Appendix C
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

G. WAYNE CLOUGH (chair) is president of the Georgia Institute of Technology and a recognized leader in engineering education and research. A civil engineer, he holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Georgia Tech and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. He served on the faculties of Stanford and Duke universities before becoming head of the civil engineering department and then dean of the College of Engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Prior to returning to his alma mater as president, he was provost and vice president for academic affairs at the University of Washington. His professional expertise in geotechnical and earthquake engineering is reflected in the 120 papers and reports and six book chapters he has published. He has consulted with 60 firms and boards and is presently a special consultant to San Francisco’s Bay Area Rapid Transit for ongoing major seismic retrofit operations. His broader interests include technology and higher education policy, economic development, diversity in higher education, and technology in a global setting. In 2001, President George W. Bush appointed Dr. Clough to the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, and he chairs the panel on federal research and development. He is also a member of the executive committee of the U.S. Council on Competitiveness. He received the 2001 National Engineering Award from the American Association of Engineering Societies, and the American Society of Civil Engineers has recognized him with seven national



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The Engineer of 2020: Visions of Engineering in the New Century Appendix C Biographical Sketches of Committee Members G. WAYNE CLOUGH (chair) is president of the Georgia Institute of Technology and a recognized leader in engineering education and research. A civil engineer, he holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Georgia Tech and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. He served on the faculties of Stanford and Duke universities before becoming head of the civil engineering department and then dean of the College of Engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Prior to returning to his alma mater as president, he was provost and vice president for academic affairs at the University of Washington. His professional expertise in geotechnical and earthquake engineering is reflected in the 120 papers and reports and six book chapters he has published. He has consulted with 60 firms and boards and is presently a special consultant to San Francisco’s Bay Area Rapid Transit for ongoing major seismic retrofit operations. His broader interests include technology and higher education policy, economic development, diversity in higher education, and technology in a global setting. In 2001, President George W. Bush appointed Dr. Clough to the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, and he chairs the panel on federal research and development. He is also a member of the executive committee of the U.S. Council on Competitiveness. He received the 2001 National Engineering Award from the American Association of Engineering Societies, and the American Society of Civil Engineers has recognized him with seven national

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The Engineer of 2020: Visions of Engineering in the New Century awards. He is one of the few to have been twice honored with civil engineering’s oldest award, the Norman Medal. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1990. ALICE M. AGOGINO is the Roscoe and Elizabeth Hughes Professor of Mechanical Engineering and directs several computational and design research and instructional laboratories at the University of California (UC), Berkeley. She received a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of New Mexico, an M.S. in mechanical engineering in 1978 from UC Berkeley, and a Ph.D. from the Department of Engineering-Economic Systems at Stanford University in 1984. She has authored over 120 scholarly publications in the areas of microelectronic mechanical systems/mechatronics design methods; nonlinear optimization; intelligent learning systems; multiobjective and strategic product design; probabilistic modeling; intelligent control and manufacturing; graphics, multimedia, and computer-aided design; design databases; digital libraries; artificial intelligence and decision and expert systems; and gender and technology. She has won numerous teaching, best paper, and research awards. Dr. Agogino is known internationally as a leader in engineering education and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering’s Committee on Engineering Education. She served as director for Synthesis, a National Science Foundation/industry-sponsored coalition of eight universities with the goal of reforming undergraduate engineering education, and continues as principal investigator for the NEEDS (www.needs.org) and SMETE.ORG digital libraries of courseware in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology. Dr. Agogino has also served in a number of administrative positions at UC Berkeley, including associate dean of engineering, director of the Instructional Technology Program, and faculty assistant to the executive vice chancellor and provost in educational development and technology. Professor Agogino is a registered professional mechanical engineer in California and is engaged in a number of collaborative projects with industry. Prior to joining the faculty at UC Berkeley, she worked in industry for Dow Chemical, General Electric, and SRI International. GEORGE CAMPBELL, JR., is president of The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, one of America’s most selective institutions of higher education. Previously, Dr. Campbell served as

