Appendix B
Committee Member Biographies

DARRELL R. BRANSCOME, Chair, is a senior systems engineer in the Applied Technology Group at Science Applications International Corporation. He retired from NASA following a career in space access, exploration, and atmospheric sciences. His last position at NASA was as director of the Space Access and Exploration Programs Office at NASA Langley Research Center. In this position he was responsible for formulating and implementing Langley's space access and exploration programs, including efforts supporting the second generation program, Advanced Space Transportation, shuttle evolution, and the Hyper-X flight demonstration program. Mr. Branscome also served as staff director for the U.S. House of Representatives Subcommittee on Space Science and Applications, bringing the perspective of Congress to the steering committee. He was awarded both B.S. and M.S. degrees in mechanical engineering from Virginia Polytechnic and State University. Honors include AIAA Fellow and the NASA Exceptional Service and Outstanding Leadership Medals.

STEVEN GOREVAN is chairman of engineering management, design, and systems engineering at Honeybee Robotics, a small company involved in both space and terrestrial robotics. He is project manager on the development and implementation of advanced automated systems for use in surface-based planetary exploration. He serves as coinvestigator and project manager for the Mars Exploration Rover 2003 rock abrasion tool design and development and has served as project manager of several NASA small business grants and other robotic mining and telerobotic operations for NASA. He was the robotic drill project manager for NASA's Mars Surveyor rover. Mr. Gorevan has also served as a member of several government councils and committees on space exploration, including the NASA Solar System Roadmap Committee of 1998.

MOLLY K. MACAULEY is a senior fellow with Resources for the Future (RFF), Washington, D.C. She has been director of academic programs at RFF since 1996. Since 1983 Dr. Macauley's research at RFF has included several diverse areas: public finance, energy economics, the value of information, and economics and policy issues of outer space. Recent projects include: assessing the value of technology transfer and satellite remote sensing, the cost-effectiveness of a faster, better, cheaper space program, and the development of public policy and performance measures for NASA's New Millennium Program. Dr. Macauley has been a visiting professor at Johns Hopkins University, Department of Economics. She has testified before Congress on the Commercial Space Act of 1997, the Omnibus Space Commercialization Act of 1996, the Space Business Incentives Act of 1996, and space commercialization. Dr. Macauley has served on many national committees and panels, including the congressionally mandated Economic Study of Space Solar Power (chair), the National Research Council's Helium Reserve Committee, the Steering Group on Space Applications and Commercialization, and the Committee on Space Solar Power, among others. She has served on the board of directors



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Stepping-Stones to the Future of Space Exploration: A Workshop Report Appendix B Committee Member Biographies DARRELL R. BRANSCOME, Chair, is a senior systems engineer in the Applied Technology Group at Science Applications International Corporation. He retired from NASA following a career in space access, exploration, and atmospheric sciences. His last position at NASA was as director of the Space Access and Exploration Programs Office at NASA Langley Research Center. In this position he was responsible for formulating and implementing Langley's space access and exploration programs, including efforts supporting the second generation program, Advanced Space Transportation, shuttle evolution, and the Hyper-X flight demonstration program. Mr. Branscome also served as staff director for the U.S. House of Representatives Subcommittee on Space Science and Applications, bringing the perspective of Congress to the steering committee. He was awarded both B.S. and M.S. degrees in mechanical engineering from Virginia Polytechnic and State University. Honors include AIAA Fellow and the NASA Exceptional Service and Outstanding Leadership Medals. STEVEN GOREVAN is chairman of engineering management, design, and systems engineering at Honeybee Robotics, a small company involved in both space and terrestrial robotics. He is project manager on the development and implementation of advanced automated systems for use in surface-based planetary exploration. He serves as coinvestigator and project manager for the Mars Exploration Rover 2003 rock abrasion tool design and development and has served as project manager of several NASA small business grants and other robotic mining and telerobotic operations for NASA. He was the robotic drill project manager for NASA's Mars Surveyor rover. Mr. Gorevan has also served as a member of several government councils and committees on space exploration, including the NASA Solar System Roadmap Committee of 1998. MOLLY K. MACAULEY is a senior fellow with Resources for the Future (RFF), Washington, D.C. She has been director of academic programs at RFF since 1996. Since 1983 Dr. Macauley's research at RFF has included several diverse areas: public finance, energy economics, the value of information, and economics and policy issues of outer space. Recent projects include: assessing the value of technology transfer and satellite remote sensing, the cost-effectiveness of a faster, better, cheaper space program, and the development of public policy and performance measures for NASA's New Millennium Program. Dr. Macauley has been a visiting professor at Johns Hopkins University, Department of Economics. She has testified before Congress on the Commercial Space Act of 1997, the Omnibus Space Commercialization Act of 1996, the Space Business Incentives Act of 1996, and space commercialization. Dr. Macauley has served on many national committees and panels, including the congressionally mandated Economic Study of Space Solar Power (chair), the National Research Council's Helium Reserve Committee, the Steering Group on Space Applications and Commercialization, and the Committee on Space Solar Power, among others. She has served on the board of directors

