1997

NGS held the third EdGIS conference.

1998

University of Arizona began a three-year project SAGUARO (http://saguaro.geo.arizona.edu), which developed inquiry-based Earth sciences curricula for use in secondary schools.

1998

ESRI created its Virtual Campus (http://campus.esri.com) for learning about GIScience, GIS technology, and industry-specific applications of GIS. The campus now has more than 200,000 e-mail addresses of people from 185 countries signed into a course. K–12 teachers have found these courses less to their liking than other professional users partly because of course content and partly because of a lack of familiarity with the process of taking courses on-line. By contrast, K–12 students have demonstrated a facility for this style of learning.

1998

Education Division of the Missouri Botanical Garden (http://www.mobot.org/education/mapping/index.html), in partnership with the University of Missouri-St. Louis and St. Louis public schools, began efforts to incorporate GIS and related technologies in K–12 science and geography classrooms. The Missouri Botanical Garden offers summer classes on themes that use GIS for middle school students.

1999

World Resources Institute (WRI) (http://www.wri.org/enved/datascap.html) and ESRI published an ArcView GIS extension called DataScape, which enables secondary school students to explore WRI’s database of 450 variables for more than 160 countries. Its software allows inexperienced users to take advantage of the capabilities of GIS.

1999

ESRI, NGS, and the Association for Geographic Information initiated an annual GIS day (http://www.gisday.com/news.html). The purpose of GIS day is to educate students and the general public about GIS.

1999

ESRI K–12 Schools and Libraries Division established a core of K–12 educators skilled in GIS (http://www.esri.com/industries/k-12/index.html), and this group of teacher trainers in GIS for schools led to the establishment of the ESRI K–12 Authorized Teaching Program (ATP) (http://www.esri.com/industries/k-12/atp/index.html). ATP training is based on an inventory of what understanding is necessary for teachers to be able to help other teachers use ArcView and ArcVoyager in particular.

1999

Visualizations in Science and Mathematics (VISM) (http://www.isat.jmu.edu/common/projects/vism), a three-year NSF program started at the Integrated Science and Technology Center at James Madison University, holds summer workshops in the techniques and application of data visualization for math and science teachers. VISM is a summer program for middle and high school teachers interested in using data visualization technologies in the classroom.

1999

ESRI started the Community Atlas project (http://www.esri.com/industries/k-12/atlas/index.html). Using GIS, students work on community-related projects during the school year, culminating in a nationwide competition.

1999

Orton Family Foundation established the Community Mapping Program (http://www.communitymap.org), a place-based, project-based educational program bringing students, teachers, and community mentors together to address local needs and issues. The program works with GIS to enhance the discovery process.

2000

NSF’s three-year project, Virtual Immersion in Science Inquiry for Teachers (VISIT) (http://www.piedmontresearch.org/visit/index.html) started at Eastern Michigan University and the Piedmont Research Institute. VISIT was designed primarily to extend GIS teacher training into an on-line setting. By completing activities, teachers earned graduate credit.

2000

EdGIS conference, which was hosted by the California State University, San Bernardino, was held to address the growth in GIS industry, education, and on-line digital libraries.

2000

ESRI established GIS state site licenses for schools. In the United States, Montana obtained



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement