Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Workshop Speakers

COMMITTEE MEMBERS AND STAFF

Lauress L. Wise (Chair) is president of the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO). His research interests focus on issues related to testing and test use policy. He has served on the National Academy of Education’s Panel for the Evaluation of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Trial State Assessment, as co-principal investigator on the National Research Council’s (NRC) study to evaluate voluntary national tests, and as a member of the Committee on the Evaluation of National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). He has been active on the NRC’s Board on Testing and Assessment, the Committee on Reporting Results for Accommodated Test Takers: Policy and Technical Considerations, and the Committee on the Evaluation of the Voluntary National Tests, Year 2. At HumRRO, he is currently directing an evaluation of California’s high school graduation test and a project to provide quality assurance for NAEP. Prior to joining HumRRO, he directed research and development on the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) for the U.S. Department of Defense. He has a Ph.D. in mathematical psychology from the University of California, Berkeley.

Linda Chinnia is an educator with the Baltimore City Public School System. During a 32-year career, she has served as an early childhood teacher, a senior teacher, a curriculum specialist, an assistant principal, a principal,



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Strengthening Peer Review in Federal Agencies that Support Education Research Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Workshop Speakers COMMITTEE MEMBERS AND STAFF Lauress L. Wise (Chair) is president of the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO). His research interests focus on issues related to testing and test use policy. He has served on the National Academy of Education’s Panel for the Evaluation of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Trial State Assessment, as co-principal investigator on the National Research Council’s (NRC) study to evaluate voluntary national tests, and as a member of the Committee on the Evaluation of National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). He has been active on the NRC’s Board on Testing and Assessment, the Committee on Reporting Results for Accommodated Test Takers: Policy and Technical Considerations, and the Committee on the Evaluation of the Voluntary National Tests, Year 2. At HumRRO, he is currently directing an evaluation of California’s high school graduation test and a project to provide quality assurance for NAEP. Prior to joining HumRRO, he directed research and development on the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) for the U.S. Department of Defense. He has a Ph.D. in mathematical psychology from the University of California, Berkeley. Linda Chinnia is an educator with the Baltimore City Public School System. During a 32-year career, she has served as an early childhood teacher, a senior teacher, a curriculum specialist, an assistant principal, a principal,

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Strengthening Peer Review in Federal Agencies that Support Education Research and the director of elementary school improvement. Currently she serves as an area academic officer, supervising 35 elementary and K-8 schools. She has been an adjunct instructor at the Baltimore City Community College, Coppin State College, Towson University, and Johns Hopkins University. She has taught courses in early childhood education, elementary education, and educational supervision and leadership. She has B.A. and M.A. degrees from Towson University. Kay Dickersin is a professor at the Brown University School of Medicine. She is also director of the U.S. Cochrane Center, one of 14 centers world-wide participating in The Cochrane Collaboration, which aims to help people make well-informed decisions about health by preparing, maintaining, and promoting the accessibility of systematic reviews of available evidence on the benefits and risks of health care. Her areas of interest include publication bias, women’s health, and the development and utilization of methods for the evaluation of medical care and its effectiveness. She was a member of the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Reimbursement of Routine Patient Care Costs for Medicare Patients Enrolled in Clinical Trials, the Committee on Defense Women’s Health Research, and the Committee to Review the Department of Defense’s Breast Cancer Research Program. She has an M.S. in zoology, specializing in cell biology, from the University of California, Berkeley, and a Ph.D. in epidemiology from Johns Hopkins University’s School of Hygiene and Public Health. Margaret Eisenhart is professor of educational anthropology and research methodology and director of graduate studies in the School of Education, University of Colorado, Boulder. Previously she was a member of the College of Education at Virginia Tech. Her research and publications have focused on two topics: what young people learn about race, gender, and academic content in and around schools; and applications of ethnographic research methods in educational research. She is coauthor of three books as well as numerous articles and chapters. She was a member of the NRC’s Committee on Scientific Principles in Education Research. She has a Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Karen Falkenberg is a lecturer in the Division of Educational Studies at Emory University. She is also the president of the Education Division of Concept Catalysts, a consulting company that has a specialization in science, mathematics, and engineering education reform. She works both na-