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The Engineer of 2020: Visions of Engineering in the New Century president and chief executive officer of NACME, Inc., and in various R&D and management positions at AT&T Bell Laboratories. Earlier in his career, Dr. Campbell served on the faculties of Syracuse University and Nkumbi International College in Zambia. He has published numerous papers and is coeditor of Access Denied: Race, Ethnicity and the Scientific Enterprise (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2000). Dr. Campbell currently serves on the board of directors of Consolidated Edison, Inc., and as a trustee of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Montefiore Medical Center, and the New York Hall of Science. He has also served on a number of science and technology policy bodies, including the Morella Commission of the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Secretary of Energy’s Advisory Board, National Research Council committees and as chair of the New York City Chancellor’s Task Force on Science Education. Among his many awards are two honorary doctorates. A graduate of the Executive Management Program at Yale University, Dr. Campbell earned a Ph.D. in theoretical physics from Syracuse University and a B.S. in physics from Drexel University, where he was a Simon Guggenheim Scholar. JAMES CHAVEZ, prior to being awarded an American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) federal government fellowship, was manager of Sandia National Laboratories government relations organization. In this position he worked closely with Sandia’s leadership and Congress to address national issues on energy, weapons stewardship, and science and technology. Chavez has also participated in the research, development, and demonstration of renewable technologies for utility applications. His responsibilities included managing the activities for the Department of Energy’s Concentrating Solar Power Program and Biomass Power and Solar Buildings Program. He also served as manager of the National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque), the largest solar test facility in the United States. He contributed to the conception, development, construction, and testing of the world’s largest solar power plant, the 10 MWe Solar Two Power Plant in Barstow, California. Chavez earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mechanical engineering from New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, in 1981, and the University of California, Berkeley, in 1982, respectively. In 1997 he was named recipient of the Hispanic Professional Engineers Award for Professional Achievement and became a member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers that same year.

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The Engineer of 2020: Visions of Engineering in the New Century DAVID O. CRAIG is currently director of IT Back Office Applications for Reliant Resources, Inc., in Houston, Texas. He is primarily responsible for development, maintenance, and operations of the Internet and Intranet applications required to support the corporate and retail groups, specifically for the unregulated environment. Prior to joining Reliant in February 2000, Craig was with Compaq Computer Corporation. During his two years there, he was a manager in the Advanced Engineering Group where he was responsible for the design and implementation of the systems and automated equipment required to manufacture and test an advanced digital data monitor. Craig was also responsible for the patent portfolio development and prosecution and for the intellectual property strategy and operations sections of the business plan. Craig was a staff software engineer with IBM Corporation for over nine years, where his expertise was in the development of custom real-time control systems, manufacturing execution systems, and automated manufacturing systems for Fortune 500 companies. In 1996 he received the Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineer Award and participated in the Frontiers of Engineering symposia of the National Academy of Engineering in Irvine, California, and Bremen, Germany. Craig has served on the Society of Manufacturing Engineers Education Foundation Committee for four years and as a Society of Manufacturing Engineers chapter chairman for two years. Craig holds two B.S. degrees from the Texas A&M Dwight Look College of Engineering and an M.S. from the University of Texas at Austin, where he received the George Kozmetsky Award. He holds three U.S. patents, has coauthored 11 publications in IBM’s Technical Disclosure Bulletin, and was recognized with a First Level Invention Award. JOSÉ B. CRUZ, JR., is the Howard D. Winbigler Chair in Engineering and a professor of electrical engineering at Ohio State University. From 1992 to 1997 he served as dean of engineering at Ohio State. He is also secretary of the Section on Engineering for the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Cruz was elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in 1980. He received the Richard E. Bellman Control Heritage Award from the American Automatic Control Council in 1994 and is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, elected in 1968. As a member of the NAE, Cruz currently serves on the Peer Committee on Electronics Engineering and served on the Committee on Diversity in the Engineer-

