Appendixes



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Retooling Manufacturing: Bridging Design, Materials, and Production Appendixes

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Retooling Manufacturing: Bridging Design, Materials, and Production Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members R. Byron Pipes (Chair), NAE, is Goodyear Tire and Rubber Professor of Polymer Engineering at the University of Akron. He was elected to the NAE for interdisciplinary leadership in composite materials research and for development of an exemplary model of university, industrial, and governmental interactions in research and education. He served as the president, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute from 1993 to 1998. As Distinguished Visiting Scholar at the College of William and Mary, he pursued research at the NASA Langley Research Center in the field of carbon nanotechnology during 1999 to 2001. He was provost and vice president for academic affairs at the University of Delaware from 1991 to 1993 and served as dean of the College of Engineering and director of the Center for Composite Materials during 1977 to 1991 at the same institution. Dr. Pipes was elected to the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences in 1993. He is the author of more than 100 archival publications, including four books, and has served on the editorial boards of four journals in his field. Dr. Pipes has served on a number of National Research Council committees as both member and chair and served two terms on the National Materials Advisory Board. Reza Abbaschian is Vladimir A. Grodsky Professor of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Florida. He has been at the university since 1981 and served as chairman of the department from 1986 to 2003. Prior to this, he was chairman and served on the faculty at the Pahlavi University, Shiraz, Iran, and was a visiting associate professor at the University of Illinois and a visiting scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has more than 200 scientific publications on subjects such as metals processing, crystal growth, solidification, intermetallic matrix composites, and phase diagrams. He also has four patents and five books to his credit, and he coauthored the third edition of Physical Metallurgy Principles. Dr. Abbaschian has been active in several regional and national educational and professional organizations, including the National Materials Advisory Board, NASA's Space Station Users Advisory Committee, the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society Board of Directors, trustee of the Federation of Materials Societies, National Science Foundation Materials Research Advisory Committee, and chairman of the University Materials Council. Erik Antonsson is currently chief technologist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and is also a professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). He has been at Caltech since 1984 where he organized the Engineering Design Research Laboratory and has conducted research and taught. His research interests include the areas of formal methods for engineering design, rapid assessment of early designs, and structured microelectromechanical systems design. His research accomplishments include

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Retooling Manufacturing: Bridging Design, Materials, and Production the development of formal methods for engineering decisions and trade-offs and for representing and manipulating imprecision in engineering design, automated methods for synthesis of engineering design, structured design synthesis of microelectromechanical systems, and the invention and development of digital micropropulsion microthrusters. Dr. Antonsson is currently on the editorial board of the international journals Research in Engineering Design and Fuzzy Sets and Systems, and from 1989 to 1993 served as an associate technical editor of the ASME Journal of Mechanical Design (formerly the Journal of Mechanisms, Transmissions and Automation in Design), with responsibility for the design research and the design theory and methodology areas. He has published more than 100 scholarly papers in engineering design research literature, has edited two books, and holds five U.S. patents. Thomas S. Babin is the director of the Virtual Design and Manufacturing Group at Motorola Advanced Technology Center. He has been with Motorola since 1987 and is involved in projects related to virtual prototyping, manufacturing, and reliability. Prior to joining Motorola he worked as a consultant with General Motors, Ford Motor Company, General Electric, and others in the area of statistical methods for the improvement of quality and productivity. Dr. Babin has been involved in the design of software and the design and delivery of several internal short courses related to statistical experimental design, process characterization and optimization, and electronic assembly line throughput estimation. He is a member of Alpha Pi Mu, Phi Kappa Phi, the Institute of Industrial Engineers, the American Society for Quality, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Society of Manufacturing Engineers, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers. Bruce Boardman has been the manager for metals research at the John Deere Technology Center since 1986. From 1968 to 1986 he was a metallurgist at John Deere. Before that, he was a metallurgist at Republic Steel Corp. Mr. Boardman is past chair and a current member of the ASM International Database Committee and the Federal Affairs Committee. His expertise is primarily in ferrous metallurgy (steel and cast iron) as well as powder metallurgy and aluminum (wrought and cast), including heat treatment, welding, forming, machining, plating, and other processes involved in the making of ferrous parts for the ground and heavy equipment industries. He has supervised and managed metallurgy, ceramic, failure analysis, heat treatment, wear test, and lubrication laboratories and research since 1972. He is a member of several ASM International, Society of Automotive Engineers, and American Society of Mechanical Engineers committees. He is a fellow of the ASM International. Timothy J. Considine is a professor of energy, environmental, and mineral economics at the Pennsylvania State University. He is also the current Gilbert F. White Postdoctoral Fellow at Resources for the Future. His research focuses on energy and materials markets, as well as how those industries interact with the environment. Another area is risk management, such as valuation of weather derivatives for use in decision making. He has published in prestigious journals, including Review of Economics and Statistics, Journal of Business and Economic Statistics, and Journal of Environmental Economics and Management. He has conducted research on the industrial ecology of steel; the impact of sales from the U.S. strategic petroleum reserves on global crude oil markets; commodity price and inventory dynamics; electricity deregulation in California and Pennsylvania; and the value of improved forecasts of hurricanes to oil and gas producers in the Gulf of Mexico. Prior to joining Penn State in 1986, he worked at Bank of America and at the U.S. Congressional Budget Office as an applied economist. He also held visiting positions in economics at American University in Washington, D.C., as well as at the University of Newcastle, Australia.

