Appendix A
Agenda

A National Academies Workshop

DIRECT AND INDIRECT HUMAN CONTRIBUTIONS TO TERRESTRIAL GREENHOUSE GAS FLUXES

The National Academies

Keck Center, Room 100

500 Fifth St., NW

Washington, DC 20001

September, 23–24, 2003

8:00 am to 5:30 pm

September 24th, 2003

Keck Center, Room 100

8:00 a.m.

Breakfast—Room 100

8:30

Introductory Remarks: Goals and Statement of Work, Definitions, Product of Workshop

Michael Prather, Chair

8:45

Sponsor Perspective

William Hohenstein, USDA Global Change Program Office



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OCR for page 65
Direct and Indirect Human Contributions: To Terrestrial Carbon Fluxes - A Workshop Summary Appendix A Agenda A National Academies Workshop DIRECT AND INDIRECT HUMAN CONTRIBUTIONS TO TERRESTRIAL GREENHOUSE GAS FLUXES The National Academies Keck Center, Room 100 500 Fifth St., NW Washington, DC 20001 September, 23–24, 2003 8:00 am to 5:30 pm September 24th, 2003 Keck Center, Room 100 8:00 a.m. Breakfast—Room 100 8:30 Introductory Remarks: Goals and Statement of Work, Definitions, Product of Workshop Michael Prather, Chair 8:45 Sponsor Perspective William Hohenstein, USDA Global Change Program Office

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Direct and Indirect Human Contributions: To Terrestrial Carbon Fluxes - A Workshop Summary 9:10 Terrestrial Ecosystems, Carbon Stocks, and the UNFCCC Bob Watson, World Bank 9:40 Discussion Ian Roy Noble, World Bank 10:30 Break 11:00 National and International Greenhouse Gas Inventory System: Technical Requirements, Project Accounting, and Uncertainty Dina Kruger, EPA 11:30 Discussion John Kimble, USDA/Natural Resources Conservation Service 12:00 p.m. Lunch—Room 100 1:30 Consideration of Spatial Scales and Timescales in Assessing Carbon Stocks and Fluxes George Hurtt, University of New Hampshire 1:50 Separating Direct Human-Induced Changes from Other Effects Jen Jenkins, University of Vermont (presented by Richard Birdsey) 2:10 Discussion Ann Camp, Yale University 2:30 Break 3:00 Estimates of Carbon Stocks and Fluxes from Land Use Change Christine Goodale, Woods Hole Research Center 3:30 Estimates of Carbon Stocks and Fluxes from Forestry Activities Evan DeLucia, University of Illinois Urbana-Champagne 3:50 Estimates of Carbon Stocks and Fluxes from Agricultural Activities Cesar Izaurralde, Battelle, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 4:20 Discussion Perry Hagenstein 4:50 Summary of Key Issues, General Discussion Richard Houghton, Woods Hole Research Center 5:30 Wrap-up and Adjourn for the Day Michael Prather, Chair

OCR for page 65
Direct and Indirect Human Contributions: To Terrestrial Carbon Fluxes - A Workshop Summary September 24, 2003 Keck Center, Room 201 8:00 a.m. Breakfast—Room 208 8:30 Carbon Cycle—Overview of CO2 and CH4 cycles William Schlesinger, Duke University 9:00 Indirect Human-Induced Effects (CO2 fertilization, nitrogen, climate change) Dennis Ojima, Colorado State University 9:30 Natural Effects (fire, pests, and climate variability) Nate Stephenson, USGS West Ecological Research Center, Sequoia and Kings Canyon 10:00 Discussion Ruth Defries, University of Maryland 10:20 Break 10:40 Efficacy and Longevity of Varying Carbon Storage Practices Tristram West, Oak Ridge National Laboratory 11:10 Implications for Indirect and Natural Effects on National and International Greenhouse Gas Inventories Chris Field, Carnegie Institution 11:40 What Research is Needed to Enable Partitioning of Direct and Indirect Effects? Jim Randerson, University of California, Irvine 12:10 p.m. Discussion Jason Hamilton, Ithaca College 12:30 Lunch—Room 208 1:30 Land Succession Effects (historical forest practices, agriculture to forests) Chris Potter, NASA Ames 2:00 U.S. Forests: Inventories, Ecosystem Models, and Other Approaches Linda Heath, USDA 2:30 Tropical Forests: Inventories, Ecosystem Models, and Other Approaches Sandra Brown, Winrock International 3:00 Discussion Ian Roy Noble, World Bank

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Direct and Indirect Human Contributions: To Terrestrial Carbon Fluxes - A Workshop Summary 3:20 Break 3:40 What Data Resolution for Direct and Indirect Effects? When Can This Be done? Richard Birdsey, USDA Forest Service 4:10 Issues of Scientific Methodology—Lessons from the UNFCCC Brazil Proposal Michael Prather, University of California, Irvine 4:20 Current State of the Science Regarding Partitioning of Net Carbon Fluxes Eric Sundquist 5:20 Anticipated Future Capability (Climate Change Science Program/Water Resources Applications Project) to Quantify Specific Processes Bryan Hannegan, Council on Environmental Quality 6:20 Wrap-up and Our Report 6:30 Adjourn