Appendix B
ACRONYMS AND GLOSSARY

Acronyms


CDC

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

CHER-CAP

Community Hazards Emergency Response Capability Assurance Program

CSEPP

Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program


DHHS

Department of Health and Human Services

DHS

Department of Homeland Security


EMS

Emergency Medical Services

Epi-Aid

Epidemic Assistance Investigation


FBI

Federal Bureau of Investigations

FEMA

Federal Emergency Management Agency


GAO

General Accounting Office


HAN

Health Alert Network

HSC

Homeland Security Council

HSAC

Homeland Security Advisory Council

HRSA

Health Resources and Services Administration

HSEEP

Homeland Security Exercise Evaluation Program


ICS

Incident Command System


LLIS

Lessons Learned Information Sharing (www.llis.org)


MIPT

Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism


ODP

Office of Domestic Preparedness


PCC

Policy Coordination Committee (of the HSC)


REP

Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program


WMD

Weapons of Mass Destruction

Glossary


All-hazards:

generally contrasted with “agent-specific,” refers to a broad preparedness and response approach to all possible hazards to population health and safety, whether the complete range of known disasters, or specifically the complete range of public health disasters (from naturally-occurring to deliberately introduced)


Disaster:

phenomena caused by natural, technological, or deliberate causes. Term is sometimes used interchangeably with emergency, although they are not only quantitatively but also qualitatively different. A key difference is that while emergencies call upon largely local resources and response, disasters are sufficient magnitude to require external resources and personnel for response and recovery (Mothershead, 2003).



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Review of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Smallpox Vaccination Program Implementation: Letter Report # 6 Appendix B ACRONYMS AND GLOSSARY Acronyms CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CHER-CAP Community Hazards Emergency Response Capability Assurance Program CSEPP Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program DHHS Department of Health and Human Services DHS Department of Homeland Security EMS Emergency Medical Services Epi-Aid Epidemic Assistance Investigation FBI Federal Bureau of Investigations FEMA Federal Emergency Management Agency GAO General Accounting Office HAN Health Alert Network HSC Homeland Security Council HSAC Homeland Security Advisory Council HRSA Health Resources and Services Administration HSEEP Homeland Security Exercise Evaluation Program ICS Incident Command System LLIS Lessons Learned Information Sharing (www.llis.org) MIPT Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism ODP Office of Domestic Preparedness PCC Policy Coordination Committee (of the HSC) REP Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program WMD Weapons of Mass Destruction Glossary All-hazards: generally contrasted with “agent-specific,” refers to a broad preparedness and response approach to all possible hazards to population health and safety, whether the complete range of known disasters, or specifically the complete range of public health disasters (from naturally-occurring to deliberately introduced) Disaster: phenomena caused by natural, technological, or deliberate causes. Term is sometimes used interchangeably with emergency, although they are not only quantitatively but also qualitatively different. A key difference is that while emergencies call upon largely local resources and response, disasters are sufficient magnitude to require external resources and personnel for response and recovery (Mothershead, 2003).

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Review of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Smallpox Vaccination Program Implementation: Letter Report # 6 Drill: similar to exercises, but more narrowly focused activities used for training, testing, and refining capacities, and frequently involving a specific area of preparedness within only one agency rather than more complex processes and relationships at an interagency level. Emergency manager: a title used for increasingly professionalized personnel in local or state government who are charged with coordinating or overseeing the jurisdiction’s multi-agency response to an emergency or disaster. Emergency responder/first responder/traditional emergency responder: term refers a set of disciplines and responsibilities, including, but not limited to Emergency Medical Services [EMS], fire, law enforcement, hazardous materials specialists, etc. Personnel in such agencies and the practitioners of such disciplines prepare for emergencies and disasters and are responsible for carrying out response when emergencies and disasters occur. Emergency response: refers to an array of activities conducted by multiple jurisdictions, agencies, and authorities in response to emergencies and disasters. For the sake of simplicity, this report uses the terms “emergency and disaster management” or “emergency and disaster preparedness and response” interchangeably to describe the field of traditional first responders. Exercise: describes a range of activities that involve enacting a response to a mock emergency or disaster.