Appendix E
Committee Biographical Information

Mary Jane Osborn, Chair, is professor and head of molecular, microbial, and structural biology at the University of Connecticut Health Center. Her fields of specialization are microbial biochemistry, microbiology, and molecular biology. Current research interests include mechanism of cell division in Escherichia coli. She was elected to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in 1978. Dr. Osborn has served on numerous distinguished committees, including the National Science Board, the President’s Committee on the National Medal of Sciences, the Advisory Council of the National Institutes of Health’s Division of Research Grants (chair, 1992-1994), the Advisory Council of the Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology, the Board of Scientific Advisors for the Roche Institute for Molecular Biology (chair, 1983-1985), and the NAS Council. Dr. Osborn received her B.A. in physiology from the University of California, Berkeley and her Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of Washington, Seattle.

R. Rhodes Trussell, Vice Chair, is the President of Trussell Technologies, Inc. in Pasadena, California. Dr. Trussell is chair of the Water Science and Technology Board. He previously served on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Science Advisory Board and chaired that Board’s Drinking Water Committee. Dr. Trussell has served on several National Research Council (NRC) committees including, most recently, the Committee on Drinking Water Contaminants, and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). He received his B.S. in civil engineering and his M.S. and Ph.D. in sanitary engineering from the University of California, Berkeley.



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Indicators for Waterborne Pathogens Appendix E Committee Biographical Information Mary Jane Osborn, Chair, is professor and head of molecular, microbial, and structural biology at the University of Connecticut Health Center. Her fields of specialization are microbial biochemistry, microbiology, and molecular biology. Current research interests include mechanism of cell division in Escherichia coli. She was elected to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in 1978. Dr. Osborn has served on numerous distinguished committees, including the National Science Board, the President’s Committee on the National Medal of Sciences, the Advisory Council of the National Institutes of Health’s Division of Research Grants (chair, 1992-1994), the Advisory Council of the Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology, the Board of Scientific Advisors for the Roche Institute for Molecular Biology (chair, 1983-1985), and the NAS Council. Dr. Osborn received her B.A. in physiology from the University of California, Berkeley and her Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of Washington, Seattle. R. Rhodes Trussell, Vice Chair, is the President of Trussell Technologies, Inc. in Pasadena, California. Dr. Trussell is chair of the Water Science and Technology Board. He previously served on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Science Advisory Board and chaired that Board’s Drinking Water Committee. Dr. Trussell has served on several National Research Council (NRC) committees including, most recently, the Committee on Drinking Water Contaminants, and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). He received his B.S. in civil engineering and his M.S. and Ph.D. in sanitary engineering from the University of California, Berkeley.

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Indicators for Waterborne Pathogens Ricardo De Leon is the laboratory manager of the microbiology unit in the Water Quality Section of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California in La Verne, California. His current activities and research include the development and implementation of new technology for the detection of infectious Cryptosporidium and other pathogens in water; disinfection of enteric organisms by oxidation and UV light; use of bacterial spores as surrogates for treatment process evaluation; impact of body contact recreation on water quality; and methods development for emerging waterborne pathogens. Dr. De Leon is a member of the Drinking Water Committee of EPA’s Science Advisory Board. He received a B.S. and Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Arizona. Daniel Y.C. Fung is professor of animal sciences and industry and professor of food science at Kansas State University. His current research focuses on rapid methods and automation in microbiology related to food, environmental, industrial and medical specimens and microbiology of food processing. Dr. Fung’s research interests include the rapid detection of harmful and beneficial microorganisms in food and the environment and the control of pathogenic organisms by physical and chemical methods, and fermentation procedures. He is the editor of the Journal on Rapid Methods. Dr. Fung has been elected a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, Institute for Food Technologists, International Academy of Food Science and Technology, and Institute of Food Science and Technology (U.K.). Dr. Fung received his B.A. in biological sciences from International Christian University in Tokyo, Japan, M.S. in Public Health from the University of North Carolina, and Ph.D. in food technology/food microbiology from Iowa State University. Charles N. Haas is the Betz Chair Professor of Environmental Engineering at Drexel University. He was formerly a professor and acting chair in the Department of Environmental Engineering at the Illinois Institute of Technology. Dr. Haas’ areas of research involve microbial and chemical risk assessment, hazardous waste processing, industrial wastewater treatment, waste recovery, and water and wastewater disinfection processes. He is a member of the Water Science and Technology Board, a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, a councilor of the Society for Risk Analysis, and a director of the Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors. Dr. Haas has served on several NRC committees, most recently including the Committee on Toxicants and Pathogens in Biosolids Applied to Land, and NRC’s Panel on Water System Security Research for its Review of EPA Homeland Security Efforts. He received a B.S. in biology and an M.S. in environmental engineering from the Illinois Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the University of Illinois.

