Appendix B
Committee and Staff Biographies

Bernard Guyer, M.D., M.P.H. (Chair), is Zanvyl Kreiger Professor of Children’s Health and former chair of the Department of Population and Family Health Science in the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine, and served as chair of the Committee on Immunization Finance Policies and Practices. Dr. Guyer’s research interests are in maternal and child health, including work on prevention of childhood injuries, childhood immunization and primary care systems, strategies for preventing infant mortality, and maternal and child health program organization, finance, and implementation. His research examines the span of children’s health conditions, including etiological factors, prevention strategies, systems of health care, and the social and policy contexts for child health and well-being.

Jeffrey Alexander, Ph.D., is the Richard Carl Jelinek Professor of Health Management and Policy in the School of Public Health, University of Michigan. He also holds positions as professor of organizational behavior and human resources management, School of Business; faculty associate, Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research; and research scientist, Veterans Affairs Health Services Research and Development Center. He received his Ph.D. in Sociology (organization theory) from Stanford University in 1980, after earning a Master’s degree in Health Services Administration from Stanford in 1976. His teaching and research interests focus on organizational change in the health care sector, multi-



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 332
Forging a Poison Prevention and Control System Appendix B Committee and Staff Biographies Bernard Guyer, M.D., M.P.H. (Chair), is Zanvyl Kreiger Professor of Children’s Health and former chair of the Department of Population and Family Health Science in the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine, and served as chair of the Committee on Immunization Finance Policies and Practices. Dr. Guyer’s research interests are in maternal and child health, including work on prevention of childhood injuries, childhood immunization and primary care systems, strategies for preventing infant mortality, and maternal and child health program organization, finance, and implementation. His research examines the span of children’s health conditions, including etiological factors, prevention strategies, systems of health care, and the social and policy contexts for child health and well-being. Jeffrey Alexander, Ph.D., is the Richard Carl Jelinek Professor of Health Management and Policy in the School of Public Health, University of Michigan. He also holds positions as professor of organizational behavior and human resources management, School of Business; faculty associate, Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research; and research scientist, Veterans Affairs Health Services Research and Development Center. He received his Ph.D. in Sociology (organization theory) from Stanford University in 1980, after earning a Master’s degree in Health Services Administration from Stanford in 1976. His teaching and research interests focus on organizational change in the health care sector, multi-

OCR for page 332
Forging a Poison Prevention and Control System institutional systems, governance and physician participation in institutional management, and policy making. His research has focused extensively on interorganizational arrangements in the health care sector and includes studies of integrated health care systems, public–private partnerships, physician–organization arrangements, and multihospital systems. His recent publications have appeared in Health Services Research, The Milbank Quarterly, Medical Care Research and Review, Administrative Science Quarterly, and Journal of Health and Social Behavior. Paul D. Blanc, M.D., M.S.P.H., is a professor of medicine and Endowed Chair in Occupational and Environmental Medicine in the Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine at the University of California–San Francisco. He is a member of the Toxic Air Contaminant Scientific Review Panel of the California Air Resources Board and associate medical director of the California Poison Control System, San Francisco Division. Dr. Blanc is board certified in occupational medicine and internal medicine and holds a certificate of added qualifications in medical toxicology. His current research interests are in the epidemiology of occupational lung disease and occupational toxicology, especially in terms of pulmonary responses. He has authored several reports based on poison control surveillance. Dennis Emerson, R.N., B.S., is a nurse in the emergency department of Saint Luke’s Regional Medical Center in Boise, ID. He has served as an emergency department nurse for 23 years and was a nurse at the Idaho Poison Control Center for 8 years. Mr. Emerson is an active member of the Emergency Nurses Association and former member of the Pediatric Resource Group. He is an instructor for three courses: Emergency Nursing Pediatric Course, Trauma Nurse Core Course, and Advanced Cardiac Life Support. He is a Certified Poison Information Specialist and an instructor in hospital operations training for hazardous material exposure. Jerris R. Hedges, M.D., is professor and chair, Department of Emergency Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland. He is internationally recognized for his contributions to the development of emergency medicine as a scientific discipline. His book, Clinical Procedures in Emergency Medicine, helped define the discipline and set the standard for evidence-based practice texts addressing clinical procedures. Dr. Hedges’ research broadly encompasses the field, and his work on transcutaneous cardiac pacing in the early 1980s helped introduce that modality into daily emergency practice. His evaluations of Oregon trauma care have helped clarify the impact of systems of trauma care on clinical outcomes.

