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C Biographies of Speakers WELCOME AND OPENING REMARKS Samuel W. Bodman is the Deputy Secretary of the Department of Commerce. A financier and executive by trade, he is well suited to his role of managing the day-to-day operations of the department, which has 40,000 employees and a $5 billion budget. Dr. Bodman is an engineer by training; he is well qualified for his specific oversight focus on the NOAA, the Patent and Trademark Office, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. With 31 years of experience in the private sector, Dr. Bodman is a firm believer in the American free enterprise system. His work in the finance industry began when he was a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and started consulting with the venture capital sector. He and his partners and associates provided financial and managerial support to scores of new business enterprises throughout the United States. Virtually all of these companies had a strong dependence on technology and innovation. Many achieved great financial success and established public markets for their securities. Dr. Bodman holds a B.S. in chemical engineering from Cornell University and an Sc.D. from MIT. He served as an associate professor of chemical engineering at MIT and as technical director of the American Research and Development Corporation, a pioneer venture capital firm. From there, Dr. Bodman went to Fidelity Venture Associates, a division of Fidelity Investments. In 1983 he was named president and chief operating officer of Fidelity Investments and a director of the Fidelity Group of Mutual Funds. In 1987, he joined Cabot Corporation, a Boston-based Fortune 300 company with global business activities in specialty chemicals and materials, where he served as chairman, CEO, and a director. Over the years, he has been a director of many other publicly owned corporations. Dr. Bodman has also been active in public service. He is a former director of MIT's School of Engineering Practice and a former member of the MIT Commission on Education. He was also a member of the Executive and Investment Committees at MIT and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and was a trustee of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum and the New England Aquarium. Charles N. Brownstein is the director of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB) of the National Academies. He joined the Academies in 2004 from the Corporation for National Research Initiatives (CNRI), where since 1994 he directed the Cross Industry Working Team and did independent research with support from NSF and DARPA. His interests are in innovation, applications and impacts of information technology, Internet performance, and the technology-policy interface. Dr. Brownstein joined CNRI in 1994 after a 20 year career at the National Science Foundation (NSF). There he served in positions including program director for Telecommunications Policy and IT Applications, division 24

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BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS 25 director for Information Science and Technology, deputy assistant director and assistant director of NSF for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE), and director of the Office of Planning and Assessment. His federal achievements are recognized by Presidential Meritorious and Distinguished Senior Executive Service awards and by NSF's Distinguished Service Award. At NSF, he led in the creation of CISE, nurtured the development of NSFnet, and set strategic directions for federal information infrastructure. He was a principal in organizing the inter-agency High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) initiative and was executive director of the National Science Board's Special Committee on the Future of NSF. He presided over information technology and policy working groups at the OECD, was founding chair of the Federal Networking Council, and participated on the Board of Regents of the National Library of Medicine. He organized and co-chaired the White House National Performance Review Working Group for Reinventing Government through Information Technology. He was a founding trustee of the Internet Society (ISOC), chaired the Association for Computing Machinery's public policy activity, USACM, and is presently a director of Fortec, which provides the IETF Secretariat. From 1971 to 1975, Dr. Brownstein taught at Lehigh University and was a founder of the Institute of Social and Behavioral Research. There he was principal investigator on NSF and industry- supported research awards on telecommunications policy, information industry innovation, two-way cable field experimentation, and interactive learning technologies. He also taught research design at the University of Michigan's Inter-university Consortium for Social and Political Research. His Ph.D. is in political science, from Florida State University, 1971. SESSION 1A: FEDERAL SPECTRUM USERS: DEFENSE, JUSTICE, TRANSPORTATION, AND AVIATION David G. Boyd is deputy director and research and development director for the SAFECOM Program Office at the Department of Homeland Security, where he has been since it was established in March 2003. He is responsible for office operations and for the management or oversight of the operations of all the Homeland Security laboratories. In addition, he is responsible for the national effort to achieve interoperability among communications systems of the nation's first responders at local, state, and federal levels. Dr. Boyd came to Homeland Security from the U.S. Department of Justice, where he was director of science and technology for the National Institute of Justice, the criminal justice research and evaluation agency. His office managed research and development programs in every facet of technology affecting law enforcement and corrections, including the forensic sciences, less-than-lethal technologies, information and communications technologies, concealed weapons and contraband detection, and simulation. His office directed the DNA and forensic laboratory improvement programs, which are designed to strengthen DNA identification and general forensic analysis capabilities in state and local crime laboratories. His office also managed the only voluntary standards development and testing organization for law enforcement and corrections in the United States, and was charged by Congress with the development of proficiency tests for DNA laboratories. Dr. Boyd also served, at the direction of the Attorney General, on the White House National Science and Technology Council, on the National Security Council Committee on Safety and Security of Public Facilities, and as the executive chair of the Justice Department's Technology Policy Council. He has an M.A. in operations research and public policy analysis and a Ph.D. in decision sciences. Tyler Duvall is the deputy assistant secretary for transportation policy in the Department of Transportation. His portfolio includes economic and strategic analysis; transportation, energy, and the environment; and federal civilian uses of the electromagnetic spectrum, including global positioning systems. Mr. Duvall currently works closely with the assistant secretary for transportation policy and the administrators of the Federal Highway and Federal Transit Administrations in the development of comprehensive surface transportation legislation. In addition, he coordinates the department's

