Appendix

Short Biographies

James C. McGroddy, Chair, retired from IBM as a senior vice president, research at the end of 1996, after leading its research laboratories from 1989 to 1995. During his tenure, which spanned the period of IBM’s most difficult challenges, he led a major restructuring of its research efforts, building a model and management system that is now widely emulated. One of the measures of success was the creation during this period of two new laboratories, one in Beijing and one in Austin, Texas. His leadership was recognized by his being awarded the Frederik Philips Medal of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the George Pake Award of the American Physical Society. He is currently an advisor to several government agencies, is a participant in a number of National Research Council groups, and serves as an advisor and a visitor at a number of universities in the United States and Europe. McGroddy is the chairman of the board of MIQS, a company providing clinical information systems and electronic medical record capability aimed at improving the quality and cost-effectiveness of the care of the chronically ill. As chairman of the board of the Stellaris Healthcare Network in 2000 and 2001 and as former chairman of the board of Phelps Memorial Hospital Center, he has been heavily involved in the restructuring of the local health care delivery system in Westchester County. He is a director of Paxar, Inc., and of Advanced Networks and Services, Inc. He is also a trustee of his alma mater, St. Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, as well as a member of the advisory boards of a number of start-up firms and university departments. McGroddy originally joined IBM in its Research Division in 1965 after receiving a PhD in physics from the University of Maryland. He earned his BS in physics from St. Joseph’s University in Philadelphia in 1958. In his first years at IBM, he focused on research in solid state physics and electronic devices, and as a result of achievements in these areas was named a fellow of both the IEEE and the American Physical Society. In the 1970-1971 academic year, he was a visiting professor of physics at the Danish Technical University. Returning to IBM, he served in a number of management positions in research, development, and manufacturing before being named IBM’s director of research in 1989. He is a member of the U.S. National



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 57
A Review of the FBI’s Trilogy Information Technology Modernization Program Appendix Short Biographies James C. McGroddy, Chair, retired from IBM as a senior vice president, research at the end of 1996, after leading its research laboratories from 1989 to 1995. During his tenure, which spanned the period of IBM’s most difficult challenges, he led a major restructuring of its research efforts, building a model and management system that is now widely emulated. One of the measures of success was the creation during this period of two new laboratories, one in Beijing and one in Austin, Texas. His leadership was recognized by his being awarded the Frederik Philips Medal of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the George Pake Award of the American Physical Society. He is currently an advisor to several government agencies, is a participant in a number of National Research Council groups, and serves as an advisor and a visitor at a number of universities in the United States and Europe. McGroddy is the chairman of the board of MIQS, a company providing clinical information systems and electronic medical record capability aimed at improving the quality and cost-effectiveness of the care of the chronically ill. As chairman of the board of the Stellaris Healthcare Network in 2000 and 2001 and as former chairman of the board of Phelps Memorial Hospital Center, he has been heavily involved in the restructuring of the local health care delivery system in Westchester County. He is a director of Paxar, Inc., and of Advanced Networks and Services, Inc. He is also a trustee of his alma mater, St. Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, as well as a member of the advisory boards of a number of start-up firms and university departments. McGroddy originally joined IBM in its Research Division in 1965 after receiving a PhD in physics from the University of Maryland. He earned his BS in physics from St. Joseph’s University in Philadelphia in 1958. In his first years at IBM, he focused on research in solid state physics and electronic devices, and as a result of achievements in these areas was named a fellow of both the IEEE and the American Physical Society. In the 1970-1971 academic year, he was a visiting professor of physics at the Danish Technical University. Returning to IBM, he served in a number of management positions in research, development, and manufacturing before being named IBM’s director of research in 1989. He is a member of the U.S. National

