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D Biographies of Committee and Staff Members David E. Liddle, Chair, is a general partner in the firm U.S. Venture Partners, a leading Silicon Valley venture capital firm that specializes in building companies from an early stage in digital communications, networking, wireless communications, semiconductors, technical software, and e-health. He retired in December 1999 after 8 years as CEO of Interval Research Corporation. During and after his education (B.S. and E.E., University of Michigan; Ph.D., computer science, University of Toledo), Dr. Liddle has spent his professional career developing technologies for interaction and communication in activities spanning research, development, management, and entrepreneurship. First, he spent 10 years at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center and the Xerox Information Products Group, where he was responsible for the first commercial implementation of the graphical user interface and local area networking. He then founded Metaphor Computer Systems, whose technology was adopted by IBM and the company ultimately acquired by IBM in 1991. In 1992, Dr. Liddle co-founded Interval Research Corporation with Paul Allen. During his tenure, the company formed six new companies and several joint ventures based on the research conducted at Interval. Dr. Liddle is a consulting professor of computer science at Stanford University. He has served as a director at Sybase, Broderbund Software, Metricom, Starwave, and Ticketmaster; he is currently a director with the New York Times Company, in addition to numerous early-stage companies. He was honored as a distinguished alumnus from the University of Michigan and is a member of the national advisory committee at the College of Engineering of that university. He is also a member of the advisory committee of the School of Engineering at Stanford University and of the College of Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. He has been elected a senior fellow of the Royal College of Art for his contributions to human-computer interaction. His current technology and investment interests are particularly focused on signal processing, with emphasis on wireless communications. Yochai Benkler is a professor of law at Yale Law School. His research focuses on the effects of laws that regulate information production and exchange on the distribution of control over information flows, knowledge, and culture in the digital environment. His particular focus has been the neglected role of commons-based approaches toward management of resources in the digitally networked environment. He has written about the economics and political theory of rules governing telecommunications infrastructure, with a special emphasis on wireless communications, rules governing private control over information, in particular intellectual property, and of relevant aspects of U.S. constitutional law. Previously, Mr. Benkler had been a professor at New York University School of Law, where he was director of the Engelberg Center for Innovation Law and Policy and of the Information Law Institute. Mr. Benkler received his J.D from Harvard Law School and his LL.B. from Tel Aviv University. 39

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40 SUMMARY OF A FORUM ON SPECTRUM MANAGEMENT POLICY REFORM David Borth is an expert on wireless communications, with insight into national security as well as commercial needs. He is corporate vice president and director of the Communications Research Laboratories of Motorola, a part of the company's research arm, Motorola Labs. Dr. Borth joined Motorola in 1980 as a member of the Systems Research Laboratory in corporate research and development. As a member of that organization, he has conducted research on digital modulation techniques, adaptive digital signal processing methods applied to communication systems, and personal communication systems, including both cellular and PCS systems. He has contributed to Motorola's implementations of the GSM, TDMA (IS-54/IS-136), and CDMA (IS-95) digital cellular systems. In his current role, he manages a multinational (United States, Australia, France, Japan, United Kingdom) organization focusing on all aspects of communication systems, ranging from theoretical systems studies to system and subsystem analysis and implementation to integrated circuit designs. Dr. Borth received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign. Previously, he was a member of the technical staff of the systems division of Watkins- Johnson Company and an assistant professor in the School of Electrical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology. Dr. Borth is a member of Motorola's Science Advisory Board Associates and has been elected a Dan Noble Fellow, Motorola's highest honorary technical award. He has been issued 31 patents and has authored or co-authored chapters of five books in addition to 25 publications. He received the Distinguished Alumnus Award from the University of Illinois Electrical and Computer Engineering Alumni Association and was elected a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers for his contributions to the design and development of wireless telecommunication systems. He is a registered professional engineer in the state of Illinois. Dr. Borth was a member