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26 SUMMARY OF A FORUM ON SPECTRUM MANAGEMENT POLICY REFORM implementation of President Bush's Executive Order to streamline environmental reviews of transportation projects. Before assuming his current role, Duvall was the special assistant to the assistant secretary for transportation policy. In this role, he advised on a broad range of policy and legal issues related to surface transportation, including innovative financing of transportation infrastructure, streamlining environmental review processes, highway safety, freight and goods movement, Amtrak, security, overall program funding, and the oversight of federal funds. Prior to joining USDOT, Mr. Duvall was an associate in the business and finance group of Hogan & Hartson, LLP, of Washington, D.C. There, he represented various public and private companies in mergers, acquisitions, and securities filings. He has a B.A. in economics from Washington and Lee University and a law degree from the University of Virginia. Merri Jo Gamble is the spectrum manager for the Department of Justice. She has over 30 years experience in the spectrum management field and has served in a variety of positions within the Federal Bureau of Investigation, NTIA, and the Department of Justice. In the area of domestic spectrum management, she is currently the Department of Justice representative on the Interdepartmental Radio Advisory Committee. She has also served as the Department of Justice representative on the Spectrum Planning Subcommittee and on various spectrum management ad hoc and working groups. Her international experience includes participation in bilateral spectrum negotiations with the Mexican government as a subject matter expert on land mobile law enforcement border issues. She participates in activities of the International Telecommunication Union and was recently a delegate and U.S. spokesperson at the World Radiocommunication Conference 2003. Donald Willis is a manager in the Spectrum Planning and International Division Office at the Federal Aviation Administration. His strategic vision is to protect the aeronautical radio spectrum for the current and future needs of international aviation. After serving in the U.S. Navy from 1966 to 1968, Mr. Willis graduated from Western Washington University in Bellingham, Washington. In 1974, he began his career with the U.S. Air Force as a communications officer. His assignments included command of a communications squadron in Italy and liaison to the Federal Aviation Administration. Mr. Willis's assignments as a spectrum engineer began in 1978 and include having been director for frequency management for the U.S. Air Force in Europe and frequency manager for the Rapid Deployment Joint Task Force, which later became the U.S. Central Command. After retiring from the U.S. Air Force in 1992, he began his career as an electronics engineer at the FAA. Badri Younes is DOD director for spectrum management and the director of the Defense Spectrum Office, with responsibility for spectrum policy, strategic planning, and implementation at DOD. Under his leadership, the Department has successfully negotiated all the recent win-win agreements with the FCC, NTIA, and the U.S. private sector that have enabled technological innovations to proceed while safeguarding critical military equities. He has successfully led the DOD spectrum management organization to become more proactive in addressing the radio frequency (RF) and spectrum issues facing the department in transforming the military into a network-centric fighting force. Mr. Younes's experience spans over 20 years of microwave and RF systems engineering and technology. Prior to joining the DOD, he managed the RF systems engineering and spectrum management for NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Space and Ground Networks. While at GSFC, he successfully managed the development and implementation of the hardware systems for NASA's second TDRSS ground terminal. Mr. Younes's career includes 5 years of hands-on work in state-of-the-art technology at the Naval Surface Warfare Center. His primary focus included coding and modulation theory, analog and digital communications, quantum electronics, signal processing, nonlinear mathematics, and neural networks. He has an M.S. in electronic engineering from Catholic University of America.

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BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS 27 SESSION 1B: FEDERAL SPECTRUM USERS: SCIENTIFIC USES Richard Barth is chief of the Radio Frequency Management Division at the U.S. Department of Commerce and director of the department's Office of Radio Frequency Management. Scott Pace is the chief technologist for space communications in NASA's Office of Space Flight. He is responsible for advising senior NASA management on technical, programmatic, policy, and regulatory issues related to space-based information systems providing communications, navigation, and remote sensing. He is particularly focused on issues related to the global positioning system, active and passive sensor bands, aeronautical safety bands, and dual-use space communications. He represents agency interests in interagency as well as international forums. Karen St. Germain is with the NPOESS Integrated Program Office at NOAA. Her work has focused on passive polarimetric radiometry of the ocean surface and polar regions, which she continued after several years with the Naval Research Laboratory's Remote Sensing Division. Prior to this Dr. St. Germain was an assistant professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. She is a member of the American Geophysical Union, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. She has a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. SESSION 2: STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT USERS Thera Bradshaw is the chief executive officer for the City of Los Angeles Information Technology Agency. Her responsibilities are both internal and external services, including the administration of cable franchises, the education and government television stations, and the 3-1-1 number, "one call to city hall." Before joining the Los Angeles agency, Ms. Bradshaw was executive director of the city and county of San Francisco's Emergency Communications Department. Under her leadership, a new department was created and built from what was traditionally a support service function within the police, public health, and fire departments. From 1990 to 2000, she was responsible for implementing the $200 million dollar capital project improving 9-1-1 emergency communications in San Francisco. Ms. Bradshaw also served as executive director of the Regional Communications Agency of Clark County, Washington, with 42 participating local governments. She pioneered Oregon's first automated, enhanced 9-1-1 system with 14 participating local governments in the Portland metropolitan area in 1986. Ms. Bradshaw's professional leadership extends to state, national, and international roles in appointed and elected positions on a variety of boards and committees. She has authored numerous publications, is an in-demand public speaker, and testified before the U.S. Congress and the FCC. Ms. Bradshaw served from 1999 to 2003 on the Board of Officers and was the 69th President of the Association of Public-Safety Communications Officials International (APCO). APCO is the world's oldest and largest not-for-profit professional organization dedicated to the enhancement of public safety communications, with more than 16,000 members in 34 countries. She also served 7 years on the board of officers for the National 9-1-1 Association (NENA) and was the national president in 1995. Major national policy improving 9-1-1 and public safety communications was accomplished during her tenure. Ms. Bradshaw has received numerous honors, including being named one of the top women of leadership in public safety. Her undergraduate education is from Oregon State University. She is also a graduate of the University of Washington's Graduate School of Public Affairs and the FBI Executive Command College. Thomas Cowper, associate director in charge of engineering and technology for the Statewide Wireless Network project within New York State's Office for Technology, is a 20-year veteran of the New York State Police. He spent 9 years in field assignments, including 4 years with the State Police tactical unit,