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Strengthening Peer Review in Federal Agencies that Support Education Research tionally and internationally. She was the program manager for the National Science Foundation funded local systemic change initiative in Atlanta called the Elementary Science Education Partners Program, and has been a mentor for SERC@SERVE’s Technical Assistance Academy for Mathematics and Science and for the WestEd National Academy for Science and Mathematics Education Leadership. She also served on the National Academy of Engineering’s Committee for Technological Literacy. Earlier, she was a high school teacher of science, mathematics, and engineering and was featured as a classroom teacher in case studies of prominent U.S. innovations in science, math, and technology education. Before she became an educator, she worked as a research engineer. She has a Ph.D. from Emory University. Jack McFarlin Fletcher is a professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center and associate director of the Center for Academic and Reading Skills. For the past 20 years, as a child neuropsychologist, he has conducted research on many aspects of the development of reading, language, and other cognitive skills in children. He has worked extensively on issues related to learning and attention problems, including definition and classification, neurobiological correlates, intervention, and most recently on the development of literacy skills in Spanish-speaking and bilingual children. He chaired the National Institute for Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Mental Retardation/Developmental Disabilities study section and is a former member of the NICHD Maternal and Child Health study section. He recently served on the President’s Commission on Excellence in Special Education and is a member of the NICHD National Advisory Council. He was a member of the NRC’s Committee on Scientific Principles in Education Research. He has a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Florida. Robert E. Floden is a professor of teacher education, measurement and quantitative methods, and educational policy and is the director of the Institute for Research on Teaching and Learning at Michigan State University. He has written on a range of topics in philosophy, statistics, psychology, program evaluation, research on teaching, and research on teacher education. His current research examines the preparation of mathematics teachers and the development of leaders in mathematics and science education. He has a Ph.D. from Stanford University.

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Strengthening Peer Review in Federal Agencies that Support Education Research Ernest M. Henley is a professor emeritus of physics at the University of Washington. He has served as the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Washington and as director and associate director of its Institute for Nuclear Theory. The focus of his work has been with space-time symmetries, the connection of quark-gluons to nucleons-mesons, and the changes that occur to hadrons when placed in a nuclear medium; at present he is working in the area of cosmology. He was elected to membership in the National Academy of Sciences in 1979 and served as chair of its Physics Section from 1998 to 2001. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and served as president of the American Physical Society and as a member of the U.S Liaison Committee for the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics. He has a Ph.D. in physics from the University of California, Berkeley. Vinetta C. Jones is an educational psychologist and the dean of the School of Education at Howard University. During a 30-year career in public education, she has maintained a singular focus: developing and supporting professionals and creating institutional environments that develop the potential of all students to achieve high levels of academic excellence, especially those who have been traditionally underserved by the public education system. She has written and lectured widely on issues related to the education of diverse populations, especially in the areas of academic tracking, the power of teacher expectations, and the role of mathematics as a critical factor in opening pathways to success for minority and poor students. She served for eight years as executive director of EQUITY 2000 at the College Board, where she led one of the largest and most successful education reform programs in the country. She has served on numerous boards and national committees and was inducted into the Education Hall of Fame by the National Alliance of Black School Educators in 2000. She has a B.A. from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. in educational psychology from the University of California, Berkeley. Brian W. Junker is professor of statistics at Carnegie Mellon University. His research interests include the statistical foundations of latent variable models for measurement, as well as applications of latent variable modeling in the design and analysis of standardized tests, small-scale experiments in psychology and psychiatry, and large-scale educational surveys such as the National Assessment of Educational Progress. He is a fellow of the Institute