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Retooling Manufacturing: Bridging Design, Materials, and Production Jonathan Dantzig is a professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He worked on casting process development at Olin Metals Research Laboratories from 1977 to 1982. While there, he was principal inventor of a process to produce "rheocast" microstructures in continuously cast aluminum alloys. He moved to the University of Illinois, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, in 1982, where he is currently a professor of mechanical engineering. His area of specialization is the modeling of casting processes, including foundry and continuous casting. Professor Dantzig is co-holder of 20 U.S. patents deriving from his work at Olin and has authored numerous publications in the field of casting process modeling, including a recently published textbook, Modeling in Materials Processing, coauthored with Charles Tucker III. His current research interests include studies of microstructure development, residual stresses in casting and quenching, and optimization applied to process design. Mark Gersh is currently manager of the Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center's Modeling, Simulation and Information Sciences Department responsible for pursuing destabilizing information technologies critical to the success of the Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company. He also serves as the Lockheed Martin program manager for an effort with the Advanced Systems and Technology arm of the National Reconnaissance Office exploring constructs for agile design and development of space systems. Previously, Mr. Gersh was the Lockheed Martin program manager for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA) simulation-based design effort. This program pioneered the use of virtual prototyping technology in the form of advanced integration frameworks, product modeling techniques, software agent-based services, and multidisciplinary optimization. Prior to joining Lockheed Martin, Mr. Gersh was director of research for the Vanguard Information Technology Strategy Program within Computer Sciences Corporation's subsidiary Index. Before holding this position, Mr. Gersh was a program manager for the Information Technology Office at DARPA and actively managed a portfolio of research and advanced technology development that focused on experimental information systems architectures, engineering, and integration. George T. "Rusty" Gray III is a laboratory fellow and team leader of the dynamic properties and constitutive modeling team within the Materials Science Division of Los Alamos National Laboratory. His research is focused on experimental and modeling studies of substructure evolution and mechanical response of materials. These constitutive and damage models are utilized in engineering computer codes to support large-scale finite element modeling simulations of structures in such areas as national defense (Department of Energy and DoD), industry (crashworthiness work with General Motors, Ford, and Chrysler), foreign object damage (General Electric Aircraft engines), and manufacturing (International Nickel Company, Ford). The constitutive models are utilized by the U.S. Navy, Air Force, and Army for both platform and munitions simulations related to performance and for manufacturing simulations. He is the project leader for a DoD Office of Munitions program on materials modeling and validation. He co-chaired the Physical Metallurgy Gordon Conference in 2000 and served on the board of directors of the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society as the chair of the Structural Materials Division from 2001 to 2003. He is a fellow of ASM International and serves on the International Scientific Advisory Board of the European DYMAT Association. He has authored or co-authored over 220 technical publications. Elizabeth A. Holm is a Distinguished Member of the Technical Staff, Materials and Process Modeling, at the Sandia National Laboratories. She is a computational materials scientist with a long-standing interest in bringing materials modeling to industrial practice. Over her 10 years at Sandia, she has worked on simulations to improve processes for lighting manufacture, microcircuit aging and reliability, and the processing of advanced bearing steels. Her research