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The Engineer of 2020: Visions of Engineering in the New Century ing Workforce from 1999 to 2002 and the Academic Advisory Board from 1994 to 1997. Cruz has published several articles in scholarly journals and has edited and coauthored numerous books about electrical engineering. Cruz received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois, Urbana, his S.M. in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and his B.S. in electrical engineering, summa cum laude, from the University of the Philippines. PEGGY GIRSHMAN has been a broadcast journalist for 26 years. She spent her formative years working as a segment and show producer for commercial stations in Washington, D.C., and as a senior producer for several PBS series, including Scientific American Frontiers and a 26-part series on statistics. She had several positions as an editor at National Public Radio (NPR) in science and domestic news and as deputy managing editor. She was part of three start-up operations: Satellite News Channel, Monitor News Channel (Christian Science Monitor), and Video News International (a New York Times company attempting to pioneer the use of small-format video journalism). She has had two journalism fellowships, one at the Marine Biological Lab, the other at MIT. She was a senior medical/science producer at Dateline NBC and is now back at NPR News as an assistant managing editor. She is the winner of a national Emmy award, four local Emmy awards, and two Peabody awards for covering health care and is a cowinner of a science-writing prize from the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She serves on the board of the National Association of Science Writers and on the Journalism Fellowship for Child and Family Policy and has helped select journalists for the Knight Science Journalism Fellowship at MIT. DANIEL E. HASTINGS is currently a professor of aeronautics and astronautics and engineering systems at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He is also director of MIT’s Technology and Policy Program and associate director of the Engineering Systems Division. He served as chief scientist of the Air Force from 1997 to 1999. In that role he served as chief scientific adviser to the chief of staff and the secretary and provided assessments on a wide range of scientific and technical issues affecting the Air Force mission. He led several influential studies on where the Air Force should invest in space, global energy projection, and options for a science and technology workforce for the

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The Engineer of 2020: Visions of Engineering in the New Century 21st century. He received a Ph.D. in aeronautics and astronautics in 1980 from MIT. From 1980 to 1985 he worked for Physical Sciences, Inc., and Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the fields of laser-material interactions and fusion plasma physics. In 1985 he joined the aeronautics and astronautics faculty at MIT as an assistant professor. His research has concentrated on issues related to spacecraft-environmental interactions, space propulsion, space systems engineering, and space policy. He has published many papers and a book on spacecraft-environment interactions and several papers on space propulsion and space systems. He has taught courses and seminars in plasma physics, rocket propulsion, advanced space power and propulsion systems, aerospace policy, and space systems engineering. His recent research has concentrated on issues of space systems and space policy. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and a member of the International Academy of Astronautics. He serves as a member of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Advisory Council and the National Academies Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable and is chair of the Applied Physics Lab Science and Technology Advisory Panel as well as the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. He is a member of the MIT Lincoln Laboratory Advisory Committee and is on the board of trustees of the Aerospace Corporation. He also served as a member of the National Academy of Engineering’s 1996 and 1997 Organizing Committee for the Frontiers of Engineering symposium. He is a consultant to the Institute for Defense Analysis. MICHAEL J. HELLER is a founder of Nanogen, Inc., and has served as its chief technical officer since September 1993. In November 1991, Dr. Heller cofounded Nanogen’s former parent company, Nanotronics, and since that time has served as vice president of research. He cofounded and served as president and chief operating officer of Integrated DNA Technologies from 1987 to 1989 and from 1984 to 1987 served as director of molecular biology for Molecular Biosystems, Inc. Prior to 1984 he served as supervisor of DNA Technology and Molecular Biology for Standard Oil Company. Dr. Heller received a Ph.D. in biochemistry from Colorado State University. DEBORAH G. JOHNSON is the Anne Shirley Carter Olsson Professor of Applied Ethics, Division of Technology, Culture, and Communication, School of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of

