Appendix C
Biographical Information of Panel Members and Staff

Donald F. Boesch is a professor of marine science and President of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES). Dr. Boesch is a biological oceanographer who has studied coastal and continental shelf environments along the Atlantic Coast and in the Gulf of Mexico, eastern Australia, and the East China Sea. He has published two books and more than 60 papers on marine benthos, estuaries, wetlands, continental shelves, oil pollution, nutrient over-enrichment, environmental assessment and monitoring and science policy. In 1980 he returned to his native state as the first Executive Director of the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium (LUMCON), where he was also a professor of marine science at Louisiana State University. He was a Fulbright Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Queensland and subsequently served on the faculty of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science. Dr. Boesch received his B.S. degree from Tulane University and Ph.D. degree from the College of William Mary.

Henry J. Bokuniewicz is a professor at the Marine Sciences Research Center at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. His research interests include nearshore transport processes, coastal groundwater hydrology, coastal sedimentation, and marine geophysics. He is particularly interested in the behavior of coastal sedimentary systems and coastal groundwater hydrology and its relations to coastal zone management problems. He received his B.A. from the University of Illinois, and his M. Phil. and Ph.D. degrees from Yale University.

Richard de Neufville is a professor of engineering systems and of civil and environmental engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. From 1976-2000 he was the founding chair of the MIT Technology and Policy Program. Earlier, he was a White House Fellow for President Johnson. His research is in dynamic strategic planning and technology policy, engineering systems analysis and real options. He has written textbooks in these fields. Dr. de Neufville received his S.B.,



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Adaptive Management for Water Resources Project Planning Appendix C Biographical Information of Panel Members and Staff Donald F. Boesch is a professor of marine science and President of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES). Dr. Boesch is a biological oceanographer who has studied coastal and continental shelf environments along the Atlantic Coast and in the Gulf of Mexico, eastern Australia, and the East China Sea. He has published two books and more than 60 papers on marine benthos, estuaries, wetlands, continental shelves, oil pollution, nutrient over-enrichment, environmental assessment and monitoring and science policy. In 1980 he returned to his native state as the first Executive Director of the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium (LUMCON), where he was also a professor of marine science at Louisiana State University. He was a Fulbright Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Queensland and subsequently served on the faculty of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science. Dr. Boesch received his B.S. degree from Tulane University and Ph.D. degree from the College of William Mary. Henry J. Bokuniewicz is a professor at the Marine Sciences Research Center at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. His research interests include nearshore transport processes, coastal groundwater hydrology, coastal sedimentation, and marine geophysics. He is particularly interested in the behavior of coastal sedimentary systems and coastal groundwater hydrology and its relations to coastal zone management problems. He received his B.A. from the University of Illinois, and his M. Phil. and Ph.D. degrees from Yale University. Richard de Neufville is a professor of engineering systems and of civil and environmental engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. From 1976-2000 he was the founding chair of the MIT Technology and Policy Program. Earlier, he was a White House Fellow for President Johnson. His research is in dynamic strategic planning and technology policy, engineering systems analysis and real options. He has written textbooks in these fields. Dr. de Neufville received his S.B.,

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Adaptive Management for Water Resources Project Planning S.M. and Ph.D. degrees from MIT, and his Dr. hc. Degree from the Delft University of Technology. G. Edward Dickey is a consultant to public and private organizations interested in water policy and infrastructure development and management. He also is adjunct professor of economics at Loyola College in Maryland. Dr. Dickey retired from federal service in 1998 after a career in water resources planning and project development. In his last position as Chief of the Planning Division of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, he directed the Corps' nationwide water resources planning programs and its small project programs. In his prior positions as Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army and Acting Assistant Secretary of the Army (Civil Works), he provided leadership and policy direction for all army civil works activities including the Section 404 regulatory program. He received his B.A. degree in political economy from the Johns Hopkins University and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Northwestern University. Holly D. Doremus is a professor of law at the University of California, Davis. Before joining UC-Davis, she taught law at University of Oregon School of Law and Oregon State University, Corvallis. Previous to teaching, she was an associate at Eickelberg & Fewel at Corvallis, Oregon. Before entering law school, Dr. Doremus conducted basic research on metabolic pathways of plants but was always interested in how scientific data are integrated into a legal structure. She received her B.S. degree in biology from Trinity College, her Ph.D. degree from Cornell University, and her J.D. degree from the University of California, Berkeley. Carl H. Hershner is an associate professor of marine science at the College of William and Mary. He directs the Center for Coastal Resources Management at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science. His research interests are in tidal and nontidal wetlands ecology, landscape ecology, and resource management/policy issues. He has active interests in resource inventory procedures, habitat restoration protocols, resource management “expert system” development, and science policy interactions. He received his B.S. degree from Bucknell University and his Ph.D. degree from the University of Virginia. Fredrick J. Hitzhusen is a professor in the Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics. His primary research in-

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Adaptive Management for Water Resources Project Planning terests include the economics of sustainable agriculture, forest, and mining systems with emphasis on off-site soil sediment and water quality costs; the economics of renewable energy; and the economics of delivering and financing nonmetropolitan or rural government services. He received his B.S. degree in agricultural education from Iowa State University, his M.S. degree in agricultural economics from Purdue University, and his Ph.D. degree in resource economics from Cornell University. Charles D. D. Howard was the Founder and past President of Charles Howard & Associates, Ltd. and has been an independent consulting engineer since 1969 in the field of water resources engineering. He has provided advice regarding water resource system operations and planning to water and power utilities, provincial, state, and federal governments in Canada and the U.S., the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the World Bank. In 1998 he received the Julian Hinds Award of the American Society of Civil Engineers. He has participated in several National Research Council committees and boards including: Water Science and Technology Board, 1996-1999; Committee on Water Resources in the Middle East, 1995-98; and the Committee on Irrigation Water Quality Problems, 1987-96. Mr. Howard earned his B.S. and his M.S. degrees from the University of Alberta, and his M.S. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. William R. Lowry is an associate professor in the political sciences department at Washington University. He received a B.S. degree (1979) in business administration from Indiana University, an M.B.A degree (1983) from the University of Illinois—Chicago, and M.A. (1985) and Ph.D. (1988) degrees in political science from Stanford University. His research interests include political institutions and public policy with a particular focus on the environment and public lands. He has written extensively on politics and public commons. Dr. Lowry received his Ph.D. in political science from Stanford University. Barry R. Noon is a professor at the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Biology in Colorado State University, Fort Collins. Before joining the faculty of CSU, he was a research wildlife biologist and later a research ecologist with the U.S. Forest Service. He has held teaching positions at Humboldt State University in Arcata, California and Sienna College in New York. His fields of interests include conservation planning for threatened and endangered species, science-based management of public lands to conserve biological diversity, population dynamics and

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Adaptive Management for Water Resources Project Planning viability analysis for at-risk species, and vertebrate demography and life history. He received his B.A. degree in biology from Princeton University and his Ph.D. degree in biology from the State University of New York in Albany. Robert W. Sterner is a professor at and the current head of the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior at the University of Minnesota. Before joining the faculty at the University of Minnesota, he was a member of the faculty at the University of Texas in Arlington, Texas and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for Limnology in Plon, Germany. His research interests are in the areas of limnology, plankton ecology, food webs, aquatic biogeochemistry, and nutrient dynamics. His research combines ecosystem science with population processes such as competition and predation. He received his B.S. degree in biology from the University of Illinois and his Ph.D. degree from the University of Minnesota. Thayer Scudder is a professor at the Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California. His research encompasses the fields of river basin development, forced relocation, and refugee reintegration in many areas around the world including Africa, India, Nepal, Jordan, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, and the United States. Dr. Scudder graduated cum laude in general studies from Harvard College in 1952 with a concentration in anthropology and biology. He received his Ph.D. degree in anthropology from Harvard University. After leaving Harvard, Dr. Scudder spent a year at the London School of Economics doing a postdoctorate in African Studies, Anthropology and Ecology. After positions with the Rhodes-Livingston Institute for Social Research in Northern Rhodesia 1956-1957 and again in 1962-1963, and a post at the American University in Cairo in 1961-1962, Dr. Scudder joined the faculty at CalTech. National Research Council Staff Jeffrey W. Jacobs is a senior program officer at the Water Science and Technology Board of the National Research Council. His research interests include organizational and policy arrangements for water resources planning, water resources science and policy relations, and river system management. He has studied these issues extensively in Southeast Asia and in the United States, and has conducted comparative research be-

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Adaptive Management for Water Resources Project Planning tween water management issues in the United States and Southeast Asia. He received his B.S. degree from Texas A&M University, his M.A. degree from the University of California (Riverside) and his Ph.D. degree from the University of Colorado. Ellen A. De Guzman is a research associate with the Water Science and Technology Board of the National Research Council. She has worked on a number of studies including Privatization of Water Services in the United States, Review of the USGS National Water Quality Assessment Program, and Drinking Water Contaminants (Phase II). She co-edits the WSTB newsletter, annual report, and manages the WSTB homepage. She received her B.A. degree from the University of the Philippines. Jon Q. Sanders is a senior program assistant with the Water Science and Technology Board. He received his B.A. degree in anthropology from Trinity University. He is a member of the Society for Applied Anthropology and the American Indian Science and Engineering Society. Mr. Sanders has worked on a variety of projects at the WSTB ranging from desalination to Everglades restoration. He is coauthor of “Sitting Down at the Table: Mediation and Resolution of Water Conflicts” (2001). Jon’s research interests include political ecology, Texas water issues, and environmental decision making.