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Retooling Manufacturing: Bridging Design, Materials, and Production areas include the theory and modeling of microstructural evolution in complex polycrystals, the physical and mechanical response of microstructures, and the wetting and spreading of liquid metals. She works with team members from industry, government, and academia to develop materials and process models. She develops, integrates, and parallelizes computational materials models at all length scales. Dr. Holm has several professional honors and awards. She has authored or co-authored over 100 publications. David A. Koshiba is the deputy director for the Phantom Works Lean and Efficient Thrust of The Boeing Company. He has 25 years of experience successfully leading multidisciplinary engineering and integrated product design teams. Previously, he was program manager for Lean Engineering/Design, Manufacturing, and Producibility Simulations Group responsible for leading a team to develop, enhance, and integrate modeling and simulation processes and supporting tools. Before that he was the forebody define manager for the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) program responsible for leading a team to develop and mature the JSF forebody structures and systems using advanced design tools and processes. He was responsible for developing a JSF virtual prototype, including implementation of three-dimensional solid models of structures and subsystems, assembly simulations, finite element modeling, and external loads development in an integrated digital environment. He was responsible for evaluation of the manufacturing organizations within McDonnell Douglas Corporation. Mr. Koshiba is a member of Sigma Gamma Tau—the National Honor Society for Aeronautical Engineers—and a senior member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Morris H. Morgan III is professor of chemical engineering and dean of the School of Engineering and Technology at Hampton University. He was development engineer at Inland Manufacturing Division of GMC, Dayton, Ohio, where he worked on the development of polyurethane foams for Pontiac's "Enduro" bumper by formulating and testing the effectiveness of different polymeric compounds. He was a system safety engineer for the Mound Laboratory, run by Monsanto Company in Miamisburg, Ohio, where he analyzed the safety and reliability of various manufacturing processes. After that, he was a staff scientist at the GE Corporate Research and Development Center, where he conducted research on the direct process for manufacturing of silicones. He went on to the position of associate professor of chemical engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York, before his current position at Hampton University, where he conducts research on statistical modeling of environmental and combustion systems. Dr. Morgan has published more than 70 scientific engineering papers. Daniel E. Whitney is a senior research scientist at the Center for Technology, Policy and Industrial Development and a senior lecturer in the Engineering Systems Division at MIT. His interests include the use of computers in product design, understanding the role of assembly in the design and manufacturing process, and understanding how companies decide what design and manufacturing skills are core competencies. He conducts research on product development, automation, CAD, mechanical assembly, outsourcing strategy, and comparisons of product development processes in U.S. and foreign companies. He teaches mechanical assembly and product development in the MIT Engineering and Business Schools. He consults for major corporations in product development, supplier relations, and technology strategy. Prior to joining MIT, Dr. Whitney spent 19 years at the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc., where he conducted research and consulting on robotics, assembly automation, design for assembly, and CAD tools for assembly processes. He has published over 80 technical articles, has co-authored a book on concurrent engineering, and holds a number of patents. In 2003, his book Mechanical Assemblies: Their Design, Manufacture, and Role in Product Development was published by Oxford University Press.