1992

A few schools in North Carolina, Michigan, Kansas, Oregon, and Virginia adopted GIS.

1992

NCGIA launched the Secondary Education Project (SEP) (http://www.ncgia.ucsb.edu/education/projects/SEP/sep.html) with the purpose of identifying existing GIS activities for secondary schools and creating new ones.

1992

Center for Image Processing in Education (CIPE) (http://www.cipe.com) was founded. It trains teachers and students in the use of data visualization tools and produces training manuals and curricula. Since its founding, CIPE has trained more than 3,500 teachers in image processing or GIS.

1992

Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) (http://www.esri.com) established a K–12 Schools and Libraries Division. The mission of the division is to help develop a spatially literate society using GIS.

1994

With the National Geographic Society (NGS), the National Science Foundation (NSF) sponsored the first Educational Applications of GIS conference, called EdGIS, on K–12 applications of GIS.

1994

Collaborative Visualization Project (CoVis) (http://www.covis.nwu.edu) was started by researchers in the Learning Sciences Center, School of Education, Northwestern University, to explore ways in which scientific understanding can be enhanced through visualization tools. Students and teachers met to use specialized software created by the project.

1994

World Watcher program (http://www.worldwatcher.northwestern.edu) was established. It grew out of CoVis and was directed by a senior researcher at CoVis. The program was designed to support student use of GIS in the science classroom. In 2003, it released a vector-based GIS software package for classroom use.

1994

NSF awarded a grant to the Technology in Education Research Consortium (TERC) (http://www.terc.edu) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, for a two-year project to assess the value of GIS in science classrooms. Project researchers concluded that GIS helps students discover relationships among variables, simpler GIS technology encourages open-ended explorations of data, and maps help students focus on the spatial nature of data.

1995

Environmental and Spatial Technology (EAST) (http://www2.eastproject.org/east), a collaborative of hundreds of U.S. high schools, was started. It uses problem-based learning strategies and technologies to stimulate student intellectual development. Using GIS, CAD, image analysis, programming, web development, and data visualization tools, EAST students focus on community issues and service learning. Annual student conferences in Arkansas and California highlight student products and provide teachers with time for training and collaboration.

1995

Visualizing Earth (VisEarth) (http://www.psu.edu) project, a collaboration between Pennsylvania State University’s Psychology and Geography Departments and TERC, involved middle school students in the analysis of remotely sensed and aerial photography data.

1996

NGS held the second EdGIS conference.

1996

The Berkeley Geo-Research Group (BGRG) (http://www.bgrg.com) created an ArcView GIS extension called Geodesy. The objective of Geodesy is to help students learn to interpret and analyze geographic information so they can answer questions about where they are, why they are there, and how they can enhance the quality of life in their community and the world. Designed for K–12 education, Geodesy is used in nearly 100 schools.

1997

Kansas Collaborative Research Network (KanCRN) (http://www.kancrn.org) was established. It is an Internet-based network of schools aimed to facilitate student research in the natural sciences through high-tech tools.



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