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28 SUMMARY OF A FORUM ON SPECTRUM MANAGEMENT POLICY REFORM before becoming directly involved with the development, procurement, and deployment of law enforcement technology. He served as director of communications for the State Police prior to his current assignment. When completed, the Statewide Wireless Network is intended to serve the land mobile radio requirements of 65,000 federal, state, and local public safety users on a single shared network and will be the largest technology procurement in the history of New York State. Capt. Cowper is a member of the Society of Police Futurists International and the FBI's Futures Working Group, two organizations devoted to examining the emerging trends and developments that are changing our world and the manner in which law enforcement and public safety services are delivered. He holds a B.S. in mechanical engineering technology and an M.A. in public administration. Nancy Jesuale is the president of NetCity Engineering, Inc., a consulting practice dedicated to strategic planning and solution sets for government in public safety and fiber optic telecommunications systems. Current clients of NCE include the City of Los Angeles, the District of Columbia, Portland Community College, and the Center for Wireless Network Security. Ms. Jesuale has worked in local and state government as a telecommunications strategic planner and director of public safety networks, telecommunications networking, and network operations. As program manager for public safety, she is responsible for establishing relationships, research programs, and public policy support for the Wireless Network Security Center (WiNSeC). Most recently Ms. Jesuale was the director of ComNet, a bureau of the city of Portland, Oregon, responsible for all voice, data, and video communications systems in the city and provider of regional communications services for government entities throughout the region. Robert LeGrande is the deputy chief technology officer in the Office of the Chief Technology Officer (OCTO), District of Columbia government (DC). Mr. LeGrande provides executive leadership for the Wireless Networks Program, the Human Services Modernization Program, the Agency Liaison Group, and the OCTO Chief Information Officer staff. The Wireless Networks Program provides upgrades to the push-to-talk radio networks of the DC Fire Department, the DC Emergency Management System, and the DC Metropolitan Police Department (MPD). He also manages, in conjunction with Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA), the WMATA Public Radio System Program. This program will expand the upgraded DC Fire, EMS, and MPD push-to-talk radio system to the WMATA tunnel system radio network. Mr. LeGrande oversees the Public Safety Wireless High Speed Data Network Program as well. The program's objective is to construct a broadband wireless network using licensed dedicated spectrum to provide citywide access to mission-critical applications. In this effort, he spearheaded the creation of the Spectrum Coalition for Public Safety to secure 10 MHz of spectrum in the 700 MHz band. He and his team are actively working with legislators to achieve this goal. Additionally, his team is creating the first broadband wireless network for public safety. The network will serve as a testbed for public safety applications and provide all public safety agencies with the insight to key requirements and operational issues regarding broadband applications. He leads the Human Services Modernization Program team, which will upgrade some DC human services IT applications and integrate all of them. He also heads the Agency Liaison Group, which provides IT program direction and support to all district agencies and reviews and approves all DC IT project purchases. Finally, Mr. LeGrande is the deputy responsible for OCTO chief information officer (CIO) staff. This program is responsible for providing CIO leadership and direction to multiple district agencies. Prior to Mr. LeGrande's position with the DC government, he was responsible for overseeing all development of products within the NuVizion portfolio. At Proxicom he served as the managing director for the National Microsoft Practice, with executive oversight responsibilities for a diverse set of program engagements such as www.exxonmobil.com, www.MBCC.com, www.AEAnet.org and www.MERANT.com. Prior to Proxicom, Mr. LeGrande worked as a consultant program manager for MCI's Internet and Intranet Development Group. Here he managed over 18 Web-based projects, including www.MCICENTER.com and MCI's award-winning investor relations Web site. He began his career with Lockheed Martin, where he held positions in configuration management software test and integration engineering and project management on the AN/BSY Submarine Combat System and Vertical Launching System programs. Mr.

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BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS 29 LeGrande received his education at Clark Atlanta University, where he graduated with a B.S. in physics and a minor in mathematics. Glen Nash is senior telecommunications engineer in the State of California Department of General Services. Marilyn Praisner is the longest serving woman ever on the Montgomery County Council. She is currently in her fourth term representing District 4. Ms. Praisner served as council president in 1993 and 1997 and as vice president in 1992 and 1996. Prior to being elected to the County Council, she worked for the Central Intelligence Agency for 16 years, serving as an analyst, a branch chief, and on the staff of the Deputy Director of Intelligence. A county official known for her national leadership on technology and telecommunications issues, Ms. Praisner has represented local government across this country at numerous technology conferences on public safety communications, cable television, the siting of cellular towers, and rights-of-way management. She has represented local government on public safety communications committees, including the National Task Force on Interoperability (as vice chair of the Governance Subcommittee) and the Department of Homeland Security's Executive Committee for the Public Safety Wireless Network (PSWN) program. She currently serves as a member of the Department's SAFECOM Executive Committee. She also serves on the Homeland Security Task Force of the National Association of Counties (NACo). Ms. Praisner is a Maryland vice chair for Capital Wireless Integrated Network (CapWIN), a public safety communication system for the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. A member of the board of directors of the NACo, she is in her second term as chair of its Telecommunications and Technology Steering Committee. The immediate past president of the Maryland Association of Counties, she also serves on the Maryland Interoperability Governance Working Group. SESSION 3: FEDERAL SPECTRUM MANAGEMENT AUTHORITIES Michael Gallagher is the Acting Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Communications and Information and Acting Administrator of NTIA. He most recently served as the deputy chief of staff for policy and as counselor to the Secretary of Commerce. He was the lead policy advisor to the Secretary and was responsible for the effective coordination of policy initiatives within the Commerce Department and across the administration. As a leading member of the Bush administration's technology team, he has focused on bringing the benefits of new telecommunications technologies to American consumers. Working closely with the FCC and other government agencies, Gallagher directed NTIA's technical study that led to the FCC's approval of ultrawideband, a new technology that could spur the development of devices to underlay the radio frequency spectrum, improving the ability of public safety entities to respond to emergencies. He led NTIA's development of a spectrum allocation plan, paving the way for deployment of advanced mobile telecommunications services known as third-generation (3G). The 3G plan, which identified 90 MHz of radio spectrum for future wireless services, is a significant part of the administration's overall initiative to promote efficient use of the radio spectrum--key to improving the quality of voice and data services and enhancing the delivery of health services. Mr. Gallagher has a B.A. from the University of California at Berkeley and a J.D. from the University of California at Los Angeles. Julius Knapp is deputy chief of the FCC's Office of Engineering and Technology (OET). Previously he was chief of the policy and rules division for OET and oversaw spectrum allocations and technical rules for radio frequency devices as well as coordination of radio frequency issues with the federal government. Knapp has also served as the chief of the FCC laboratory, where he was responsible for the FCC's equipment authorization program. He held a variety of other positions during his 26 years with the FCC, including heading the Frequency Allocations Branch, where he directed FCC frequency allocation