OCR for page 57
A Review of the FBI’s Trilogy Information Technology Modernization Program Academy of Engineering. McGroddy chaired the CSTB committee that produced the report Realizing the Potential of C4I: Fundamental Challenges. Ed Balkovich is a senior engineer at RAND. His current research focuses on telecommunications and information technologies, and infrastructure. Prior to joining RAND, he was a director in the technology organization of Verizon Communications (formerly Bell Atlantic). While at Verizon, he led technology assessment activities focused on the use of IP networks in telecommunications. His work included the design and deployment of Verizon’s first voice services for IP networks, and prototypes of video, voice, and VPN concepts delivered by DSL access and IP networks. In addition to technology assessment, he also played a significant role in understanding and explaining the policy implications of emerging technologies and IP networks. His policy contributions concerned both regulatory and law enforcement issues. While at Verizon, he served on the CSTB committee that produced Realizing the Potential of C4I: Fundamental Challenges, and a follow-up workshop convened to explore a security recommendation made in the committee’s report. Before joining Verizon, he was a member of Digital Equipment Corporation’s Cambridge Research Lab. While at Digital he was the first associate director of MIT’s Project Athena (which developed X-windows, Kerberos authentication, and Zepher messaging). He contributed to various engineering and research projects, as well as customer applications spanning the areas of clustered computing, telecommunications, virtual private networks, and electronic publishing. His work with customer applications helped to define and create an internal consulting organization supporting leading-edge applications of computing and networks by customers. He worked in the aerospace industry prior to joining Digital. In addition to his industrial experience, he has held research and academic appointments at MIT, Brandeis, the University of Connecticut, and the University of California. He holds doctorate and master’s degrees in electrical engineering from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a bachelor’s degree in mathematics from the University of California, Berkeley. Richard J. Baseil was most recently with the MITRE Corporation, managing MITRE’s systems engineering of IT for the U.S. Army. He was also with Cisco Systems, working on voice services over data communications networks. Previously, he was vice president in Telcordia Technologies’ Professional Services organization. Mr. Baseil has managed product testing and quality analyses of telecommunications switching, signaling, transport, and customer-premise systems, with an emphasis on hardware and software interoperability. He also advises telecommunications service providers on improvements to their procurement processes for network systems. Mr. Baseil played a major role in defining the industry need for, and subsequently establishing, a multi-company Internet work interoperability test planning effort in the United States, and he managed the Telcordia staff and the interconnection facility used by industry participants to conduct nationwide signaling and interoperability testing. Mr. Baseil has 30 years of IT and telecommunications experience, having had responsibility for switching systems engineering, signaling network engineering, operations systems engineering, operating services system requirements, network database requirements, ISDN data services engineering, billing services, and some early descriptive work on next-generation switching systems. Mr. Baseil holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in electrical engineering from the New Jersey Institute of Technology. He served on the CSTB committee that produced Realizing the Potential of C4I: Fundamental Challenges.

OCR for page 57
A Review of the FBI’s Trilogy Information Technology Modernization Program Matt Blaze, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania, studies the use of cryptography in computing and network security. His research focuses on the architecture and design of secure systems based on cryptographic techniques, analysis of secure systems against practical attack models, and finding new cryptographic primitives and techniques. He is the co-inventor of the field of trust management, and he headed the KeyNote project at AT&T Laboratories. His recent work and collaborations have led to the creation of new cryptographic concepts, including remotely keyed encryption, atomic proxy cryptography, and master-key cryptography. His research has also been influential in IP network-layer, session-layer, and file-system encryption. Blaze has discovered weaknesses in a number of published and fielded security systems, including a protocol failure in the U.S. Clipper key-escrow system. Blaze has long been active in the debate on encryption and security policy, has testified before Congress several times, has participated in influential public-policy panels and reports, and created the Web resource crypto.com. He holds a PhD in computer science from Princeton University. W. Earl Boebert is an expert on information security, with experience in national security and intelligence as well as commercial applications and needs. He is a senior scientist at Sandia National Laboratories. He has 30 years of experience in communications and computer security, is the holder or co-holder of 13 patents, and has participated in CSTB studies on security matters. Prior to joining Sandia, he was the technical founder and chief scientist of Secure Computing Corporation, where he developed the Sidewinder security server, a system that currently protects several thousand sites. Before that he worked for 22 years at Honeywell, rising to the position of senior research fellow. At Honeywell he worked on secure systems, cryptographic devices, flight software, and a variety of real-time simulation and control systems, and he won Honeywell’s highest award for technical achievement for his part in developing a very large scale radar landmass simulator. He also developed and presented a course on systems engineering and project management that was eventually given to more than 3,000 students in 13 countries. He served on the CSTB committees that produced Computers at Risk: Safe Computing in the Information Age, For the Record: Protecting Electronic Health Information, and Information Technology for Counterterrorism: Immediate Actions and Future Possibilities. He also participated in two of CSTB’s workshops, “Cyber-Attack” and “Insider Threat.” Marc Donner is an executive director in the Institutional Securities Division of Morgan Stanley, where he focuses on system and data architecture around client relationships. His recent projects have included initiating Morgan Stanley’s Internet presence and intranet activities and modernizing a number of legacy systems. He received a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the California Institute of Technology and a doctorate in computer science from Carnegie Mellon University. He is a member of the IEEE Computer Society and Usenix. Michael McGill has more than 30 years of hands-on experience in information technology and more than 12 years in health care technology. He has been responsible for systemwide operations and for the development of information systems. He has also been responsible for the development of clinical data repositories, overseen the implementation of clinical and administrative systems, and developed support architectures that allow secure and reliable access. Dr. McGill was the corporate vice president and chief information officer of the Henry Ford Health System, an integrated health care delivery system. Prior to that he was the chief information officer of the University of Michigan Health System. At the University of Michigan,

