Appendix 1
Biographical Sketches of the Committee Members

PAUL C. JENNINGS, Chair, has been a member of the faculty at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) since 1966. He has served Caltech in many capacities, including chair of the Division of Engineering and Applied Science (1985-89), vice president and provost (1989-95), twice as acting vice president for business and finance (1995 and 1998-99). Currently professor of civil engineering and applied mechanics, emeritus, Dr. Jennings is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), past chair of the California Council on Science and Technology, a past president of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute, and a past president of the Seismological Society of America. Professor Jennings is the author of numerous technical papers on earthquake engineering and dynamics of structures and has served as a consultant on the design of high-rise buildings, offshore drilling towers, nuclear power plants, and other major projects. He was a member of the Board of Inquiry on the Loma Prieta earthquake, appointed by California’s Governor Deukmejian. His awards include the Newmark Medal, the Huber Prize of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), and the Honor Alumnus and Achievement in Academia Awards from Colorado State University. Dr. Jennings received his Ph.D. in civil engineering from Caltech.

DAVID K. CAMPBELL, professor and dean of the Boston University College of Engineering, is a physicist who is well known for his work in the field of nonlinear science. Prior to assuming his current position in 2000, Dr. Campbell was professor and head of the physics department at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Before joining the Univer-



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Maintaining High Scientific Quality at Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories Appendix 1 Biographical Sketches of the Committee Members PAUL C. JENNINGS, Chair, has been a member of the faculty at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) since 1966. He has served Caltech in many capacities, including chair of the Division of Engineering and Applied Science (1985-89), vice president and provost (1989-95), twice as acting vice president for business and finance (1995 and 1998-99). Currently professor of civil engineering and applied mechanics, emeritus, Dr. Jennings is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), past chair of the California Council on Science and Technology, a past president of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute, and a past president of the Seismological Society of America. Professor Jennings is the author of numerous technical papers on earthquake engineering and dynamics of structures and has served as a consultant on the design of high-rise buildings, offshore drilling towers, nuclear power plants, and other major projects. He was a member of the Board of Inquiry on the Loma Prieta earthquake, appointed by California’s Governor Deukmejian. His awards include the Newmark Medal, the Huber Prize of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), and the Honor Alumnus and Achievement in Academia Awards from Colorado State University. Dr. Jennings received his Ph.D. in civil engineering from Caltech. DAVID K. CAMPBELL, professor and dean of the Boston University College of Engineering, is a physicist who is well known for his work in the field of nonlinear science. Prior to assuming his current position in 2000, Dr. Campbell was professor and head of the physics department at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Before joining the Univer-

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Maintaining High Scientific Quality at Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories sity of Illinois in 1992, he was director of the Center for Nonlinear Studies at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL, 1987-92), adjunct professor of physics at the University of New Mexico (1990-92), staff member at LANL (1977-92), J.R. Oppenheimer Fellow at LANL (1974-77), an exchange scientist to the Soviet Union through the National Academy of Sciences (1977), a member of the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton University (1972-74), a fellow at the Center of Advanced Study at the University of Illinois (1970-72), and an instructor and research associate in the University of Illinois Department of Physics (1970-72). Over the years, he has received fellowships from a number of institutions, including the American Physical Society (APS) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). He also is founding editor of the journal CHAOS. Among his honors, he was Stanislaw Ulam Fellow at LANL (1998-99). Dr. Campbell received his bachelor’s degree in chemistry and physics from Harvard, a Part III Mathematics Tripos, with distinction, from Cambridge University, and his Ph.D. in theoretical physics and applied mathematics from Cambridge. PHILIP E. COYLE III is a senior advisor to the president of the Center for Defense Information and a defense consultant. He is a recognized expert on U.S. and worldwide military research, development, and testing, on operational military matters, and on national security policy and defense spending. From September 1994 through January 2001, Mr. Coyle was assistant secretary of defense and director, Operational Test and Evaluation, in the Department of Defense, and he is the longest serving director in the 19-year history of the office. In this capacity, he was the principal advisor to the secretary of defense on test and evaluation in the Department of Defense (DOD). From 1959 to 1979, and again from 1981 to 1993, Mr. Coyle worked at LLNL. From 1987 to 1993, he served as laboratory associate director and deputy to the laboratory director. In recognition of his 33 years of service to the laboratory and to the University of California, the university named Mr. Coyle Laboratory Associate Director Emeritus. During the Carter Administration, Mr. Coyle served as the DOE’s principal deputy assistant secretary for defense programs. In this capacity, he had oversight responsibility for the nuclear weapons testing programs of the department. Along with many other honors, Mr. Coyle has been awarded the Allan R. Matthews Award, the highest honor given by the International Test and Evaluation Association, for his contributions to the management and technology of test and evaluation, and the Hollis Award from the National Defense Industrial Association for his lifelong achievement in defense test and evaluation. Mr. Coyle received his M.S. degree in mechanical engineering from Dartmouth College.