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30 SUMMARY OF A FORUM ON SPECTRUM MANAGEMENT POLICY REFORM proceedings for cellular service, private land mobile services, and mobile satellite services. He is a member of the Institute of Electronics and Electrical Engineers and the Electromagnetic Compatibility Society and is a fellow of the Radio Club of America. Mr. Knapp has a B.S. in electrical engineering from the City College of New York. John Muleta is chief of the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau (WTB) of the Federal Communications Commission, appointed in January 2003. Prior to this appointment, he was the president and CEO of Source 1 Technologies LLC, a privately held systems integration firm in Washington, D.C. Mr. Muleta was also a cofounder of OI Systems, Inc., a Washington-based management consulting firm. He previously served at the FCC, where he held various positions, including deputy bureau chief and chief of the Enforcement Division of the Common Carrier Bureau. After leaving the FCC, Mr. Muleta held the position of president for PSINet Ventures, Inc., and before that, was president of PSINet's Global Facilities Division and the India, Middle East, and Africa Division. He began his career at GTE Corporation and later worked at Coopers & Lybrand Consulting, LLC, before joining the FCC. Mr. Muleta has a B.S. in systems engineering from the University of Virginia School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, and M.B.A. and J.D degrees from the University of Virginia joint degree program. Andrea Petro is a program examiner at the Office of Management and Budget. David Siddall is an attorney with the law firm Paul, Hastings, Janofsky, and Walker LLP in Washington, D.C. Mr. Siddall advises and represents a wide range of clients on wireless spectrum and equipment issues before the FCC, Congress, and executive branch agencies. He brings to the table many years of communications policy experience on Capitol Hill and at the FCC before entering private practice, including service as chief of the FCC's spectrum management branch and later as wireless advisor to an FCC commissioner. He was at the heart of the policy debates in the 1990s, when the FCC allocated spectrum and adopted rules to govern a variety of new services such as PCS, digital TV, satellite digital audio radio, and low Earth orbit satellites. Mr. Siddall is admitted to practice before the bars of the District of Columbia and the U.S. Supreme Court. He also is an active member of the Federal Communications Bar Association and the American Bar Association. He is coauthor of the book FCC Lobbying--A Handbook of Insider Tips and Practical Advice. SESSION 4: FREQUENCY MANAGERS AND AMATEUR RADIO Robert Gurss serves as director of legal and government affairs for the Association of Public-Safety Communications Officials International (APCO). His experience covers all aspects of communications law, including issues related to wireless telecommunications, common carrier, cable, and broadcasting matters. His practice currently focuses on the representation of governmental entities and corporations on wireless telecommunications issues. His expertise includes domestic and international spectrum allocations, transactions involving communications facilities, frequency reallocation negotiations, resolution of interference disputes, complex FCC licensing matters, regulatory compliance issues, rule waivers, equipment standards, tower siting and related environmental assessment issues. Mr. Gurss has been an active participant in the Public Safety Wireless Advisory Committee, the Public Safety National Coordination Committee, the National Public Safety Telecommunications Council, and the National Task Force on Interoperability. He is a frequent speaker on communications law issues and has written the monthly "Washington View" column in Public Safety Communications magazine for the past 14 years. Mr. Gurss is a director and past president of the Land Mobile Communications Council, a coalition of major associations representing the interests of wireless telecommunications licensees before the FCC. He has a B.A. and a J.D. from the University of Michigan.

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BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS 31 William Moroney is the president, chief executive officer, and member of the board of directors of the United Telecom Council (UTC) and the United Power Line Council (UPLC). UTC is the international trade association representing the telecommunications and IT interests of electric, gas, and water utilities and other critical infrastructure entities. UPLC is a trade association of utilities and technology companies involved in the deployment of broadband over power line (BPL) services. Mr. Moroney has spent the last 20 years as the leader of industry organizations driving technological change and convergence in networking and electronic commerce. Before joining UTC, he served as the chief executive of the MultiMedia Telecommunications Association (MMTA), the Business Quality Messaging Forum (BQM Forum), the Electronic Messaging Association (EMA), the Electronic Funds Transfer Association (EFTA), the National Automated Clearing House Association (NACHA), and his own consulting and financial newsletter publishing company. He also has held public affairs and marketing positions at other trade associations and worked on two presidential campaigns and as a broadcast journalist. Mr. Moroney is a member of the board of directors of the research foundation of the Consumer Energy Council. Paul Rinaldo is the chief technology officer for the American Radio Relay League, the national association for amateur radio. His current duties include U.S. government relations on domestic and international matters, including the International Telecommunication Union (ITU). He has participated in ITU plenipotentiary conferences, world radio conferences, study groups, working parties, and task groups and in related U.S. preparatory meetings. He currently chairs the ITU-R group charged with technical studies related to the amateur and amateur-satellite services. He chaired ITU groups on wind profiler radar and out-of-band emissions. He is a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and a member of the Board of the United States ITU Association. Mr. Rinaldo studied radio engineering at Valparaiso Technical Institute. Kenneth Ryan is director of Spectrum Management Solutions for Comsearch. He is responsible for fixed, satellite, and emerging wireless technologies in engineering, business development, and spectrum management. He is currently working on projects involving federal government wireless initiatives, domestic and international specialized spectrum management services, and emerging wireless services such as Dedicated Short-Range Communications, Enhanced Safety of Vehicles, and satellite Ka-band systems. He is active in the Telecommunications Industry Association and National Spectrum Managers Association. He is a member of the NSMA board of directors and is chairperson for the Satellite Technologies Working Group. He has been working with intersystem interference assessment, satellite Earth station system design, and regulatory consulting for two decades. Mr. Ryan is a professional engineer registered in the state of Virginia. He has a B.S. in electrical engineering from George Mason University and an M.S. in electrical engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute. SESSION 5: CONSUMER ORGANIZATIONS Mark Cooper is director of research at the Consumer Federation of America, where he has responsibility for energy, telecommunications, and economic policy analysis. He is also director of the Digital Society Project, a Ford Foundation-funded effort to analyze and explain the impact of ongoing technological changes in American society to consumer, low income, and civil rights activists and organizations. He has published in trade and scholarly journals numerous articles on telecommunications and digital society issues, as well as antitrust and energy policy. Dr. Cooper was also a fellow at the Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society and an associate fellow at the Columbia University Institute on Tele- Information. He is the author of four books, including Media Ownership and Democracy in the Digital Information Age: Promoting Diversity with First Amendment Principles and Market Structure Analysis (Center for Internet and Society, 2003). Dr. Cooper has a Ph.D. from Yale University.