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The Engineer of 2020: Visions of Engineering in the New Century Virginia. She is the author/editor of four books: Computer Ethics (now in its third edition; Prentice Hall, 2001), Computers, Ethic and Social Values (coedited with Helen Nissenbaum; Prentice Hall, 1995), Ethical Issues in Engineering (Prentice Hall, 1991), and Ethical Issues in the Use of Computers (coedited with John Snapper; Wadsworth Publishing Co., 1985) and dozens of articles focusing on engineering and computer ethics and technology policy. Active in professional organizations, Professor Johnson has served as president of the Society for Philosophy and Technology, treasurer of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Special Interest Group on Computers and Society (SIGCAS), and chair of the American Philosophical Association Committee on Computer Use in Philosophy. Currently, she serves as president of a new professional society, the International Society for Ethics and Information Technology. In 2000 Professor Johnson received the ACM SIGCAS Making a Difference Award, and in 2001 she received the American Society for Engineering Education Sterling Olmsted Award for “innovative contributions to liberal education within engineering education.” ALAN C. KAY is a senior fellow at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories and founder and president of Viewpoints Research Institute, Inc., best known for the ideas of personal computing, the intimate laptop computer, and the inventions of the now ubiquitous overlapping-window interface and modern object-oriented programming. His deep interests in children and education were the catalysts for these ideas, and they continue to be a source of inspiration to him. One of the founders of the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC), he led one of the several groups that together developed modern workstations (and the forerunners of the Macintosh), Smalltalk, the overlapping-window interface, Desktop Publishing, the Ethernet, Laser printing, and network “client-servers.” Prior to his work at Xerox, Dr. Kay was a member of the University of Utah Advanced Research Projects Agency research team that developed three-dimensional graphics. There he earned a doctorate (with distinction) in 1969 for developing of the first graphical object-oriented personal computer. He holds undergraduate degrees in mathematics and molecular biology from the University of Colorado and master of science and doctoral degrees in computer science from the University of Utah. Kay also participated in the original design of the ARPANet, which later became the Internet. After Xerox PARC, Kay

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The Engineer of 2020: Visions of Engineering in the New Century was chief scientist of Atari, a fellow at Apple Computer for 12 years, and then for 5 years vice president of research and development at the Walt Disney Company. He then founded Viewpoints Research Institute in 2001. Dr. Kay has received numerous honors, including the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Software Systems Award, the ACM Outstanding Educator Award, the J-D Warnier Prix D’Informatique, and the NEC 2001 C&C Prize. He has been elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Royal Society of Arts, and the Computer Museum History Center and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He recently received the ZeroOne Award from the University of Berlin and the National Academy of Engineering’s prestigious Charles Stark Draper Prize for his contributions to the development of the world’s first practical networked personal computers. A former professional jazz guitarist, composer, and theatrical designer, he is now an amateur classical pipe organist. TAREK M. KHALIL received his Ph.D. and M.S. in industrial engineering from Texas Tech University and his B.S. in mechanical engineering from Cairo University. He is a professor of industrial engineering at the University of Miami and holds professorships in biomedical engineering, epidemiology and public health, and neurological surgery. He served as chairman of the University of Miami Department of Industrial Engineering and as dean of the University of Miami Graduate School. He is a registered professional engineer in the state of Florida. Dr. Khalil is the founder and current president of the International Association for Management of Technology and regional vice president of Alpha Pi Mu. He served the Institute of Industrial Engineers (IIE) as chairman of the Council of Fellows, director of the Work Measurement and Methods Engineering Division, vice president of Region IV, member of the Board of Trustees, and president of the Miami Chapter. Dr. Khalil is the recipient of many awards, including the Award for Technical Innovation in Industrial Engineering; Doctor Honoris Causa from the Institut National Polytechnique de Loraine, France; the University of Miami College of Engineering Researcher of the Year Award; the IIE Phil Carroll Award; the David F. Baker Award; the IIE Ergonomics Division Award; the Human Factors Society Paul M. Fitts Award; and the Jack A. Craft Award. He is a member of Alpha Pi Mu, Alpha Epsilon Lambda, Tau Beta Pi, Omicron Delta Kappa, Sigma Xi,