OCR for page 332
Forging a Poison Prevention and Control System Dr. Hedges is the current president of the Association of Academic Chairs of Emergency Medicine. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Mark Scott Kamlet, Ph.D., is provost at Carnegie Mellon University and H. John Heinz III Professor of Economics and Public Policy. His primary research interests include health policy, federal budget policy, and statistical methodology (econometrics and decision analysis). Professor Kamlet served on the expert panel that published the book Cost-Effectiveness in Health and Medicine: A Report of the Expert Panel on Cost-Effectiveness in Health and Medicine. This panel was charged with developing national guidelines for conducting cost-effectiveness analysis for health policy. He has also served on National Institutes of Health panels to propose national guidelines for population-based genetic screening for cystic fibrosis and for newborn screening for metabolic disorders. Angela Mickalide, Ph.D., C.H.E.S., is program director of the National SAFE KIDS Campaign, Washington, DC, a nonprofit organization dedicated to preventing unintentional injuries among children ages 14 and under. In this capacity, she ensures the scientific rigor of the Campaign’s injury prevention programs addressing traffic injuries, fire and burns, drowning, falls, airway obstruction, and poisoning for more than 600 SAFE KIDS coalitions and chapters in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Dr. Mickalide is an adjunct associate professor of prevention and community health at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services. Dr. Mickalide has published 50 articles, book chapters, and research reports and has delivered more than 200 presentations concerning injury prevention, health education, and clinical preventive services. She serves on the editorial boards of Injury Prevention, American Journal of Preventive Medicine, and Health Promotion Practice and served previously on the editorial boards of Patient Education and Counseling and Health Education and Behavior. Paul Pentel, M.D., is a professor in the Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology at the University of Minnesota Medical School and chief of the Division of Clinical Pharmacology at Hennepin County Medical Center. He serves as president of the Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation, and is a past president of the American College of Medical Toxicology. Dr. Pentel’s research interests include the mechanisms and treatment of antidepressant and stimulant drug toxicity, drug dependence, and the pharmacokinetic determinants of drug dependence. His current focus is nicotine and tobacco pharmacology, and the development of treatment medications for tobacco dependence. He is certified in internal medicine and medical toxicology.

OCR for page 332
Forging a Poison Prevention and Control System Barry H. Rumack, M.D., served as director of the Rocky Mountain Poison and Drug Center in Denver from 1974 through 1991 and is now director emeritus. He has been professor of pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and is now Clinical Professor. He founded Poisindex®, a toxicology database, and developed other databases as part of Micromedex, which is now part of the Thomson Corporation. He served as president of the American Association of Poison Control Centers from 1982 to 1984 and was chairman of the American Board of Medical Toxicology from 1988 to 1990. He has been a member of the Colorado State Board of Health and has served on advisory committees to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, the Food and Drug Administration, the Governor of Colorado for the Rocky Mountain Arsenal and Lowry Landfill, and others. He also serves as an arbitrator for the American Arbitration Association. His specialty is pediatrics and general medical toxicology, with specific interests in acetaminophen and mushrooms. David P. Schor, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.A.P., is chief of the Division of Family and Community Health Services in the Ohio Department of Health. Prior to taking this position, he held positions as health promotion and education director, medical advisor, and maternal and child health director in the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, in which he implemented program expansions in tobacco control, cardiovascular disease and injury prevention, and asthma programs; developed methods and reports for child death review and asthma surveillance; and staffed or led consensus and task force panels for diabetes treatment, human genetics technologies, and state infant mortality. Dr. Schor is certified by the University of Oklahoma School of Public Health as an instructor in epidemiology and biostatistics and has served as a consultant to the federal Maternal and Child Health Bureau in the area of grant reviews and site visits. Daniel Adrian Spyker, M.D., Ph.D., is the director of clinical pharmacology at Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA. He was an academic internist at the University of Virginia until he joined the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1990. At the FDA, Dr. Spyker served as medical officer in the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research Pilot Drug Evaluation staff from 1990 to 1993, after which he joined the Center for Diseases and Radiological Health as deputy director in the Division of Cardiovascular, Respiratory, and Neurological Devices. He is an active and enthusiastic participant in the design and reporting of clinical trials and in drug and device labeling, in the design of information systems relating to toxicology and pharmacokinetics, and in the application of biostatistical models and statistical analysis. He has a Ph.D. in electrical engineering;