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32 SUMMARY OF A FORUM ON SPECTRUM MANAGEMENT POLICY REFORM Harold Feld, associate director of the Media Access Project, joined MAP after practicing communications, Internet, and energy law at Covington & Burling. He served as co-chair of the Federal Communications Bar Association's Online Committee and has written numerous articles on Internet law and communications policy for trade publications and legal journals. In addition, Mr. Feld clerked for the Hon. John M. Ferren of the District of Columbia Court of Appeals. He has a B.S. from Princeton University and a J.D. from Boston University Law School. SESSION 6A: CARRIERS Jim Bugel, executive director for Federal Government Affairs/National Security for Cingular Wireless LLC, is responsible for federal regulatory policy and strategic planning for Cingular Wireless. Mr. Bugel brings to the federal regulatory environment years of experience in the wireless industry. He has held management and leadership positions in the operations, marketing, and finance sectors of the company. In Washington, D.C., Mr. Bugel is actively involved in federal spectrum management issues at both the Federal Communications Commission and National Telecommunications and Information Administration. His added responsibilities include the newly created Department of Homeland Security, where he is Cingular's representative on matters relating to homeland security. Prior to the formation of Cingular Wireless, Mr. Bugel was with BellSouth. Mr. Bugel received his Bachelors in Business Science from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. Diane Cornell is vice president for regulatory policy at the Cellular Telecommunications & Internet Association (CTIA). She is responsible for coordinating regulatory issues affecting the mobile wireless industry. Since joining CTIA Ms. Cornell has worked on a wide range of issues involving spectrum, universal service, and regulatory mandates. She previously worked at the FCC in a number of positions. Her last position at the FCC was as associate chief in the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau, where she served as chief of staff. There she was involved in a wide range of wireless communications issues, including various spectrum-related rulemakings and issues involving third-generation mobile systems. As chief of the Telecommunications Division of the International Bureau and chief of the International Policy Division of the Common Carrier Bureau, she was responsible for international policy rulemakings, facilities and service authorizations, and multilateral and bilateral conferences. Before joining the FCC, Ms. Cornell was a senior associate specializing in telecommunications with the law firm of Squire, Sanders and Dempsey in Washington, D.C. She is currently an officer of the Federal Communications Bar Association. Ms. Cornell has a B.A. from Wesleyan University and a J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. Jim Smoak, director of business development, Verizon Wireless, has been in the wireless industry for over 10 years. He has held several positions in sales, training, customer service, engineering, and product development. Mr. Smoak currently works in the wireless data and multimedia department and is a director within the business development function. Some of his larger responsibilities include the company's efforts around location-based services and smart devices, and he is responsible for the company's marketing relationship with Microsoft Corporation. SESSION 6B: BROADCASTING SERVICES David Donovan is president of the Association for Maximum Service Television, Inc. (MSTV). MSTV is a 48-year old national association of over 430 local television stations dedicated to promoting the

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BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS 33 technical quality of free, local, over-the-air television service and has taken a leading role in the transition to digital television service. Mr. Donovan has nearly 20 years of broadcast regulatory and policy experience, and prior to accepting the position of MSTV president, he served as the vice president for legal and legislative affairs for the Association of Local Television Stations, Inc. (ALTV). He has also served as the mass media legal advisor to two FCC commissioners, as well as legal advisor to the chief of the Mass Media Bureau. Mr. Donovan came to the FCC from Boston, where he was in the private practice of law. He also served as law clerk to the Judicial Council of Massachusetts. He has a B.A. and an M.A. in communications from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and a J.D. from Suffolk University Law School. Kalpak Gude is vice president for government regulatory affairs and associate general counsel of PanAmSat. PanAmSat is a leading commercial provider of global satellite communications services in both video (including cable television program distribution, direct-to-home television, and special events coverage) and data (including VSAT networks and Internet backbone connectivity). His responsibilities include leading the corporate effort on global and domestic regulatory affairs, which entail management of PanAmSat's international market entry, global licensing, and international policy efforts, along with legislative, regulatory policy, and licensing issues before the U.S. government. His work also focuses on corporate compliance with U.S. export control regulations and international spectrum management issues. These responsibilities include management of PanAmSat's regulatory efforts at the ITU and global compliance with ITU regulations. Mr. Gude worked as counsel on the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, as well as the Subcommittee on Communications before joining PanAmSat. There, he focused on areas of telecommunications, the Internet, and satellites. Prior to his work with the U.S. Senate, he was an attorney/advisor in the Policy and Program Planning Division, Common Carrier Bureau of the FCC, where he focused on local telecommunications competition and was one of the primary authors of the FCC's local competition rules implementing the 1996 Telecommunications Act. Mr. Gude has a B.S. in electrical engineering from the Rochester Institute of Technology and a J.D. from the Indiana University School of Law, Bloomington. Greg Schmidt is vice president for new development and general counsel of LIN Television Corporation, where he oversees legal and regulatory operations. Mr. Schmidt came to LINTV from his partnership in the Washington law firm of Covington & Burling, where he practiced communications law for 15 years. At C&B, he represented a wide variety of mid-sized broadcast companies, including LINTV, as well as television trade associations, including the CBS Television Network Affiliates Association and the Association for Maximum Service Television (MSTV). While representing MSTV, Mr. Schmidt helped craft the industry's initial regulatory strategy for the transition to digital television. As interim co- president of MSTV, he assisted in the completion of the industry's reevaluation of its digital transmission standard. He is currently on the boards of the Media Institute and the Washington International School and has served on the executive committee and as chairman of various committees of the Federal Communications Bar Association. Prior to his work with C&B, he served as a clerk and as deputy supervising staff attorney for the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. He has a B.A. from Swarthmore College and a J.D. from Stanford University. SESSION 6C: COMMERCIAL AND GOVERNMENT SERVICES AND APPLICATIONS Bruce Fette is chief scientist of the ISSPD division of General Dynamics Decision Systems, working in advanced signal processing for telephony and RF communications. Dr. Fette has acquired 35 patents, is a member of the Motorola Science Advisory Board, a Motorola Dan Nobel fellow, and has been given the Distinguished Innovator Award. He has worked with the SDR Forum from its inception, currently as technical chair, and is a panelist for the IEEE Conference on Acoustics Speech and Signal Processing

