval Architects and

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River Basins and Coastal Systems Planning within the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Marine Engineers, Western Dredging Association, American Society of Engineering Education, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and a fellow in the Marine Technology Society. He received his B.M.E. in mechanical engineering from Ohio State University and his M.S. and Ph.D. in ocean engineering from the University of Rhode Island. A. Dan Tarlock holds an A.B. and LL.B. from Stanford University and is currently distinguished professor of law at the Chicago-Kent College of Law. He previously practiced law in San Francisco and Denver, and taught at the University of Chicago, University of Hawaii, Indiana University, University of Kansas, University of Michigan, University of Texas, and University of Utah. Mr. Tarlock has written and consulted widely in the fields of water law, environmental protection, and natural resources management. Mr. Tarlock served as a member of the Water Science and Technology Board and chaired the Committee on Western Water Management Change, which published the report Water Transfers in the West. In 1997 to 1998, he served as the principal writer for the Western Policy Advisory Review Commission’s report Water in the West. Mr. Tarlock is currently serving as one of the three United States legal advisers to the Secretariat of the Commission on Environmental Cooperation, established by the North American Free Trade Agreement Environmental Side Agreement. NRC STAFF MEMBERS John Dandelski (study director) received his M.A. in marine affairs and policy from the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS), University of Miami, in 2001, where his research focused on evaluating fisheries’ impacts to the benthic communities of Biscayne Bay. While at RSMAS he served as the assistant diving safety officer and also worked for the International Oceanographic Foundation. Mr. Dandelski has been a research associate with the Ocean Studies Board since 2001. As a graduate research intern at the Congressional Research Service he wrote two reports for Congress on fisheries and ocean health issues. He was also the project manager for the NRC Abrupt Climate Change: Inevitable Surprises and has worked on a number of other NRC reports, including Environmental Information for Naval Warfare (2003), and Oil in the Sea III: Inputs, Fates, and Effects (2003). Mr. Dandelski also holds an M.S. in industrial/organizational psychology and worked in the field of experiential environmental education for several years.

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River Basins and Coastal Systems Planning within the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Dan Walker (senior program officer) obtained his Ph.D. in geology from the University of Tennessee in 1990. A senior program officer at the Ocean Studies Board, Dr. Walker also holds a joint appointment as a guest investigator at the Marine Policy Center of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Since joining the Ocean Studies Board in 1995, he has directed a number of studies including Environmental Information for Naval Warfare (2003); Oil in the Sea III: Inputs, Fates and Effects (2003); Clean Coastal Waters: Understanding and Reducing the Effects of Nutrient Pollution (2000); Science for Decisionmaking: Coastal and Marine Geology at the U.S. Geological Survey (1999); Global Ocean Sciences: Toward an Integrated Approach (1998); and The Global Ocean Observing System: Users, Benefits, and Priorities (1997). A member of the American Geophysical Union, the Geological Society of America, and the Oceanography Society, Dr. Walker was recently named editor of the Marine Technology Society Journal. A former member of both the Kentucky and the North Carolina State geologic surveys, Dr. Walker’s interests focus on the value of environmental information for policy making at local, state, and national levels. Nancy A. Caputo (senior project assistant) received a master’s of public policy from the University of Southern California and a bachelor’s degree in political science-international relations from the University of California, Santa Barbara. During her tenure with the Ocean Studies Board, she has assisted with the completion of four reports: A Review of the Florida Keys Carrying Capacity Study (2002); Emulsified Fuels—Risks and Response (2002); Decline of the Steller Sea Lion in Alaskan Waters—Untangling Food Webs and Fishing Nets (2003); and Enabling Ocean Research in the 21st Century: Implementation of a Network of Ocean Observatories (2003). Ms. Caputo has previous professional experience in researching fisheries management in the northeastern and northwestern United States, socioeconomic assistance programs for fishing communities, and habitat restoration programs. Her interests include marine policy and science, oceanographic education, coastal management, and habitat restoration.

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River Basins and Coastal Systems Planning within the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers