Appendix G
Biographical Information of Panel Members and Staff

Gregory B. Baecher, Chair, is a professor in the civil engineering program at the University of Maryland. Prior to this, Dr. Baecher served on the faculty of civil engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1976 to 1988, and he served as the CEO and founder of Con-Solve Incorporated, Lexington, Massachusetts, from 1988 to 1995. His fields of expertise include risk analysis, water resources engineering, and statistical methods. Dr. Baecher is currently a member of the Water Science and Technology Board. Dr. Baecher received his B.S. degree in civil engineering from the University of California-Berkeley and his M.S. and his Ph.D. degrees in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

John B. Braden is director of the Environment Council and a professor of agricultural and consumer economics at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. He also served as director of the Illinois Water Resources Center and associate provost among other appointments at the University of Illinois. His current research includes economics of river systems, valuation of environmental quality, environment and development. He received a B.A. in economics from Miami University, Ohio, and an M.S., an M.A., and a Ph.D. degrees in agricultural and applied economics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

David L. Galat is an associate professor at the Department of Fishery and Wildlife Sciences at the University of Missouri and assistant unit leader for fisheries at the Missouri Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit of the U.S. Geological Survey. The focus of his research is on predicting how environmental factors influence the structure and function of large river-floodplain communities and ecosystems by defining historical and existing patterns, evaluating the influence of human activities, and applying this to restoration and enhancement of aquatic resources ranging in scale from species to landscapes. He received his



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Analytical Methods and Approaches for Water Resources Project Planning Appendix G Biographical Information of Panel Members and Staff Gregory B. Baecher, Chair, is a professor in the civil engineering program at the University of Maryland. Prior to this, Dr. Baecher served on the faculty of civil engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1976 to 1988, and he served as the CEO and founder of Con-Solve Incorporated, Lexington, Massachusetts, from 1988 to 1995. His fields of expertise include risk analysis, water resources engineering, and statistical methods. Dr. Baecher is currently a member of the Water Science and Technology Board. Dr. Baecher received his B.S. degree in civil engineering from the University of California-Berkeley and his M.S. and his Ph.D. degrees in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. John B. Braden is director of the Environment Council and a professor of agricultural and consumer economics at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. He also served as director of the Illinois Water Resources Center and associate provost among other appointments at the University of Illinois. His current research includes economics of river systems, valuation of environmental quality, environment and development. He received a B.A. in economics from Miami University, Ohio, and an M.S., an M.A., and a Ph.D. degrees in agricultural and applied economics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. David L. Galat is an associate professor at the Department of Fishery and Wildlife Sciences at the University of Missouri and assistant unit leader for fisheries at the Missouri Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit of the U.S. Geological Survey. The focus of his research is on predicting how environmental factors influence the structure and function of large river-floodplain communities and ecosystems by defining historical and existing patterns, evaluating the influence of human activities, and applying this to restoration and enhancement of aquatic resources ranging in scale from species to landscapes. He received his

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Analytical Methods and Approaches for Water Resources Project Planning B.S. degree from Cornell University and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Colorado State University. Gerald E. Galloway, Jr. is research professor at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is also vice president of the Enterprise Engineering Group at the Titan Corporation, Fairfax, Virginia. He also served as secretary of the United States Section of the International Joint Commission in Washington, D.C. Dr. Galloway has served as a consultant on a variety of water resources engineering and management issues to the Executive Office of the President, World Bank, the Organization of American States, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Dr. Galloway is a former dean of the Academic Board (chief academic officer) of the United States Military Academy. Dr. Galloway holds master’s degrees from Princeton, Penn State, and the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. Dr. Galloway received his Ph.D. degree in geography from the University of North Carolina. Robert G. Healy is a professor of resource and environmental policy and public policy studies at Duke University. He also directed the Center for International Studies at Duke from 1994 to 1996. Before going to Duke in 1986, he was a senior associate at the Conservation Foundation– World Wildlife Fund in Washington, D.C. His current research interests are in land use and environmental policy in rapidly growing areas; environmental policy in developing countries; interactions between conservation and economic development; tourism planning and policy; and policy for parks and protected areas. He received his B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees in economics from the University of California, Los Angeles. Edwin E. Herricks is a professor of environmental biology at the University of Illinois. His research analyzes and interprets the effects of environmental change on species, populations, and communities of organisms in both aquatic and terrestrial environments, with a particular emphasis on the development of methods to improve environmental decision making and ecologically relevant engineering design. Dr. Herrick’s specific research areas include biological monitoring procedures; time-related consequences of contaminant exposure; analysis of organism habitat relationships in streams and wetlands; and development of engineering design approaches that minimize environmental impact. He received his B.A. degree in zoology and english from the University of Kansas, his M.S. degree in sanitary and environmental engineering from