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34 SUMMARY OF A FORUM ON SPECTRUM MANAGEMENT POLICY REFORM Industrial Technology Track. Dr. Fette also is currently heading the General Dynamics Signal Processing Center of Excellence. He has a B.S.E.E. from the University of Cincinnati and M.S.E.E. and Ph.D. degrees from Arizona State University. Pat Mahoney is the vice president for regulatory and spectrum affairs for Iridium Satellite LLC, the owner and operator of the Iridium Mobile Satellite System. In this position, she is responsible for the coordination of spectrum and regulatory issues impacting the Iridium satellite system, as well as the management of spectrum and service authorizations necessary for operation in various countries in which Iridium provides service. Mahoney has over 24 years experience as an attorney in the communications field, specializing in regulatory matters, licensing, and spectrum, including 5 years at Iridium LLC, the predecessor of Iridium Satellite, LLC. Immediately prior to joining Iridium Satellite LLC, she was vice president at Final Analysis, one of the licensed "Little LEO" MSS systems, establishing and directing the domestic and international regulatory policies and government affairs activities of that company. Ms. Mahoney began her communications regulatory career at the communications law firm of Fletcher Heald and Hildreth, where she practiced for 16 years and was a partner. She has also served the satellite industry in a number of leadership positions. She is a former chair of the Satellite Industry Association, an industry trade association in the United States. She served on the FCC Advisory Committee for the ITU's 2003 World Radio Conference and was vice chair of the its Informal Working Group on MSS, including GPS. She was also one of three U.S. satellite industry representatives on an international task force of leaders of government, industry, and the science community established by the OECD to address the impact of low Earth orbit satellites on the future of radio astronomy. Thomas Walsh is with Boeing Space and Communication Spectrum Management. Jennifer Warren is senior director of Trade and Regulatory Affairs in Lockheed Martin's Washington, D.C., operations, responsible for developing and implementing corporate domestic and international policy and regulatory strategies, with a particular emphasis on spectrum management, IT policy/regulation, and satellite policies. In addition, she handles day-to-day government and regulatory responsibilities associated with these issues. Prior to joining Lockheed Martin's Space and Strategic Missiles Sector, Ms. Warren was at the FCC in numerous positions, including senior legal advisor to the chief of the International Bureau and, finally, assistant chief of the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau. Before joining the FCC, she interned at the Commission of the European Communities in Brussels, at both legal services and the Directorate General for Competition, focusing on a range of EU activities with Japan and the United States, including the U.S.-EU cooperation agreement on antitrust matters. Since entering the field of international telecommunications, Ms. Warren has served both as a government and private representative on U.S. delegations to numerous international conferences, including the ITU Plenipotentiary Conferences and World Radio Conferences. She also served as vice chair of the FCC's Federal Advisory Committee for WRC-03 (WAC-03) and currently is vice chair of the TIA's Spectrum Policy Working Group, co-chair of the Satellite Industry Association's Regulatory Working Group, and chair of Industry Working Group-1 of the FCC's WAC-07. Ms. Warren has a B.S. in languages and a J.D., both from Georgetown University. SESSION 7: TECHNOLOGY, STANDARDS, AND COMMERCIAL R&D Kevin Kahn is an Intel senior fellow and currently the director of the Communications Technology Lab, an advanced development and research lab in Intel's Corporate Technology Group responsible for radio, optical, and copper physical layer technologies. He helps drive communications strategies and policy for the corporation. Some of his current primary focuses are broadband access to the home, wireless LANs and PANs, spectrum policy, and related Internet issues. He also coordinates Intel RF technical directions across divisions and chairs the Intel Communications Research Council, which oversees research activities between Intel and academic programs. Dr. Kahn serves on the FCC Technological Advisory Council, the National Science Foundation's Engineering Advisory Council, and on various academic

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BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS 35 advisory committees. Throughout his work with Intel, he has worked in system software development, operating systems, processor architecture, and various strategic planning roles. He has held both management and senior individual contributor roles. Dr. Kahn holds a B.Sc. in mathematics from Manhattan College and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in computer science from Purdue University. Carl Panasik is director of the advanced architectures team for Texas Instruments (TI) and is also currently a distinguished member of technical staff. He is responsible for U.S.-based research initiatives in the Wireless Terminals Business Unit and is chair of the Wireless Intellectual Property Rights Committee. The team develops wireless communications systems utilizing smart handsets. Dr. Panasik is TI's early adopter for ultrawideband communications. He has worked on software-defined radio architectures and digital signal processor-enhanced cellular power amplifiers that are designed for next- generation handsets. Prior to his current position, Dr. Panasik was program manager for the TI Odyssey Program, where he directed technology development for 2.5 and 3G Internet-ready handsets that will allow consumers to view streaming audio and video. This research effort covered adaptive antennas, multiband RF, baseband architecture, process technology, applications software, and other areas. Previously, Dr. Panasik was the manager for the Wireless Data Research program, where he supported the TI Notebook division in the development of wireless meeting rooms and classrooms. He also was the program manager for the TI programmable transversal filter research contract for the U.S. Department of Defense. Dr. Panasik is a senior member of the IEEE and a certified professional engineer in the state of Texas. He holds 13 patents with over 30 patents pending. Dr. Pansik has a B.S. in electrical engineering from Cleveland State University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Illinois. George (Gee) Rittenhouse is vice president of the Wireless Research Laboratories at Lucent Technologies, where he has headed several projects, including MIMO system development, network optimization, wireless IP networks, and fourth-generation wireless. He joined Bell Laboratories as a member of technical staff, where he developed a high-speed 0.1 m NMOS process for optical networking. He later joined the Wireless Research Laboratory at Bell Laboratories, where his research focused on RF front-end radio architectures and cellular system engineering. He has written for numerous publications and holds patents in wireless systems and circuits. He has also received the Bell Labs fellow award. Dr. Rittenhouse holds a B.S. in physics from the University of California at Los Angeles and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Carl Stevenson is senior manager for standards and regulatory affairs at Agere Systems, with experience in the design and development of RF communications systems and equipment. He is a senior member of the IEEE, a member of the IEEE Standards Association, a fellow of the Radio Club of America, chair of the IEEE 802.18 Radio Regulatory Technical Advisory Group, and chair of the Wi-Fi Alliance Regulatory Committee. Charles Wheatley is senior vice president for technology at Qualcomm, concentrating equally on RF hardware design, system design, field testing, and standards development. He has been working on various aspects of CDMA as applied to cellular/personal communications since its inception. He has been involved with spread spectrum systems for over 40 years, including both frequency hopping and direct sequence systems. At Rockwell International, he contributed to the GPS on various terminal designs and was also responsible for technical aspects of GPS's spaceborne rubidium frequency standard. After he moved to Linkabit, he contributed to RF and system aspects of the Milstar program. Dr. Wheatley is an IEEE fellow and holds over 50 patents on various techniques and devices, mostly related to communications and navigation. He holds a B.S. in physics from the California Institute of Technology, an M.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Southern California, and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of California at Los Angeles.

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36 SUMMARY OF A FORUM ON SPECTRUM MANAGEMENT POLICY REFORM SESSION 8: WI-FI AND BROADBAND WIRELESS ACCESS TECHNOLOGIES Siavash Alamouti is vice president for advanced development at Vivato, where he has been a pioneer in wireless technologies. Best known as the inventor of the Alamouti Code, the first multiple-input- multiple-output (MIMO) code adopted for a wireless standard, his research and development efforts have been recognized by the IEEE Communications Society as among the most influential in the organization's history. Since joining Vivato, Mr. Alamouti has helped revolutionize the use of smart antenna technology in Wi-Fi infrastructure systems and was instrumental in building the first Wi-Fi switch. Prior to joining Vivato, he made contributions in specifying methodologies and developing design libraries for third- generation wireless communications systems, wireless local area network (WLAN) systems and smart antennae at Cadence Design Systems. Mr. Alamouti began his career developing and designing physical and media access control (MAC) layer technologies at MPR Teltech and AT&T Wireless. In addition to his professional duties, Mr. Alamouti serves as a technical advisor to both the Harvard Broadband Communications Laboratory (HBBCL) and Morpho Technologies. He has published more than 100 papers and technical reports and has received more than 10 patents for his innovations in the field of wireless communications. Mr. Alamouti holds B.A.Sc. and M.A.Sc. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of British Columbia. Duane Buddrius, director of product engineering and product management for Alvarion Inc., has been instrumental in Alvarion's extraordinary growth, contributing heavily to the development of new products for the 2.4-GHz, 5-GHz, and 900-MHz markets as well as managing the product life cycles for the North American Division. He pioneered the unlicensed band direct sequence and frequency hopping spread spectrum markets, working in systems engineering, research and development, and marketing. Mr. Buddrius has participated in IEEE 802.11 wireless standards development, FCC rule-making procedures, and in the WLANA, Wi-Fi, and WiMAX industry associations. Prior to Alvarion, Mr. Buddrius held positions as director of engineering and director of product development at Solectek Corporation and at other players in the wireless industry. Leigh Chinitz is the chief technical officer for the Wireless LAN Division of Proxim Corporation. His responsibilities include setting and leading technology directions across the Proxim LAN Division and driving the overall software and hardware architecture and technology roadmaps. In addition, his position entails participation in many technical, regulatory, and standards organizations. Previously he was the chair of the technical committee within the HomeRF Working Group, and currently he is an active participant in the 802.11 standards committees. Prior to joining Proxim he worked in systems technology research for Motorola and later was responsible for coordinating Motorola's participation in FCC rule- making proceedings as part of Motorola's government relations organization. Mr. Chintz holds a B.S. in physics from Yale University and an M.S. in physics from the University of Virginia. Michael Green, manager of Global Product Compliance at Atheros Communications, is responsible for regulatory approvals of 802.11a, b, and g products. Over the past 2 years he has lobbied spectrum regulators in the United States, Asia, and Europe to remove barriers to use of the 5-GHz bands and participated in the U.S. and European preparation for the World Radio Conference 2003, which has resulted in a global allocation of 455 MHz of spectrum for use by wireless LAN devices. He formerly worked at 3Com Corporation as manager of the regulatory affairs and approvals group responsible for global approvals of all product categories and as a wireless product manager. Dewayne Hendricks is currently CEO of the Dandin Group, Inc., based in Fremont, California. The Dandin Group offers a comprehensive range of products and services, including research and product development, for wireless communications via the Internet. The Dandin Group will begin to deploy the first exclusively wireless Internet-based communications system, including voice, data, and video, in