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Stepping-Stones to the Future of Space Exploration: A Workshop Report of Women in Aerospace and as president of the board of advisors of the Thomas Jefferson Public Policy Program at the College of William and Mary. She has recently completed a new report on the government's role in research and development, with emphasis on science and technology. DAVA J. NEWMAN is professor of aeronautics and astronautics and engineering systems at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and a MacVicar Faculty Fellow. In addition to these responsibilities, she was recently named director of the Technology and Policy Program at MIT. Her expertise is in multidisciplinary research that combines aerospace biomedical engineering, human-in-the-loop modeling, biomechanics, human interface technology, life sciences, systems analysis, design, and policy. Dr. Newman's research studies are carried out through spaceflight experiments, ground-based simulations, and mathematical modeling. Current research efforts include advanced space suit design, dynamics and control of astronaut motion, mission analysis, and engineering systems design and policy analysis. She also has ongoing efforts in assistive technologies to augment human locomotion here on Earth. Dr. Newman is the author of Interactive Aerospace Engineering and Design, an introductory engineering textbook with accompanying CD-ROM, published by McGraw-Hill, Inc., in 2002. She has also published more than 100 papers in journals and refereed conferences. Dr. Newman received her B.S. degree from the University of Notre Dame and S.M. degrees from MIT's Technology and Policy Program and the department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. She serves as a member of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board and has also served as a member of the NRC Committee on Advanced Technology for Human Support in Space, the Committee for the Assessment of NASA’s Space Solar Power Investment and the Committee on Engineering Challenges to the Long-Term Operation of the International Space Station. ERIC E. RICE president, CEO, and chairman of Orbital Technologies Inc. (ORBITEC), is currently leading the development of revolutionary microgravity research systems for spaceflight; advanced high-energy-density propellant-based propulsion engines for future space transport systems and space platforms; in situ propellant processing on the Moon and Mars; an innovative cryogenic fluid management technology; and advanced combustors for rocket engines. ORBITEC is a small aerospace business very involved in the government's Small Business Innovative Research Awards. Dr. Rice holds a Ph.D. in aeronautical and astronautical engineering from the Ohio State University and a B.S. in chemistry and physics from the University of Wisconsin. Dr. Rice is a fellow of the American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA); founder and 2002-2004 chairman of the AIAA Space Colonization Technical Committee; 1992 chairman and current member, AIAA Space Transportation Technical Committee; 1996-1997 chairman and past member, AIAA Microgravity and Space Processes Technical Committee; past member AIAA Space Systems Technical Committee; past member, AIAA Nuclear and Future Flight Propulsion Technical Committee; member, National Space Society; member, American Astronautical Society; named a Distinguished Alumnus of the Ohio State University; chairman, Wisconsin Space Institute; and associate director, Industry Programs Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium.

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Stepping-Stones to the Future of Space Exploration: A Workshop Report CHARLES R. TRIMBLE is one of the founders and was president and CEO of Trimble Navigation, guiding it to its dominant role in the Global Positioning System information technology market. Before founding Trimble, Mr. Trimble was manager of integrated circuit research and development at Hewlett-Packard's Santa Clara Division. During his tenure at HP, he was recognized for developing commercial advances in efficient signal processing, high-speed analog-to-digital converters, and digital time measurement techniques to the picosecond level. Mr. Trimble received his B.S. degree in engineering physics, with honors, in 1963, and his M.S. degree in electrical engineering, in 1964, from the California Institute of Technology. He was a member of the Vice President's Space Advisory Board's task group on the future of U.S. space industrial base as a representative of the National Space Council. In September 1994, Mr. Trimble was honored with the Piper General Aviation award from the AIAA for pioneering the manufacture and application of affordable GPS. He recently served on the NRC Committee on Government-Industry Partnerships for the Development of New Technologies and currently serves on the NRC Committee on Capitalizing on Science, Technology, and Innovation: An Assessment of the Small Business Innovation Research Program. Mr. Trimble is a member of the NAE, the Council on Foreign Robotics, and the California Institute of Technology board of trustees. CHARLES D. WALKER was the first noncareer, industry-sponsored astronaut, serving as payload specialist on three space shuttle missions. On these flights, Mr. Walker operated equipment designed by McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company for its electrophoresis biotechnology commercialization program (EOS) device. As chief test engineer of the EOS program, Mr. Walker was extensively involved with the laboratory development and spaceflight test of the EOS device. He currently serves in government relations and was previously the senior specialist for Advanced Space Programs Development at the Boeing Company (McDonnell Douglas was acquired by Boeing in 1997). His initial assignment was that of test engineer on the aft propulsion subsystem for the space shuttle orbiters. Mr. Walker has been a member of an independent national space policy review project and served on the former National Research Council Space Applications Board. He has also served on several government and university research center panels. Mr. Walker is currently a board director of the Challenger Center for Space Science Education. Mr. Walker received his undergraduate degree in aeronautical and astronautical engineering from Purdue University in 1971. Prior to joining McDonnell Douglas, he was a project engineer with the Naval Sea Systems Command working on computer-controlled manufacturing systems, a design engineer for Bendix Aerospace and, before that, an engineering technician and a firefighter with the U.S. Forest Service.