OCR for page 57
A Review of the FBI’s Trilogy Information Technology Modernization Program McGill also headed its telecommunication networks and phone service. He led the evolution of the electronic information resources at both the University of Michigan and Henry Ford. Dr. McGill served as a director of industry marketing with Ameritech Information Systems. He was vice president of Online Computer Library Center, Inc. At Syracuse University, he held the positions of associate professor, assistant dean for research and the PhD program, School of Information Studies, and associate professor in the School of Computer and Information Science. He was program director for information science for the National Science Foundation and a senior computer and information science advisor, Office of Toxic Substances, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Michigan State University and master’s and doctoral degrees in computer science from Syracuse University. Dr. McGill is a member of the American Medical Informatics Association, the College of Health Information Management Executives, and the Health Information Management Systems Society. He has been elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science for his “pioneering research and development in information systems.” He is also the author of numerous articles and co-author of Introduction to Modern Information Retrieval, published by McGraw-Hill. James Noga is the CIO for the Massachusetts General Hospital. The 875-bed hospital with over 1.4 million ambulatory visits annually is a world-renowned medical center offering sophisticated diagnostic and therapeutic care, and it conducts the largest hospital-based research program in the United States. He came to the MGH in 1990 as director of clinical applications and in 1997 became the CIO. He has been instrumental in advancing clinical systems at the MGH with the introduction of an online enterprise clinical reporting system, provider order entry, and an ambulatory electronic medical record. In addition to clinical systems his current focus is on improving patient revenue cycle systems. He is also a contributor to the recently published book Effective Healthcare Information Management: Leadership Roles, Challenges, and Solutions on the topics of software procurement and integration strategies. Mr. Noga holds an MS degree in biomedical computing and information processing from the Ohio State University and is an active member of the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives and Society of Information Management. Carl G. O’Berry is vice president, Strategic Architecture, Integrated Defense Systems, The Boeing Company. He was previously deputy chief of staff for Command, Control, Communications & Computers, Headquarters, U.S. Air Force, a position from which he directed Air Force-wide information systems planning and policy development. Earlier in his Air Force career, he served as commander of the Air Force Rome Air Development Center and as joint program manager, World-Wide Military Command and Control System Information System. He also led the development and field testing of an airborne radar sensing/tracking system that was the forerunner of the Joint Surveillance and Target Attack Radar System. He has a master’s degree in systems management from the Air Force Institute of Technology and a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from New Mexico State University. He served on the CSTB committee that produced Realizing the Potential of C4I: Fundamental Challenges. He retired from the U.S. Air Force as a lieutenant general in August 1995. From then until December 1998, he was vice president and director of planning and information technology for Motorola, the Space and Systems Technology Group, in Scottsdale, Arizona.

OCR for page 57
A Review of the FBI’s Trilogy Information Technology Modernization Program Ken Orr is an internationally recognized expert on data warehousing, knowledge management, software engineering, business process reengineering, and technology transfer. He is the founder and principal researcher of the Ken Orr Institute, a business technology research organization. Previously, Mr. Orr was an affiliate professor and director of the Center for the Innovative Application of Technology with the School of Technology and Information Management at Washington University in St. Louis. Mr. Orr has more than 39 years of experience in research, analysis, design, project management, technology planning, and management consulting. His clients have included such organizations as the states of California, Illinois, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Oregon, and Washington, the city of Chicago, the U.S. Army, Navy, and Marine Corps, the FAA, IBM, DEC, Detroit Edison, Xerox, Olivetti (Italy), Philip Morris, Pacific Bell (SBC), Bellcore (Telcordia), Burlington-Santa Fe Railroad, Kellwood Corporation, Phoenix International (Canada), and many others. Mr. Orr has written three books (Structured Systems Development, Structured Requirements Definition, and The One Minute Methodology) and is the author of dozens of articles on advanced software development, technology management, and human communication. Mr. Orr was also one of the principal developers of the DSSD (Warnier-Orr) methodology, as well as a leading researcher in the development of automated tools for automatic program generation, database design, business requirements, and advanced client/server prototyping. James Patton is a technical director with the MITRE Corporation, currently helping lead an organization of over 200 persons devoted to numerous information systems challenges of the extended intelligence and law enforcement communities. He has nearly 30 years of information systems experience, with over 20 of those years focused on the peculiar needs and challenges of distributed systems for intelligence support. Mr. Patton has done performance engineering, including synthetic workload modeling and benchmarking, as well as providing and managing the provision of systems engineering expertise for the acquisition of large-scale distributed systems through all phases of the systems engineering process. He has managed work programs seeking to apply current and near-term information technologies in innovative ways to address challenging intelligence problems. Mr. Patton received a bachelor’s degree in mathematics from Loyola College and did graduate study in applied mathematics and computer science at Rice University. Mark Seiden is a senior consultant with Cutter’s Business-IT Strategies Practice and a member of the Leadership Group of Cutter Consortium’s Risk Management Intelligence Network. He has consulted since 1983 in the areas of security, network, and software engineering to companies worldwide, with clients including start-ups, major computer and communication companies, financial institutions, law firms, UN agencies, online content providers, Internet service providers, research organizations, and nonprofits. As an independent consultant, and in varying roles at Securify (also known as Kroll O’Gara Information Security Group), his most recent projects have included design, architecture, and implementation for e-business systems; security for online financial transaction processing and distributed document processing systems; custom firewalls based on open-source components; finding computer criminals; and penetration testing of the network and physical security of deployed systems, enterprises, and colocation facilities. Mr. Seiden has 35 years of programming experience. He has been a Unix and mainframe system programmer; written Macintosh applications; spent time at IBM Research, Xerox Parc, Bell Labs, and Bellcore; and has taught at the university level. Mr. Seiden has been

OCR for page 57
A Review of the FBI’s Trilogy Information Technology Modernization Program on the board of directors of two user groups and is on the Technical Advisory Board of Counterpane Security Systems. George Spix is chief architect in the Consumer Platforms Division of Microsoft Corporation. He is responsible for Microsoft’s end-to-end solutions for consumer appliances and public networks. He also serves on the board of the Digital Audio Video Council, the Information Infrastructure Standards Panel, the Commerce Department’s Computer Systems’ Security and Privacy Advisory Board, and a National Research Council study focused on trusted computing systems. Mr. Spix joined Microsoft in 1993 as the director of multimedia document architecture. He was responsible for the Advanced Consumer Technology Division’s multimedia tools efforts and early third-party tools acquisitions. Later, as director of infrastructure and services, he led a team that created the services and networks required for early interactive television trials. Before coming to Microsoft, Mr. Spix spent 5 years as director of systems and software development at Supercomputer Systems, Inc., in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. He was responsible for the delivery of systems and software products for a next-generation super-computer. Prior to that, he worked for Cray Research, Inc., in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, as a chief engineer and was responsible for systems and software development for the XMP and YMP line of supercomputers. A Purdue University electrical engineer, Mr. Spix was drawn to supercomputers, their systems, and applications while at the Los Alamos National Laboratories. Charles E. Stuart is president and CEO of Competitive Enterprise Solutions, LLC (CESLLC), a networking and information technology consulting firm he founded in 1999. At CESLLC he has contributed to projects addressing computer security, machine learning, and enterprise collaboration. In the past year he has been supporting the development of a next-generation intrusion detection system with sponsorship from DARPA and Rome Laboratories and is currently working with a client to commercialize that technology. Prior to founding CESLLC, Mr. Stuart spent 20 years in government service. As a senior executive in the Department of Energy’s Nuclear Weapons Program, Mr. Stuart was responsible for implementing enterprise collaboration tools for streamlining and improving design and manufacturing processes at the plants and national laboratories. These included Web-based tools for resource planning as well as for design modeling and simulation. In addition, for 2 years he was a manager in the Advanced Simulation and Computing Initiative, which produced the first teraop computing platform, and in 1998 he led a study of networking security requirements for the weapons complex. During the Cold War, prior to his DOE service, Mr. Stuart spent 25 years as both a contractor and civil servant in the field of undersea warfare. He founded and headed the Maritime Systems Technology Office at DARPA, where he served as both a program manager and office director. In 1985 he received the Bushnell Award from the American Defense Preparedness Association for his career contributions to undersea warfare. Mr. Stuart holds a BSEE degree from Duke University and completed a 2-year program in business and management. His biography is included in Who’s Who in America and Who’s Who in Science and Engineering. He is a member of the IEEE and the National Defense Industrial Association. Gio Wiederhold is a professor (emeritus) of computer science, medicine, and electrical engineering at Stanford University. He started working with computers for numerical applications in 1957. In the late 1960s he led the development of real-time data acquisition and database systems to support clinical research. Derivative products from that work are still

OCR for page 57
A Review of the FBI’s Trilogy Information Technology Modernization Program being used at Stanford and around the world. After gaining 16 years of industrial experience, he returned to school and joined the Stanford faculty in 1976. At Stanford he initiated research into knowledge-based techniques for information and database management. This research direction, starting with the KBMS project at Stanford in 1977, has now become an active research field in its own right. Results derived from this work help in the management of complex information systems, as found in medicine, especially long-term-care records, manufacturing systems, and planning applications. His current focus has shifted to the problems encountered in the integration and composition of large-scale networked and software systems. He holds a PhD in medical information science from the University of California, San Francisco, and a degree in aeronautical engineering from TMS Technicum in Rotterdam, Holland. Dr. Wiederhold has been a fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He has participated with the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board and has served on numerous National Research Council committees. He has also been a DARPA program manager. Staff Members Herbert S. Lin is senior scientist and senior staff officer at the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, National Research Council of the National Academies, where he has been the study director of major projects on public policy and information technology. These studies include a 1996 study on national cryptography policy (Cryptography’s Role in Securing the Information Society), a 1991 study on the future of computer science (Computing the Future), a 1999 study of Defense Department systems for command, control, communications, computing, and intelligence (Realizing the Potential of C4I: Fundamental Challenges), and a 2000 study on workforce issues in high-technology (Building a Workforce for the Information Economy). Prior to his NRC service, he was a professional staff member and staff scientist for the House Armed Services Committee (1986-1990), where his portfolio included defense policy and arms control issues. He also has significant expertise in math and science education. He received his PhD in physics from MIT in 1979. Avocationally, he is a longtime folk and swing dancer, and a poor magician. Apart from his CSTB work, a list of publications in cognitive science, science education, biophysics, and arms control and defense policy is available on request. Kristen Batch is a research associate with the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council. She will be involved with upcoming projects focusing on wireless communication technologies and telecommunications research and development. While pursuing an MA in international communications from American University, she interned at the National Telecommunications and Information Administration, in the Office of International Affairs, and at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, in the Technology and Public Policy Program. She also earned a BA from Carnegie Mellon University in literary and cultural studies and Spanish, and received two travel grants to conduct independent research in Spain.

OCR for page 57
A Review of the FBI’s Trilogy Information Technology Modernization Program This page intentionally left blank.