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BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS 37 Tonga later this year. He is also an active member of the FCC Technological Advisory Council. Prior to forming the Dandin Group, he was the general manager of the Wireless Business Unit for Com21, Inc. He joined Com21 following an opportunity to participate as the co-principal investigator in the NSF's Wireless Field Tests for Education project. The project successfully connected remote educational institutions to the Internet. The test sites ranged from rural primary schools in Colorado to a university in Ulaan Baatar, Mongolia. Mr. Hendricks was the CEO and cofounder of Tetherless Access Ltd., one of the first companies to develop and deploy Part 15 unlicensed wireless metropolitan area data networks using the TCP/IP protocols. He has participated in the installation of these networks in other parts of the world, including Kenya, Tonga, Mexico, Canada, and Mongolia. In 1986, he ported the popular KA9Q Internet Protocol package to the Macintosh, allowing the Macintosh platform to be used in packet radio networks. Today, thousands of amateur radio operators worldwide use the NET/Mac system he developed to participate in the global packet radio Internet. This system continues to be developed and deployed by the amateur radio service. He has been involved with radio since receiving his amateur radio operator's license as a teen. Mr. Hendricks currently holds official positions in several national nonprofit amateur radio organizations and is a director of the Wireless Communications Alliance, an industry group representing manufacturers in the unlicensed radio industry. Bradley Holmes is with Arraycomm, Inc. SESSION 9: GOVERNMENT AND ACADEMIC R&D Preston F. Marshall has an almost 30-year background in communications, software and hardware development, and system development. Currently he is with DARPA's Advanced Technology Office, and serves as program manager for the neXt Generation (XG) Communications, WolfPack, and Connectionless networking programs, as well as several smaller efforts. The XG program is developing technology to provide adaptive spectrum algorithms, waveforms, and media access in an integrated, open product. The WolfPack program is developing an electronic and signal intelligence/communications and radar denial system that uses a distributed network of forward-positioned, Coke-can-sized devices and networks the multiple assets to achieve order-of-magnitude increases in capability over conventional standoff technology. Mr. Marshall previously was employed by a number of defense electronics companies and participated in the Trident submarine, missile defense, B-1B electronic countermeasures and acoustic processing programs, and he has supported several Office of the Secretary of Defense offices in the area of spectrum-related policy and technology. Mr. Marshall holds B.S.E.E and M.S. degrees in information science from Lehigh University. Dipankar Raychaudhuri is a professor of electrical and computer engineering and director of the Wireless Information Network Lab (WINLAB) at Rutgers University. As WINLAB's director, he is responsible for a cooperative industry-university research center with focus on next-generation wireless technologies. WINLAB's current research scope includes topics such as RF/sensor devices, UWB, future 3G and WLAN systems, spectrum management, ad hoc networks, and pervasive computing. Prior to WINLAB, he held progressively responsible corporate R&D positions in telecom and networking, including chief scientist for Iospan Wireless, assistant general manager and department head of systems architecture for NEC USA C&C Research Laboratories, and head of broadband communications research for the Sarnoff Corporation. Research and development highlights include the multimodal sensor-on- silicon center of excellence (MUSE), hierarchical self-organizing ad hoc wireless network for sensors and 4G, and AirBurst, a MIMO/OFDM system for broadband fixed wireless access. Dr. Raychaudhuri holds 10 patents on various topics, including broadband wireless networks, MAC protocols, digital video, and VSAT networks. A past vice-chair of the Wireless ATM Working Group of the ATM Forum, he is also an IEEE fellow and editor of IEEE Multimedia and ACM M2CR. He holds a B.Tech. in electronics and

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38 SUMMARY OF A FORUM ON SPECTRUM MANAGEMENT POLICY REFORM electrical communications from the Indian Institute of Technology at Kharagpur and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from SUNY at Stony Brook. Moe Z. Win has been since 2002 with the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he holds the Charles Stark Draper Chair. His main research interests are the application of mathematical and statistical theories to communication, detection, and estimation problems. Specific current research topics include measurement and modeling of time-varying channels, design and analysis of multiple antenna systems, ultrawide bandwidth communications systems, optical communications systems, and space communications systems. From 1998 to 2002, he was with the Wireless Systems Research Department at AT&T LaboratoriesResearch. From 1994 to 1997, he was a research assistant with the Communication Sciences Institute at the University of Southern California (USC), where he played a key role in the successful creation of the Ultra-Wideband Radio Laboratory. In 1987, Dr. Win was at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology, where he performed research on digital communications and optical systems for NASA space exploration missions. He currently serves as the technical program chair for the IEEE Communication Theory Symposium of ICC-2004. He served as the technical program chair for the IEEE Communication Theory Symposium of Globecom-2000 and the IEEE Conference on Ultra Wideband Systems and Technologies in 2002, technical program vice-chair for the IEEE International Conference on Communications in 2002, and the tutorial chair for the IEEE Semiannual International Vehicular Technology Conference in fall 2001. He is the secretary for the Radio Communications Technical Committee of the IEEE Communications Society. Dr. Win currently serves as area editor for Modulation and Signal Design and as editor for Wideband Wireless and Diversity, both for IEEE Transactions on Communications. He served as the editor for Equalization and Diversity from July 1998 to June 2003 for the IEEE Transactions on Communications and as a guest editor for the 2002 IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications special issue on Ultra-Wideband Radio in Multiaccess Wireless Communications. Dr. Win was awarded a B.S. from Texas A&M University in 1987 and an M.S. degree from the University of Southern California at Los Angeles in 1989, both in electrical engineering. As a Presidential Fellow at USC, he received both an M.S. degree in applied mathematics and a Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering in 1998.