of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board from 2000 to 2003. He also served on the CSTB committee that produced the report Information Technology for Counter-Terrorism: Immediate Action and Future Possibilities (2003). Robert W. Brodersen is the John R. Whinnery Distinguished Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of California at Berkeley. He is also the co-scientific director of the Berkeley Wireless Research Center, where his research focus is the application of integrated circuits to personal communication systems, with emphasis on wireless communications and low-power design. Dr. Brodersen's research is focused in the areas of low power design and wireless communications and the CAD tools necessary to support these activities. He has won best paper awards for a number of journal and conference papers in the areas of integrated circuit design, CAD, and communications, including the W.G. Baker Award in 1979. In 1982 he became a fellow of the IEEE. He was corecipient of the IEEE Morris K. Liebmann Award in 1983. He received technical achievement awards in the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society in 1986, from the Signal Processing Society in 1991, and in 1999 from the ACM Special Interest Group in Mobile Computing. Dr. Brodersen was elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering in 1988. In 1996, he received the IEEE Solid State Circuits Award. He was awarded an honorary doctorate from the University of Lund, Sweden, in 1999, and in 2000 he received the Millennium Award from the Circuits and Systems Society and the Golden Jubilee Award from the IEEE. In 2001 he was awarded the Lewis Winner Award for outstanding paper at the IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference. He has served on the editorial board or as reviewer for numerous scholarly journals and publications, including the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, IEEE Transactions on VLSI Systems, IEEE Personal Communications Magazine, and Wireless Personal Communications (Kluwer Press). He is the author or co-author of over 60 journal publications; 120 published conference papers; and author, co-author, editor, or contributor to 14 books, including An Anatomy of a Silicon Compiler (1992, Kluwer Academic Publishers) and Low Power Digital CMOS Design (1995, Kluwer Academic Publishers). He received his Ph.D. degree in engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1972. David D. Clark graduated from Swarthmore College in 1966 and received his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1973. He has worked since then at the MIT Laboratory for

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BIOGRAPHIES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS 41 Computer Science, where he is currently a senior research scientist in charge of the Advanced Network Architecture Group. Dr. Clark's research interests include networks, network protocols, operating systems, distributed systems, and computer and communications security. After receiving his Ph.D., he worked on the early stages of the ARPANET and on the development of token ring local area network technology. Since the mid-1970s, Dr. Clark has been involved in the development of the Internet. From 1981 to 1989, he acted as chief protocol architect in this development and chaired the Internet Activities Board. His current research area is protocols and architectures for very large and very high speed networks. Specific activities include extensions to the Internet to support real-time traffic, explicit allocation of service, pricing, and new network technologies. In the security area, Dr. Clark participated in the early development of the multilevel secure Multics operating system. He developed an information security model that stresses integrity of data rather than disclosure control. Dr. Clark is a fellow of the ACM and the IEEE and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He received the ACM SIGCOMM award and the IEEE award in international communications, as well as the IEEE Hamming Award for his work on the Internet. He is a consultant to a number of companies and serves on a number of technical advisory boards. Dr. Clark is currently chair of the CSTB (term ending June 30, 2004). He chaired the committee that produced the CSTB report Computers at Risk: Safe Computing in the Information Age and served on the committees that produced several other CSTB reports. Thomas (Ted) E. Darcie received his Ph.D. in aerospace physics from the University of Toronto in 1982. Currently, he is a professor at the University of Victoria, British Columbia, holding a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Optical Systems for Communications, Imaging, and Sensing. Previously he worked at AT&T Bell Laboratories, where he joined the technical staff to study a wide variety of topics related to light-wave telecommunications, including fiber fabrication processes, semiconductor lasers, optical amplifiers, and numerous modulation and multiplexing techniques. He has been a lead figure in the development of light-wave systems for analog applications in cable television and wireless systems. As head of access communications research at AT&T Bell Laboratories (1989-1995), Dr. Darcie was responsible for technology innovation in wireless, light-wave, and hybrid fiber-coax systems. He has authored over 100 