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Strengthening Peer Review in Federal Agencies that Support Education Research of Mathematical Statistics, a member of the board of trustees and the editorial council of the Psychometric Society, and an associate editor and editorelect of Psychometrika. He served on the NRC’s Committee on Embedding Common Test Items in State and District Assessments. He is currently a member of the Design and Analysis Committee for the National Assessment of Educational Progress. He has a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Illinois. David Klahr is a professor and former head of the Department of Psychology at Carnegie Mellon University. His current research focuses on cognitive development, scientific reasoning, and cognitively based instructional interventions in early science education. His earlier work addressed cognitive processes in such diverse areas as voting behavior, college admissions, consumer choice, peer review, and problem solving. He pioneered the application of information-processing analysis to questions of cognitive development and formulated the first computational models to account for children’s thinking processes. He was a member of the NRC’s Committee on the Foundations of Assessment. He has a Ph.D. in organizations and social behavior from Carnegie Mellon University. Ellen Condliffe Lagemann is an education historian and dean of the Harvard Graduate School of Education. She has been a professor of history and education at New York University, taught for 16 years at Teachers College at Columbia University, and served as the president of the Spencer Foundation and the National Academy of Education. She was a member of the NRC’s Committee on Scientific Principles in Educational Research. She has an undergraduate degree from Smith College, an M.A. in social studies from Teachers College, and a Ph.D. in history and education from Columbia University. Barbara Schneider is professor of sociology at the University of Chicago. She is a co-director of the Alfred P. Sloan Center on Parents, Children and Work and the director of the Data Research and Development Center, a new $6 million initiative from Interagency Education Research Initiative. Her current interests include how social contexts, primarily schools and families, influence individuals’ interests and actions. She has a Ph.D. from Northwestern University. Joseph Tobin is a professor in the College of Education at Arizona State

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Strengthening Peer Review in Federal Agencies that Support Education Research University. Previously he served as a professor in the College of Education at the University of Hawaii. His research interests include educational ethnography, Japanese culture and education, visual anthropology, early childhood education, and children and the media. He was a member of the NRC’s Board on International Comparative Studies in Education. He has a Ph.D. in human development from the University of Chicago. Lisa Towne (Study Director) is a senior program officer in the NRC’s Center for Education and adjunct instructor of quantitative methods at Georgetown University’s Public Policy Institute. She has also worked for the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and the U.S. Department of Education Planning and Evaluation Service. She has an M.P.P. from Georgetown University. Tina Winters (Research Associate) is a research associate in the NRC’s Center for Education. Over the past 10 years, she has worked on a wide variety of education studies at the NRC and has provided assistance for several reports, including Scientific Research in Education, Knowing What Students Know, and the National Science Education Standards. WORKSHOP SPEAKERS Diane August is currently an independent consultant as well as a senior research scientist at the Center for Applied Linguistics in Washington, DC. As an educational consultant, she has worked in the areas of literacy, program improvement, evaluation and testing, and federal and state education policy. She has a Ph.D. in education from Stanford University. Hilda Borko is a professor of education and chair of educational psychology at the School of Education, University of Colorado, Boulder. Her research explores teacher cognition and the process of learning to teach, with an emphasis on changes in novice and experienced teachers’ knowledge and beliefs about teaching, learning, and assessment, and their classroom practices. She has a Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles. Steven Breckler is program director for social psychology at the National Science Foundation (NSF). Since 1995 he has been active in a number of Foundation-wide initiatives, including Learning and Intelligent Systems (LIS), Knowledge and Distributed Intelligence (KDI), the Interagency Edu-

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Strengthening Peer Review in Federal Agencies that Support Education Research cation Research Initiative (IERI), and the Children’s Research Initiative (CRI). He is currently working to develop a new program to fund Centers for the Science of Learning. He has a Ph.D. from Ohio State University. Susan Chipman manages the cognitive science program at the U.S. Office of Naval Research, as well as more applied programs in advanced training technology. Previously, she was assistant director of the National Institute of Education, where she was responsible for managing research programs in mathematics education, cognitive development, computers and education, and social influences on learning and development. She has an A.B. in mathematics and M.B.A., A.M., and Ph.D. degrees (the latter in experimental psychology) from Harvard University. Domenic V. Cicchetti is a senior research scientist of epidemiology and public health in biometry at Yale University School of Medicine. As a psychological methodologist and research collaborator, he has made numerous biostatistical contributions to the development of major clinical instruments in behavioral science and medicine, as well as to the application of state-of-the-art techniques for assessing their psychometric properties. He has B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Connecticut. Louis Danielson is director of the Research to Practice Division in the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), U.S. Department of Education. In the field of special education, he has been involved in programs that improve results for students with disabilities. For the past 26 years, he has held leadership roles in OSEP and is currently responsible for the discretionary grants program, including research, technical assistance and dissemination, personnel preparation, technology, and parent training priorities, national evaluation activities, and other major policy-related studies. He has a Ph.D. in educational psychology from Pennsylvania State University. Kenneth Dodge directs the Center for Child and Family Policy at Duke University. He has studied children’s social development and is particularly interested in how chronic violent behavior develops, how it can be prevented in high-risk children, and how communities can implement policies to prevent violence. He has a B.A. from Northwestern University and a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Duke University.