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The Engineer of 2020: Visions of Engineering in the New Century Phi Kappa Phi, and many professional organizations. He is the author of more than 300 publications and many books. ROBERT W. LUCKY is a frequent columnist for IEEE Spectrum, discussing future scenarios of electrical engineers. Dr. Lucky previously appeared on Bill Moyers’s show, “A World of Ideas,” where he discussed the impacts of future technological advances. He is the author of the popular book Silicon Dreams (St. Martin’s Press, 1989), which is a semitechnical and philosophical discussion of the ways in which both humans and computers deal with information. Dr. Lucky attended Purdue University, where he received a B.S. degree in electrical engineering in 1957 and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in 1959 and 1961, respectively. After graduation he joined AT&T Bell Laboratories, where he was initially involved in studying ways of sending digital information over telephone lines. The best-known outcome of this work was his invention of the adaptive equalizer—a technique for correcting distortion in telephone signals that is used in all high-speed data transmissions today. The textbook on data communications that he coauthored became the most cited reference in the communications field over the period of a decade. At Bell Labs he became executive director of the Communications Sciences Research Division in 1982, where he was responsible for research on the methods and technologies for future communications systems. In 1992 he assumed his present position at Telcordia. He has been active in professional activities and has served as president of the Communications Society of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and as vice president and executive vice president of the parent IEEE itself. He has been editor of several technical journals, including the Proceedings of the IEEE, and since 1982 has written the bimonthly “Reflections” column of personalized observations about the engineering profession for Spectrum magazine. A collection of the articles appear in the book, Lucky Strikes … Again (IEEE Press, 1993). JOHN M. MULVEY is professor of operations research and financial engineering in the School of Engineering and Applied Science at Princeton University. He is a leading expert in large-scale optimization models and algorithms, especially financial applications. He has implemented integrated risk management for many large companies,

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The Engineer of 2020: Visions of Engineering in the New Century including American Express, Towers Perrin–Tillinghast, Pacific Mutual, St. Paul Insurance, and Siemens Financial Services. These systems link the key risks within the organization and assist the company in making high-level decisions. In addition, he has built significant planning systems for government agencies, including the Office of Tax Analysis for the Treasury Department, the Joint Chiefs of Staff in the Defense Department, and personal planning for the U.S. Army. He has edited four books and published over 100 scholarly papers. SHARON L. NUNES is currently director of life sciences solutions at IBM, responsible for bringing new technology solutions to the pharmaceutical and biotech markets. She was previously director of technology evaluation, responsible for corporate-wide emerging technologies activities. She has held many management positions at IBM, ranging from research to development and manufacturing, as well as positions in hardware development, software development, and networking. Nunes spent 14 years in IBM research and was responsible for the launch of IBM’s Computational Biology Center in 1997. This worldwide research organization was a key driver in highlighting IBM’s business opportunities in the life sciences market. Nunes received her Ph.D. in materials science in 1983 from the University of Connecticut. She is a member of the Advisory Council of the Whitaker Biomedical Engineering Institute at Johns Hopkins University, a member of the Board of Governors of the Mathematical Sciences Institute at Ohio State University, a member of the Board of Governors of the Advanced Physics Laboratory at Johns Hopkins University, and a member of the Board of Directors of the Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP) Consortium. She was a National Academy of Engineering “Frontiers of Engineering” fellow in 2000. HENRY PETROSKI is the Aleksandar S. Vesic Professor of Civil Engineering and a professor of history at Duke University. He has written on many aspects of engineering and technology, including design, success and failure, error and judgment, the history of engineering and technology, and the use of case studies in education and practice. His books include: To Engineer Is Human (St. Martin’s Press, 1985), The Pencil (Knopf, 1990), The Evolution of Useful Things (Knopf, 1992), Design Paradigms (Cambridge University Press, 1994), Engineers of Dreams (Knopf, 1995), Remaking the World (Knopf, 1997), Invention by Design