technical publications and 25 patents spanning this broad set of technologies. From 1995 to 2002, he was vice president at AT&T Laboratories, in charge of communications infrastructure research. His research laboratory provided technology support for AT&T's diverse requirements in optical networking, broadband access, fixed wireless access, wireless LAN, and cellular systems. His team worked closely with AT&T businesses to provide technical expertise and vision and has numerous programs devoted to the evolution of mobile and broadband services, applications, and technologies. From 2002 to 2003, he was vice president for AT&T Labs' Network Architecture and Strategic Operations Planning, with responsibility for connecting innovative network technologies with opportunities within AT&T's network. Dr. Darcie is an AT&T fellow, a fellow of the IEEE, and is currently a member of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. Andrea Goldsmith received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of California at Berkeley in 1986, 1991, and 1994, respectively. She was an assistant professor in the department of electrical engineering at Caltech from 1994 to 1999. In 1999, she joined the electrical engineering department at Stanford University, where she is currently an associate professor. Her industry experience includes affiliation with Maxim Technologies (1986-1990), where she worked on packet radio and satellite communication systems, and with AT&T Bell Laboratories (1991-1992), where she worked on microcell modeling and channel estimation. Dr. Goldsmith's research includes work on the capacity of wireless channels and networks; wireless information and communication theory; multiantenna wireless systems; energy-constrained communications; communications for distributed control; cross-layer design for cellular systems ad hoc wireless networks; and sensor networks. Dr. Goldsmith holds the Bredt Faculty Development Scholar Chair at Stanford and is a recipient of the National Academy of Engineering Gilbreth Lectureship, Stanford's Terman Faculty Fellowship, a National Science Foundation CAREER Development Award, the Office of Naval Research Young

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42 SUMMARY OF A FORUM ON SPECTRUM MANAGEMENT POLICY REFORM Investigator Award, a National Semiconductor Faculty Development Award, an Okawa Foundation Award, and the David Griep Memorial Prize from the University of California at Berkeley. She was an editor for the IEEE Transactions on Communications from 1995 to 2001 and has been an editor for the IEEE Wireless Communications magazine since 1995. She is also an elected member of Stanford's faculty senate and the IEEE Information Theory Society Board of Governors. Dr. Goldsmith served on the CSTB committee that produced the report Evolution of Untethered Communications (1997). Dale N. Hatfield is currently an independent consultant and adjunct professor in the Department of Interdisciplinary Telecommunications at the University of Colorado at Boulder (CU). Between December 2000 and April 2002, Mr. Hatfield served as chair of the department. Prior to joining CU, Mr. Hatfield was the chief of the Office of Engineering and Technology at the FCC and immediately before that was chief technologist at the commission. Before joining the FCC in December 1997, he was CEO of Mr. Hatfield Associates, Inc., a multidisciplinary telecommunications consulting firm in Boulder, Colorado, for 15 years. Before that, Mr. Hatfield was deputy Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Communications and Information and deputy administrator of the NTIA. Before moving to NTIA, Mr. Hatfield was chief of the Office of Plans and Policy at the FCC. In 1973 Mr. Hatfield received a Department of Commerce Silver Medal for contributions to domestic communications satellite policy, and in 1999 he received the Attorney General's Distinguished Service Award. In 2000, he received the PCIA Foundation's Eugene C. Bowler award for exceptional professionalism and dedication in government service and the FCC's Gold Medal Award for distinguished service. More recently, he received the distinguished engineer award from the University of Colorado at Boulder. He currently is a fellow of the Radio Club of America. In February 2001, the FTC appointed Mr. Hatfield as monitor trustee in the AOL/Time Warner merger. Currently, Mr. Hatfield is serving on the board of directors of Crown Castle International and KBDI TV-12 public television in Denver. He holds a B.S. in electrical engineering from Case Institute of Technology and an M.S. in industrial management from Purdue University. Michael Katz is the Edward J. and Mollie Arnold Professor of Business Administration of the Haas Economic Analysis and Policy Group and Director of the Center for Telecommunications and Digital Convergence at the University of California at Berkeley. From 2001 to 2002, he was Deputy Assistant Attorney General for economic analysis in the Antitrust Division of the Department of Justice. From 1994 to 1996, he was chief economist at the Federal Communications Commission. Dr. Katz is co-editor of California Management Review and Journal of Economics and Management Strategy. He is a former member of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Oxford University. Paul J. Kolodzy is director of the Wireless Network Security