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Strengthening Peer Review in Federal Agencies that Support Education Research Edward Hackett is a professor in the Department of Sociology at Arizona State University. He has been an NSF program officer and for 12 years a professor in the Department of Science and Technology Studies at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He has written about peer review, the scientific career, the responsible conduct of research, and the organization and behavior of research groups in science and engineering. He has a B.A. from Colgate University and a Ph.D. from Cornell University. Milton D. Hakel is the Ohio Board of Regents eminent scholar in industrial and organizational psychology at Bowling Green State University. His research focuses on leadership development, performance appraisal, job analysis and compensation, and employee selection. He is a member of the NRC Board on Testing and Assessment. He has a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Minnesota. Teresa Levitin is director of the Office of Extramural Affairs at the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). Her office houses study sections that review NIDA’s medications development, treatment, and services research as well as the agency’s career development centers and other special mechanisms. She works with the scientific community to inform them about pertinent policies and procedures as well as to teach research grantwriting skills. She has a Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Penelope Peterson is Eleanor R. Baldwin professor and dean of the School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern University. Her research interests are literacy and mathematics teaching and learning, student and teacher learning in reform contexts, and educational research, policy, and practice. Since becoming dean, she has led the school in bringing theory and research together with practice to improve learning and teaching in the local educational context. She has a B.S. in psychology and philosophy from Iowa State University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in psychological studies in education from Stanford University. Edward Redish is professor of physics at the University of Maryland, College Park. His research in nuclear theory emphasizes the theory of reactions and the quantum few-body problem. As a nuclear theorist, he served on the National Nuclear Science Advisory Committee and served as chair of the Program Committee for the Indiana Cyclotron. Since 1982 he has been

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Strengthening Peer Review in Federal Agencies that Support Education Research actively involved in the subject of physics education using the computer. He was founder and co-principal investigator of the Maryland University Project in Physics Education and Technology (CUPLE). He is the editor of the physics education supplement to the American Journal of Physics. He has an undergraduate degree from Princeton University and a Ph.D. in theoretical nuclear physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Finbarr Sloane is program manager for the Interagency Education Research Initiative at the National Science Foundation. In addition to this work, he also assumes the role of program director in the Research on Learning and Education program housed in the Division of Research, Evaluation and Communication. His responsibilities there include oversight of the international study of mathematics and science currently being conducted in 47 countries. He has also sponsored and has oversight over promising technology solutions to teaching and learning in mathematics and science. Sloane has a B.A. in mathematics and sociology from the University College Cork and an M.B.A. from the University of Chicago. Brent B. Stanfield is the deputy director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Center for Scientific Review. Within NIH, he has held positions in the Office of Science Policy, the Division of Intramural Research in the National Institute on Mental Health (NIMH), the Center for Scientific Review (where he helped implement the reorganization of the study sections that review neuroscience grant applications), and the NIMH Office of Science Policy and Program Planning. He has a B.S. in biological sciences from the University of California, Irvine and a Ph.D. in neurobiology from Washington University, St. Louis. Robert J. Sternberg is IBM professor of psychology and education and director of the Center for the Psychology of Abilities, Competencies, and Expertise at Yale University. The center is dedicated to theory, research, practice, and policy advancing the notion of intelligence as developing expertise—that is, as a construct that is modifiable and capable, to some extent, of development throughout the life span. The central focus of his research is on intelligence, creativity, and wisdom, and he also has studied love and close relationships as well as hate. He has a B.A. (summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa, ) from Yale University and a Ph.D. from Stanford University.

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Strengthening Peer Review in Federal Agencies that Support Education Research Grover J. (Russ) Whitehurst is the first director of the Institute of Education Sciences, which was established in the U.S. Department of Education by the Education Sciences Reform Act of 2002. The institute conducts, supports, and disseminates research on education practices that improve academic achievement, statistics on the condition of education in the United States, and evaluations of the effectiveness of federal and other education programs. As director, Whitehurst administers the institute, coordinates its work with that of other federal agencies, and advises the secretary on research, evaluation, and statistics. He has an undergraduate degree from East Carolina University and a Ph.D. in experimental child psychology from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

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Strengthening Peer Review in Federal Agencies that Support Education Research