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Indicators for Waterborne Pathogens Deborah A. Levy is a commissioned corps officer with the U.S. Public Health Service and a senior epidemiologist with the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion (DHQP) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Center for Infectious Diseases (NCID). Her current work focuses on emergency response and preparedness for infectious diseases within the healthcare industry. Dr. Levy is a member of CDC’s Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Task Force and is currently coordinating DHQP’s SARS preparedness activities. She is also a member of CDC’s infection control team that is responding to the influenza outbreak of 2003-2004. Dr. Levy previously served at the CDC in NCID’s Division of Parasitic Diseases as the project officer for two interagency agreements with the EPA: to develop a national estimate of waterborne disease, and to conduct research on EPA’s Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List microorganisms. She was also responsible for overseeing CDC’s National Waterborne Diseases Outbreak Surveillance System. Dr. Levy joined the CDC in 1996 as an Epidemic Intelligence Service officer. She obtained a B.A. in psychology and an M.P.H. in epidemiology from the University of California, Los Angeles, and a Ph.D. in epidemiology from Johns Hopkins University. J. Vaun McArthur is senior scientist and professor of research at the University of Georgia Savannah River Ecology Laboratory and an adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Entomology at Clemson University. His current research interests include aquatic microbial ecology with emphasis on factors controlling the distribution and abundance of aquatic bacteria and/or their genes; indirect selection of antibiotic resistance traits by native bacteria; aquatic ecology; stream community metabolism; and macroinvertebrate ecology. He received his B.S. and M.S. in zoology from Brigham Young University and his Ph.D. in biology/ ecology from Kansas State University. Joan B. Rose is an international expert in water pollution microbiology and holds the Homer Nolin Endowed Chair for Water Research at Michigan State University. She recently completed service as the vice chair of the Water Science and Technology Board and also served on the Board on Life Sciences. Previous NRC service includes membership on the Committee on Wastewater Management for Coastal Urban Areas, Committee on Drinking Water Contaminants, and Committee on the Evaluation of the Viability of Augmenting Potable Water Supplies with Reclaimed Water. Dr. Rose was named one of the top 21 most influential people in water in the twenty-first century by Water Technology in 2000 and was awarded the 2001 Clarke Water Prize. She received a B.S. in microbiology from the University of Arizona, an M.S. in microbiology from the University of Wyoming, and a Ph.D. in microbiology form the University of Arizona.

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Indicators for Waterborne Pathogens Mark D. Sobsey is a professor of environmental microbiology in the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. His research interests lie in the occurrence, distribution, survival, fate, and risk assessment of enteric viruses and other microorganisms in water, soil, shellfish, and other foods. Dr. Sobsey directs the Environmental Virology and Microbiology Laboratory, a coastal North Carolina facility in which students and faculty conduct research into the microbiological quality of drinking water, bathing water, irrigation water, soil, coastal waters and shellfish. He received a B.S. in biology and an M.S. in hygiene from the University of Pittsburgh and a Ph.D. in environmental health sciences from the University of California, Berkeley. David R. Walt is the Robinson Professor of Chemistry at Tufts University and served as department chairman from 1989 through 1996. His areas of research involve the application of enzymes to organic synthesis, preparation of fiber-optic chemical sensors, immunochemistry, polymeric microstructures, artificial sensing systems, micro- and nanosensors, cell-based biosensors, and combinational chemistry. Some of his work in these areas is focused on the real-time detection of pathogens and toxic chemicals in the environment. Dr. Walt has served on several NRC Committees, including the Committee on Oceanic Carbon and the Panel on Carbon Dioxide. He chaired the NRC’s Panel on New Measurement Technologies for the Oceans. Dr. Walt received his B.S. in chemistry from the University of Michigan, and his Ph.D. in chemical biology from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Stephen B. Weisberg is executive director of the Southern California Coastal Water Research Project where he specializes in the design and implementation of environmental monitoring programs. Dr. Weisberg serves as chair of the Southern California Bight Regional Monitoring Steering Committee, which is responsible for developing regional integrated coastal monitoring for the Southern California Bight. He also serves on the Steering Committee for the U.S. Global Ocean Observing System, the Alliance for Coastal Technology Stakeholder’s Council, and the State of California’s Clean Beaches Task Force. Dr. Weisberg’s current research focuses on evaluating new technologies for enhancing beach water quality monitoring programs, including use of rapid measurement methods and source tracking technology. He received his B.S. in biology from the University of Michigan and his Ph.D. in biology from the University of Delaware. Marylynn V. Yates is professor of environmental microbiology in the Department of Environmental Sciences and associate executive vice chancellor at the University of California, Riverside. Dr. Yates conducts research in the area of

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Indicators for Waterborne Pathogens water and wastewater microbiology. Her current research focuses on contamination of water by human pathogenic microorganisms, especially through use of reclaimed water and biosolids; developing and improving methods to detect microorganisms in environmental samples; persistence of pathogenic microorganisms in the environment, including groundwater; and efficacy of water, wastewater, and biosolids treatment processes to inactivate pathogenic microorganisms. Dr. Yates previously served on the NRC Committee to Improve the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program. She received a B.S. in nursing from the University of Wisconsin, Madison; an M.S. in chemistry from the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology; and a Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Arizona. STAFF Mark C. Gibson is a program officer at the NRC’s Water Science and Technology Board (WSTB) and was responsible for the completion of this report. After joining the NRC in 1998, he directed the Committee on Drinking Water Contaminants, which released three reports, culminating with Classifying Drinking Water Contaminants for Regulatory Consideration in 2001. He is also directing the Committee on Water Quality Improvement for the Pittsburgh Region and the Committee on Assessing and Valuing the Services of Aquatic and Related Terrestrial Ecosystems for the WSTB. Mr. Gibson received his B.S. in biology from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and his M.S. in environmental science and policy in biology from George Mason University. Jennifer Kuzma was a senior program officer for the Board on Life Sciences until January 2003. Dr. Kuzma joined the NRC in January 1999 and served as study director for the NRC report, Genetically Modified Pest-Protected Plants (2000). She obtained her Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of Colorado at Boulder where she worked on the enzymology and molecular biology of isoprene biogenesis from plants and microorganisms. Seth H. Strongin is a project assistant with the NRC’s Board on Life Sciences. He joined the NRC in 2002 and has supported several NRC committees on projects related to bioterrorism, genomics, and agricultural biotechnology, including the 2002 report Countering Agricultural Bioterrorism. Mr. Strongin received his B.A. in biology, with a concentration in environmental sciences, from American University.

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