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Maintaining High Scientific Quality at Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories ROBERT F. CURL, JR., is the Kenneth S. Pitzer-Schlumberger Professor of Natural Sciences in the Rice University Department of Chemistry and a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). The principal longterm theme of his research has been high-resolution gas-phase molecular spectroscopy. Professor Curl, Richard Smalley, and Sir Harold Kroto shared the 1996 Nobel Prize for Chemistry for their codiscovery of C-60 and the fullerenes. He has developed methods for analyzing fine structure and hyperfine structure in molecular spectra, and he is a pioneer in laser spectroscopy and in spectroscopic probes of chemically reacting systems. He joined the faculty at Rice in 1958. Before this, he was a research fellow at Harvard University. Professor Curl has received numerous prestigious honors and awards throughout his career. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Optical Society of America, and he is a member of the European Academy of Arts, Sciences, and Humanities, American Chemical Society, Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Lambda Upsilon, and Sigma Xi. He received his B.A. degree from Rice University and his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley. LARRY N. DUMAS retired as deputy director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in 2001 after a 39-year career there. As deputy director, he was JPL’s chief operating officer, responsible for the daily management of its resources and activities. Prior to becoming deputy director, he was assistant laboratory director for the Office of Telecommunications and Data Acquisition, overseeing NASA’s worldwide Deep Space Network of communications facilities. Previously, he served in various engineering and management positions in spacecraft development and flight operations and in terrestrial photovoltaic applications. Prior to joining JPL, Mr. Dumas served in the field of shipboard communications and engineering as a U.S. Navy officer. He received bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mechanical engineering from the University of California at Berkeley, the former with highest honors. Among other advisory activities, he has served on the Federal Technical Capability Panel for the DOE Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (2000), which provided a nuclear safety workforce assessment at the DOE laboratories, and on the Fermilab Administrative Visiting Committee for the Universities Research Association (2001), which reviewed the laboratory’s administrative operations, including its relationship with DOE. He has received a number of awards, including NASA’s Exceptional Service Medal in 1972 for his work on the Mariner Mars orbiter and in 1981 for his work on the Voyager mission to the outer planets. In 2001 NASA recognized his record of laboratory leadership by awarding him its highest honor, the NASA Distinguished Service Medal. Mr. Dumas is a member of Sigma Xi and the American Insti-