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The Engineer of 2020: Visions of Engineering in the New Century (Harvard University Press, 1998), The Book on the Bookshelf (Knopf, 1999), and Paperboy (Knopf, 2002), a memoir about the influences that led him to become an engineer. In addition to having published the usual technical articles in the refereed journals of applied mechanics, Petroski has published numerous articles and essays in newspapers and magazines, including the New York Times, Washington Post, and Wall Street Journal. Since 1991 he has written the engineering column in the bimonthly magazine American Scientist and since 2000 has written a column on the engineering profession for ASEE Prism. He lectures regularly in the United States and abroad and has been interviewed frequently on radio and television. Petroski is a professional engineer registered in Texas. He has been a Guggenheim fellow, a National Endowment for the Humanities fellow, and a National Humanities Center fellow. Among his other honors are the Ralph Coats Roe Medal from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers; the Civil Engineering History and Heritage Award from the American Society of Civil Engineers; honorary degrees from Clarkson University, Trinity College (Hartford, Conn.), and Valparaiso University; and distinguished engineering alumnus awards from Manhattan College and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers and the Institution of Engineers of Ireland, an honorary member of the Moles, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. SUE V. ROSSER has served as dean of Ivan Allen College, the liberal arts college at Georgia Tech, where she is also a professor of history, technology, and society, since July 1999. From July 1995 to July 1999, Dr. Rosser served as professor of anthropology at the University of Florida. She also directed the Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research. From July 1994 to December 1995 she was senior program officer for women’s programs at the National Science Foundation. From 1986 to 1995 she served as director of women’s studies at the University of South Carolina, where she also was a professor of family and preventive medicine at the medical school. Dr. Rosser has researched and published extensively on topics related to women in science fields. Her most recent book is Re-Engineering Female Friendly Science (Teachers College Press, 1997). She currently serves on the editorial boards of the National Women’s Studies Association Journal and Women’s Studies Quarterly. Dr. Rosser received her undergraduate, master’s, and doctoral degrees in zoology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

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The Engineer of 2020: Visions of Engineering in the New Century ERNEST T. SMERDON, after three years as senior education associate at the National Science Foundation, is dean emeritus at the University of Arizona. He was vice provost and dean of the College of Engineering there from 1988 to 1998. Earlier he held the Janet S. Cockrell Centennial Chair in the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin and prior to that the Bess Harris Jones Centennial Professorship in Natural Resource Policy Studies at the LBJ School of Public Affairs. From 1976 until 1982 he was vice chancellor for academic affairs for the University of Texas system. Dr. Smerdon has been president of the American Society for Engineering Education and chair of its Engineering Deans Council. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in 1986. He has served on seven NAE committees including as chair of its Committee on Career-Long Education for Engineers, as a member of its Academic Advisory Board, and the Committee on the Technology Policy Options in a Global Economy. He has served on 11 National Research Council committees and chaired two. He was a board member of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology and represented the board on the Engineering Accreditation Commission. He received the highest honor of the American Society of Civil Engineers when he was elected an honorary member in 1994. Other society honors include awards from the American Society of Civil Engineers, the American Society of Agricultural Engineers, and the American Water Resources Association. His alma mater, the University of Missouri, Columbia, chose him for the Honor Award for Distinguished Service in Engineering and in December 2003 awarded him an honorary degree, doctor of science, honoris causa. He was program cochair for an international colloquium on engineering education in Berlin sponsored by the American Society for Engineering Education, the European Society for Engineering Education, and the Berlin Technical University. He has written widely on engineering education and has spoken on the subject in 12 countries outside the United States. He now spends most of his time on engineering education issues. PROJECT LIAISON STEPHEN W. DIRECTOR is Robert J. Vlasic Dean of Engineering and professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of Michigan. He received a B.S. degree from the State Uni-

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The Engineer of 2020: Visions of Engineering in the New Century versity of New York at Stony Brook in 1965 and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1967 and 1968, respectively. From 1968 until 1977 he was with the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of Florida, Gainesville. He joined Carnegie Mellon University in 1977, where he was Helen Whitaker University Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, head of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering from 1982 to 1991, and then dean of the College of Engineering until June 1996. Dr. Director is a pioneer in the area of computer-aided design and has a long record of commitment to and innovation in engineering education, including authoring pioneering textbooks and motivating and implementing new and innovative electrical and computer engineering curricula. He has published over 150 papers and authored or coauthored six texts. He currently serves as chair of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) Committee on Engineering Education and as chair of the Board of Directors of the American Society for Engineering Education Engineering Deans Council. He chaired the former NAE Academic Advisory Board. He also serves on numerous other boards and committees and as a consultant to industry and academia. Dr. Director has received many awards for his research and educational contributions, including the 1998 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Education Medal and the 1999 Distinguished Engineering Alumnus Award from the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Director is a fellow of the IEEE and a member of the NAE.

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