OCR for page 332
Forging a Poison Prevention and Control System his medical specialties are internal medicine, medical toxicology, and clinical pharmacology. Andy Stergachis, Ph.D., R.Ph., is professor of epidemiology and affiliate professor of pharmacy, Northwest Center for Public Health Practice, School of Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, where his focus is on public health emergency preparedness and response. Previously, he was professor and chair of the Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Washington. He is a former member of the Board of the Washington Poison Center. His research and practice have been at the intersection of public health and proper medication use and he has done extensive work in postmarketing drug evaluations. Dr. Stergachis serves as a member of the National Committee for Quality Assurance’s Asthma Measurement Advisory Panel and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Health Systems Research Study Section. He served as a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Interactions of Drugs, Biologics, and Chemicals in U.S. Military Forces. He is the former chief pharmacist for drugstore.com. He was awarded the 2002 Pinnacle Award by the American Pharmaceutical Association Foundation for his career contributions toward improving quality of care through the medication use process. David J. Tollerud, M.D., M.P.H., is professor and chair of the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences at the School of Public Health and Information Sciences, University of Louisville, Kentucky. Dr. Tollerud has medical training in internal medicine, pulmonary and critical care medicine, and occupational medicine, and research expertise in environmental and occupational health, epidemiology, immunology, and injury prevention. He currently serves on the Institute of Medicine’s Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention and chairs the National Research Council’s Committee on the Superfund Site Assessment and Remediation in the Coeur d’Alene River Basin. He has served on numerous Institute of Medicine committees and chaired a series of committees that evaluated the health effects of Agent Orange in Vietnam veterans. Deborah Klein Walker, Ed.D., recently joined Abt Associates, Inc., as a principal associate in the Health Services, Research and Evaluation practice area. For the prior 15 years, Dr. Walker was at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, where she most recently was the associate commissioner for programs and prevention and was responsible for programs in maternal and child health, health promotion, and disease prevention; primary care and community health programs; minority health;

OCR for page 332
Forging a Poison Prevention and Control System and data integration and information systems. She is currently an adjunct professor at the Boston University School of Public Health and an adjunct lecturer at the Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Walker is a past president of the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs and a former board member of the American Public Health Association. Dr. Walker’s research and policy interests include child and family policy, program implementation and evaluation, public health practice, disability policy, community health systems, health outcomes, and data systems. Liaison Mary Jane England, M.D., is president of Regis College. She trained in psychiatry at Boston’s University Hospital and at San Francisco’s Mt. Zion Hospital, completing her child and adolescent residency at Boston University and Boston City Child Guidance Clinic. She has served as director of child psychiatry at Brighton’s St. Elizabeth Hospital of Boston, then as director of clinical psychiatry at the Brighton-Allston Mental Health Clinic, and from 1974 to 1976 as director of planning and manpower for Children’s Services in the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health. In 1976 she assumed the position of associate commissioner, Massachusetts Department of Mental Health, and was a consultant to and chairperson of the Human Resources Policy Committee at the National Institute of Mental Health. As commissioner of the Massachusetts Department of Social Services, she designed and implemented a new state agency replacing the Department of Public Welfare to improve the quality of services and ensure citizen involvement as she improved social services and child welfare policy. In 1983 she was lured to Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government as associate dean and director of the Lucious N. Littauer Master in Public Administration Program. From 1995 to 1996, Dr. England served as the president of the American Psychiatric Association. Staff Anne S. Mavor (Program Director) is the study director for the Committee on Poison Prevention and Control. Her previous National Research Council and Institute of Medicine work has included studies on health care messages for diverse populations, workplace activities and their relationship to musculoskeletal disorders, occupational analysis and the enhancement of human performance, the changing nature of work, and the implications of youth values, aptitudes, and opportunities for military recruiting and retention. She is the staff director for the Committee on

OCR for page 332
Forging a Poison Prevention and Control System Human Factors and has extensive experience in cognitive psychology and information system design. She has an M.S. in experimental psychology from Purdue University. Susan McCutchen (Research Associate) has been on staff at The National Academies for over 20 years and worked in several Academy divisions and with many different boards, committees, and panels in those units. The studies in which she has participated have covered a broad range of subjects and focused on a variety of issues related to international affairs, technology transfer, aeronautics, natural disasters, education, needle exchange, the polygraph, and human factors. She has assisted in the production of a large number of Academy publications. A French major, with minors in English, Italian, and Spanish, she has a B.A. degree from Ohio’s Miami University, and an M.A. degree from Kent State University.