Center (WiNSeC), a new research facility at Stevens Institute of Technology that will draw on wide-ranging expertise to design, develop, and evaluate technology for the secure transmission of voice, video, and data. He is also is a professor in the schools of Engineering and Technology Management at Stevens. Previously, Dr. Kolodzy had been appointed as the senior spectrum policy advisor at the FCC, and he was also chair of the FCC's newly created Spectrum Policy Task Force, which was charged with examining spectrum allocation processes and other issues so that spectrum can be put to the highest and best use in a timely manner. Before joining the FCC, Dr. Kolodzy served as a program manager within the Advanced Technology Office at DARPA in the Department of Defense. At DARPA, he oversaw the development of next-generation communications technology, which included the neXt Generation Communications (XG) initiative. The XG project is developing technology that has the potential to fundamentally change the manner which spectrum is allocated and assigned. Dr. Kolodzy has also held positions at MIT's Lincoln Laboratory and Lockheed Martin Corporation in the development and management of advanced signal processing, RF, and EO systems. He received a B.S. from Purdue University in chemical engineering and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Case Western Reserve University. His doctoral work focused on

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BIOGRAPHIES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS 43 laser measurement systems. Larry Larson is professor of electrical and computer engineering and director of the Center for Wireless Communications at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). Dr. Larson's research ranges from electronic circuits and systems to electronic devices and materials. He develops high-speed circuits based on InP (indium phosphide) and GaAs (gallium arsenide) as well as silicon-germanium and CMOS technology. He also explores applications for micromachining technology in the manufacture of high- speed integrated circuits and studies new packaging technology for them. Dr. Larson's current research is specifically also focused on low-power circuit design and RF design techniques for wireless communications. He recently completed CDMA Mobile Radio Design, a book on how to design the hardware and software for wireless handsets based on code-division multiple access technology. CDMA is the foundation of all third-generation wireless technologies, including Europe's W-CDMA standard and CDMA2000. As director of the industry-sponsored Center for Wireless Communications (CWC) at UCSD, Dr. Larson is in a unique position to comment on the development and deployment of 3G wireless, including new generations of circuits. He oversees a wide range of ongoing research projects, with funding from CWC's 17 corporate members. He is the first holder of the Communications Industry endowed chair at the Jacobs School. He joined the UCSD faculty in 1996, after a 16-year career at Hughes Research Laboratories, where he pioneered the development of analog integrated circuits and low-noise HEMTs in III-V technology, as well as microwave integrated circuits in SiGe HBT technology and RF MEMs technology. Dr. Larson received his Ph.D. from the University of California at Los Angeles in 1986. He is an IEEE fellow and co-winner of the 1996 Hughes Electronics Lawrence Hyland Patent Award and the 1999 IBM Microelectronics Excellence Award. David P. Reed is a fellow at HP Labs and an adjunct professor at the MIT Media Laboratory. Dr. Reed's work focuses on using digital technology to transform the design of technological, business, and social systems. His current explorations center on exploiting new information technologies that enable people to be more effective, including mobile computing; highly scalable wireless networking; group information sharing; pervasive networking; video media processing; and infrastructures for electronic commerce. Dr. Reed spent 4 years at Interval Research Corporation, exploring portable and consumer media technology. For 7 years prior to joining Interval, Dr. Reed was vice president and chief scientist for Lotus Development Corporation, where he led the design and implementation of key products, including 1-2-3, and technical business strategy. Dr. Reed was also a professor in MIT's Laboratory for Computer Science. He is co-inventor of the end-to-end argument, often called the fundamental architectural principle of the Internet. Dr. Reed holds a B.S. in electrical engineering and M.S and Ph.D. degrees in computer science and engineering from MIT. Gregory L. Rosston is the deputy director of the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. His research focuses on industrial organization, antitrust, and regulation. He has written numerous articles on competition in local telecommunications, implementation of the Telecommunications Act of 1996, auctions, and spectrum policy. He has also co-edited two books, including Interconnection and the Internet: Selected Papers from the 1996 Telecommunications Policy Research Conference. Prior to joining Stanford University, Dr. Rosston served as deputy chief economist of the FCC. At the FCC, he helped to implement the Telecommunications Act. In this work, he helped to design and write the rules the commission adopted as a framework to encourage efficient competition in telecommunications markets. He also helped with the design and implementation of the FCC's spectrum auctions. Dr. Rosston received his Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University and his A.B. in economics from the University of California at Berkeley. David Skellern is currently the technology director for Cisco's Wireless Networking Business Unit. He has been a consultant for leading companies in the United States, Europe, and Japan on the development of multiservice and broadband communications networks. He held a senior staff faculty