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Maintaining High Scientific Quality at Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories tute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and he is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). He is a past chair of the Los Angeles Section of ASME and a past president of the Caltech Management Association. LLOYD A. DUSCHA served for more than 40 years in progressive assignments with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, including 25 years in executive management positions, culminating in his selection as deputy director of engineering and construction, the ranking civilian position. His experience encompasses the management of planning, engineering, construction, and operation of water resource projects, military construction, and work for other agencies. As an independent consulting engineer since 1990, his assignments have spanned the business, managerial, and technical aspects related to the engineering-construction industry on worldwide projects in both private and governmental sectors. He has served with numerous committees and groups at the National Academies, including the Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment; the Committee to Assess the Policies and Practices of the DOE to Design, Manage, and Procure Environmental Restoration, Waste Management, and Other Construction Projects; and as chair of the Committee on Long-Term Research Needs for Managing Transuranic and Mixed Wastes at DOE Sites. Currently, Mr. Duscha is serving on the Committee to Review and Assess DOE Project Management and the Committee on Opportunities for Accelerating Characterization and Treatment of Waste at DOE Nuclear Weapons Sites. Mr. Duscha was elected to the NAE in 1987. He is a fellow of ASCE and the Society of American Military Engineers, and a member of Tau Beta Pi and Chi Epsilon. Mr. Duscha earned his bachelor’s degree in civil engineering, with distinction, from the University of Minnesota, which has awarded him the Board of Regent’s Outstanding Achievement Award. PAUL A. FLEURY has been dean of engineering and the Frederick William Beinecke Professor of Engineering and Applied Physics at Yale University since December 2000. He was elected to the NAE in 1996 and the NAS in 1999. Prior to joining Yale, Dr. Fleury was dean of the School of Engineering at the University of New Mexico from January 1996, following 30 years at AT&T Bell Laboratories. His last position there was director of the Materials and Processing Research Laboratory. Earlier assignments at Bell Labs (1970-91) included head of the Condensed States Physics Research Department, director of the Materials Research Laboratory, and director of the Physical Research Laboratory. In January 1992, he was elected vice president for Research and Exploratory Technology at Sandia National Laboratories, where he was responsible for programs in

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Maintaining High Scientific Quality at Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories physical sciences, high-performance computing, engineering sciences, pulsed power, microelectronics, photonics, materials and process science and engineering, and computer networking. In October 1993, upon termination of the contract under which AT&T managed Sandia for DOE, he returned to Bell Laboratories. He holds five patents and has authored more than 130 scientific publications. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society (APS) and the AAAS. In 1985, Dr. Fleury received the prestigious Michelson-Morley Award for his experimental research on laser spectroscopy and nonlinear optics in condensed matter. He has been chair of the Division of Condensed Matter Physics of the APS and of the Solid State Sciences Committee of the National Research Council (NRC). He received the 1992 Frank Isakson Prize of the APS for his research on optical phenomena in condensed matter systems. In 1995, he was appointed to the secretary of energy’s Laboratory Operations Board. In 1997 he was appointed to the Science and Technology Panel of the University of California’s President’s Council on the National Laboratories. He is a board member of Brookhaven Science Associates, which manages Brookhaven National Laboratory. He received his doctorate in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). EDWARD B. GILLER is a consultant and retired U.S. Air Force Major General, with more than 30 years of experience in senior management positions in matters related to nuclear weapons, involving the DOD, Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), Energy Research and Development Agency (ERDA; later the DOE), and Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Most recently, he was a consultant to Sandia National Laboratories on intelligence and nuclear matters. Previously, since his retirement from the Air Force in 1972, he served with the Joint Chiefs of Staff (1977-84), including service as the Joint Chiefs of Staff representative to the nuclear test ban talks between the United States, the United Kingdom, and the U.S.S.R. (1977-80), and he served as assistant general manager for national security for the headquarters of the AEC and ERDA (1972-77). During his career with the Air Force, his assignments included assistant general manager for Military Applications with the AEC (1967-72), director of Science and Technology at USAF Headquarters (1964-67), assistant deputy director, Science and Technology at the CIA (1959-64), director of the Research Directorate at the Air Force Special Weapons Center at Kirtland Air Force Base (1954-60), and chief of the Radiation Branch of the Armed Forces Special Weapons Project (successor to the Manhattan District, 1950-54). After serving as a fighter pilot in World War II, Maj. Gen. Giller received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Illinois.

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Maintaining High Scientific Quality at Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories JAMES GLIMM is chair of the Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics and director of the Center for Advanced Manufacturing, both at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He previously held faculty positions at New York University, Rockefeller University, and MIT. An expert in computational science, Dr. Glimm has worked for years with LANL collaborators and with some DOE and LANL funding. He is a member of the NAS and a recent recipient of the Presidential Medal of Science. Dr. Glimm also has been awarded the Steele prize of the American Mathematical Society and the Dannie Heinemann prize of the APS. He is a former member of the National Academies’ Army Research Laboratory Technical Assessment Board. His research interests include computation and modeling for turbulent and chaotic flows, mathematical theory of conservation laws, stochastic methods, modeling of elastic-plastic deformation, and the application of mathematical methods to industrial problems. He received his Ph.D. in mathematics from Columbia University. ARTHUR H. GUENTHER, on Intergovernmental Personnel Act (IPA) assignment at the Center for High Technology Materials at the University New Mexico, sponsored by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, is a leading expert on directed-energy weaponry, including lasers, micro-waves, particle beams, and pulsed-power technology. His work in nuclear weapons simulation was concerned with the response of materials to adverse environments, including underground testing. Prior to joining the University of New Mexico, Dr. Guenther served as chief scientist at the Air Force Weapons Laboratory (1973-88), as chief scientist for Advanced Defense Technology at LANL (1988-91), and as scientific adviser for laboratory development at Sandia National Laboratories (1991-1997). Dr. Guenther also was science adviser to three governors of New Mexico (1988-1993). He was a long-standing member of the NRC’s Army Research Laboratory Technical Assessment Board and a member of the NRC’s Board on Physics and Astronomy’s Committee on Optical Science and Engineering. He is the recipient of numerous awards from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the Laser Institute of America, the Optical Society of America, and state and federal governments. He is a fellow of the Optical Society of America, the Laser Institute of America, the IEEE, and the International Society for Optical Engineers (SPIE), for which he is a member of the board of directors. Dr. Guenther is an active consultant to DOD organizations, DOE national laboratories, and other groups. He is past-president of the International Commission for Optics and a member of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Ural Division).

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Maintaining High Scientific Quality at Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories ALAN J. McLAUGHLIN is a consultant in the strategic planning and advanced technology fields. In 2000, he retired as assistant director of the MIT Lincoln Laboratory, where he was responsible for advanced electronic technology, air traffic control, and surface surveillance mission areas. Currently, he is special assistant to the director, MIT Lincoln Laboratory, and a visiting scientist at the Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute. During his 33-year tenure at Lincoln Laboratory, he served in a number of positions, with responsibilities that included programs in speech, radar, seismic, and image signal processing, computer networks, digital integrated circuits, and machine intelligence technology. Mr. McLaughlin also has served as an advisor to the DOD for more than 25 years, including service on Defense Science Board and Air Force Scientific Advisory Board studies, and he is a past member of the NRC’s committees on Army Unmanned Ground Vehicle Technology, Future Technologies for Army Multimedia Communications, and Modernization of the Worldwide Military Command and Control System. He also has served on various other boards and committees. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from Northeastern University, and he saw military service as a lieutenant in the Army Signal Corps Laboratory. CHERRY A. MURRAY, physical sciences research senior vice president at Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, is a physicist recognized for her work in surface physics, light scattering, and complex fluids. She is best known for her imaging work in phase transitions of colloidal systems. After receiving her Ph.D. in physics from MIT, she was hired at Bell Labs in 1978. In her current position, Dr. Murray has responsibility for the Nanotechnology, Wireless, and Physical Research Laboratories, and she is chair of the New Jersey Nanotechnology Consortium. Dr. Murray has been responsible for establishing the relationship of Bell Labs Research with Lucent’s largest business unit, Mobility Solutions. Among her accomplishments at Bell Labs, Lucent Technologies, Dr. Murray managed the 40 GB/s electronics group and the invention and development of the optical fabric for the first all-optical cross-connect for telecommunications networks, Lucent’s Wavestar LambdaRouter. Dr. Murray is a member of the NAS, NAE, and American Academy of Art and Sciences. She is a fellow of the American Physical Society (APS) and the AAAS and a member of the American Chemical Society, the Optical Society of America, the Materials Research Society, and Sigma Xi. She won the APS Maria Goeppert-Mayer Award in 1989. She sits on numerous advisory committees and boards, including the National Sciences Resource Center, dedicated to the propagation of inquiry-based science education.