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Analytical Methods and Approaches for Water Resources Project Planning Johns Hopkins University, and his Ph.D. degree in biology from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Catherine L. Kling is a professor of economics and heads the Resource and Environmental Policy Division of the Center for Agricultural Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University. Before joining the faculty of Iowa State University, she taught at the University of California in Davis. Her fields of interest include natural resource and environmental economics, welfare economics, and applied econometrics. In her studies at CARD, Dr. Kling is examining how agricultural practices affect water quality, wildlife, soil carbon content, and greenhouse gases. Dr. Kling received her B.B.A. degree in business and economics from the University of Iowa and her Ph.D. degree in economics from the University of Maryland. Linda A. Malone is the Marshall–Wythe Foundation Professor of Law at the College of William and Mary, where she has worked since 1988. During her career, she has clerked for Judge Wilbur F. Pell, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, and practiced law at Alston, Miller & Gaines in Atlanta and at Ross, Hardies, O’Keefe, Babcock & Parsons in Chicago. She has taught law at the University of Arkansas School of Law and been a visiting professor at the law schools of Duke, Illinois, Arizona, Denver, Virginia, and Washington & Lee. Ms. Malone is the author of several publications, including a treatise Environmental Regulation of Land Use and a casebook Environmental Law. She is also the associate editor of the Yearbook of International Environmental Law and a member of the Advisory Board of the National Enforcement Training Institute of the Environmental Protection Agency. She received her B.A. degree from Vassar, her J.D. degree from Duke University, and her LL.M. from the University of Illinois. Ram Mohan is vice president and director of coastal engineering for Blasland, Bouck & Lee (BBL) Inc. Dr. Mohan is a registered P.E. in the State of Maryland and has more than 14 years of experience in dredging systems, port and harbor planning, river and channel hydraulics, coastal modeling, contaminated sediments, and environmental planning. He also serves on the board of directors for the Association of Coastal Engineers and the Western Dredging Association, and chairs the Physical Oceanography Committee of the Marine Technology Society. He is adjunct faculty member at Johns Hopkins Whiting School of Engineering and at Texas A&M University’s Center for Dredging Studies. He received his

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Analytical Methods and Approaches for Water Resources Project Planning B.S. degree in naval architecture from Cochin University of Science and Technology, India, his M.S. degree in ocean engineering from the University of Rhode Island; and his Ph.D. degree in coastal engineering from Texas A&M University. Max J. Pfeffer is a professor of development sociology and associate director of the Agricultural Experiment Station at Cornell University. His research has focused on the social aspects of agriculture, the environment, and development planning. He has done recent work on the social dimensions of watershed planning within the New York City watershed, and he works on natural resource management in Central America as well. Dr. Pfeffer was a member of the National Research Council’s Watershed Management Committee and the Committee to Review the New York City Watershed Management Strategy. He received his Ph.D. degree in sociology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 1986. Doug Plasencia is a consultant at AMEC Earth and Environmental in Phoenix, Arizona. He also worked as an engineer and vice president of Kimley-Horn & Associates in Phoenix, Arizona. He has more than 17 years of experience in the field of floodplain management and stormwater management working for public agencies and most recently as a consulting engineer, and a professional engineer in Arizona, Nevada, and Virginia. Mr. Plasencia develops watershed- and river-based plans that integrate technology, policy, and implementation into long-term management strategies. He worked with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Sacramento to develop the nation’s first nonstructural emergency recovery program for a long-term reassessment of the Sacramento and San Joaquin River basins. Mr. Plasencia was also a hydrologist with the Flood Control District of Maricopa County, Phoenix, Arizona, and chief of flood protection for the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation. He received his B.S. degree in forest resource management form the University of Minnesota and his M.S. degree in watershed management from the University of Arizona. Denise J. Reed has been a professor at in the Department of geology and geophysics at the University of New Orleans, Louisiana, since 1998. Previously she was an associate professor at Louisiana University. Her research interests include sediment dynamics in coastal wetlands with emphasis on sediment mobilization and marsh hydrology, both natural and altered, as factors controlling sediment deposition. Her current re-

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Analytical Methods and Approaches for Water Resources Project Planning search includes sediment dynamics and restoration in Louisiana, the Columbia River estuary, and the Sacramento-San Joaquin delta. Dr. Reed earned her B.A. and Ph.D. degrees in geography from the University of Cambridge, United Kingdom. Jan A. Veltrop (NAE) is a consulting engineer. He retired in 1994 after 37 years with Harza Engineering Company where he served as chief engineer, executive vice president and director. Mr. Veltrop worked on hydroelectric dam projects around the world, including India, Pakistan, Taiwan, Iran, China, Israel, and the United States. During a leave of absence from Harza, he served as Dean of the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Nigeria, Nsukka from 1964 to 1967. Dr. Veltrop was chairman of the U.S. Committee on Large Dams (now USSD) and President of the International Commission on Large Dams. Dr. Veltrop received the Rickey Medal from the ASCE in 1997 for his contributions in the field of hydroelectric engineering. He also served as a Commissioner of the World Commission on Dams in August 1998. He received his B.S. degree from the Technological University of Delft, Netherlands; his M.S. degree from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; and his Ph.D. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. STAFF Jeffrey W. Jacobs is a senior program officer at the Water Science and Technology Board of the National Research Council. His research interests include organizational and policy arrangements for water resources planning, water resources science and policy relations, and river system management. He has studied these issues extensively in Southeast Asia’s Mekong River basin and in the United States, and has conducted comparative research between water management issues in the United States and Southeast Asia. He received his B.S. degree from Texas A&M University, his M.A. degree from the University of California (Riverside) and his Ph.D. degree from the University of Colorado. Ellen A. De Guzman is a research associate with the Water Science and Technology Board of the National Research Council. She has worked on a number of studies including Privatization of Water Services in the United States, Review of the USGS National Water Quality Assessment Program, and Drinking Water Contaminants (Phase II). She co-edits the WSTB newsletter, annual report, and manages the WSTB homepage. She received her B.A. degree from the University of the Philippines.