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44 SUMMARY OF A FORUM ON SPECTRUM MANAGEMENT POLICY REFORM position at HP Laboratories from 1993 to 1999. In 1989, Dr. Skellern joined Macquarie University as professor of electronics. While at Macquarie University, he worked to develop the core technologies that led to the formation of Radiata Communications Pty Ltd. in 1997. He received B.Sc. (1972), B.E. (1974), and Ph.D. (1985) degrees from the University of Sydney. STAFF Jon Eisenberg, study director, is a senior program officer with the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council. At CSTB, he has been study director for a diverse body of work, including a series of studies exploring networking technologies and Internet and broadband policy. Current studies include an examination of emerging wireless technologies and spectrum policy and a review of the National Archives and Records Administration's digital materials preservation strategy. From 1995 to 1997, Dr. Eisenberg was an AAAS Science, Engineering, and Diplomacy Fellow at the U.S. Agency for International Development, where he worked on environmental management, technology transfer, and telecommunications policy issues. He received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Washington in 1996 and B.S. in physics with honors from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in 1988. Julie Esanu is a program officer for the Office of International Scientific and Technical Information Programs (ISTIP) at the National Academies. Her emphasis is policy and management issues related to digital scientific and technical data and information, primarily through the support of the U.S. National Committee for the Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA), an interdisciplinary committee of the International Council of Science. Ms. Esanu is the coeditor of two recent and related National Academies reports, including Open Access and the Public Domain in Digital Data for Science: Proceedings of a Symposium (National Academies Press, forthcoming) and The Role of Scientific and Technical Data and Information in the Public Domain: Proceedings of a Symposium (NAP, 2003). She worked with the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board to convene a workshop on the spectrum management policy reform and has provided program and research support to other National Academies' projects examining the role of remote sensing research and applications; reviewing C4I planning for the Department of Defense; assessing research programs at the Army Research Laboratory; and examining the allocation of federal research and development funds. Ms. Esanu received her bachelor's degree in political science and international affairs from the George Washington University. Kristen Batch is a research associate with the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council. She is involved with the project focusing on wireless communication technologies and telecommunications research and development. While pursuing an M.A. in international communications from American University, she interned at the NTIA, in the Office of International Affairs, and at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, in the Technology and Public Policy Program. She also earned a B.A. from Carnegie Mellon University in literary and cultural studies and Spanish and received two travel grants to conduct independent research in Spain. Margaret Marsh Huynh is a senior program assistant with the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council since January 1999 supporting several projects. She is currently supporting The Future of Supercomputing, Wireless Technology Prospects and Policy Options, and Internet Searching and the Domain Name System: Technical Alternatives and Policy Implications. She previously worked on the projects that produced the reports Beyond Productivity: Information Technology, Innovation, and Creativity; IT Roadmap to a Geospatial Future; Building a Workforce for the Information Economy; and The Digital Dilemma: Intellectual Property in the

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BIOGRAPHIES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS 45 Information Age. Ms. Huynh also assisted with the project Exploring Information Technology Issues for the Behavioral and Social Sciences (Digital Divide and Democracy). She assists on other projects as needed. Prior to coming to the NRC, Ms. Huynh worked as a meeting assistant at Management for Meetings and from September 1996 to April 1998 as a meeting assistant at the American Society for Civil Engineers. Ms. Huynh has a B.A. (1990) in liberal studies with minors in sociology and psychology from Salisbury State University, Maryland.