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Maintaining High Scientific Quality at Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories She is currently a general councilor of the APS, a councilor of the NAS, and on the University of Chicago’s Board of Governors for Argonne National Laboratory. She has just rotated off the DOE’s Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee. She has authored numerous publications and holds two patents. THOMAS A. SAPONAS recently retired as senior vice president and chief technology officer for Agilent Technologies, where he set a long-term technology strategy for over $1 billion in R&D investment and directly supervised the Central Research Laboratory with about $80 million in annual expenses. Before joining Agilent in 1999, he served in a number of positions in the Hewlett Packard Company (HP), including vice president and general manager of the Electronic Instruments Group, general manager of the Lake Stevens Division, and general manager of the Colorado Springs Division. In these positions, his responsibilities varied and included management of major company units; profit and loss responsibility for worldwide R&D, marketing, and manufacturing of a variety of HP products; manufacturing responsibility for thin and thick film microcircuits for all of HP; and responsibility for some company sites. In 1986-87, he took a 1-year leave of absence from HP to serve as White House fellow, special assistant to the secretary of the Navy, where he performed special projects, ranging from R&D program reviews to personnel programs, and he was awarded the Distinguished Civil Servant award. Mr. Saponas serves on the NRC’s Board on Assessment of National Institute of Standards and Technology Programs and on the board of directors of the University of Colorado Foundation, and he is chair of the Engineering Advisory Committee of the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs. Previously, he served on the Naval Research Laboratory Advisory Committee. Mr. Saponas received his bachelor’s degree in computer science and electrical engineering and his master’s degree in electrical engineering from the University of Colorado, and he graduated from the Advanced Management Program, INSEAD, Fontainebleau, France. HARVEY W. SCHADLER, a metallurgist, retired as a technical director for the General Electric Corporate Research and Development Center. He joined GE in 1957 after receiving his Ph.D. in metallurgical engineering from Purdue University. Dr. Schadler is a fellow of ASM International (formerly the American Society for Metals) and a member of the NAE, the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical and Petroleum Engineers (AIME), and the AIME Accreditation Board for Engineering Technology. He is the recipient of the Alfred E. Geisler Award for the Eastern New York Chapter of ASM International. Dr. Schadler has served on the NRC’s Board on Army Science and Technology and its Army Research Labora-

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Maintaining High Scientific Quality at Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories tory Technical Assessment Board. He received his Ph.D. from Purdue University. JOHN C. SOMMERER is chief technology officer of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL), and he chairs APL’s Science and Technology Council. He manages APL’s overall internal IR&D program, its participation in the educational programs of JHU’s Whiting School of Engineering, and its Office of Technology Transfer, and he is the line supervisor of the Research and Technology Development Center. In addition, he is an adjunct faculty member in applied physics, applied mathematics, and technical management. Dr. Sommerer has made internationally recognized theoretical and experimental contributions to the fields of nonlinear dynamics and complex systems. He has served on several technical advisory bodies for the U.S. government and has received numerous prestigious awards. Dr. Sommerer is a member of the Security Affairs Support Association, the APS and its Division of Fluid Mechanics, and the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics and its Activity Group on Dynamical Systems. He also is a former member of the NRC’s Army Research Laboratory Technical Assessment Board and is a director of the James Rouse Entrepreneurial Fund. He holds a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Maryland.