Appendixes



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 113
Army Science and Technology for Homeland Security: Report 2 - C4ISR Appendixes

OCR for page 113
Army Science and Technology for Homeland Security: Report 2 - C4ISR This page intentionally left blank.

OCR for page 113
Army Science and Technology for Homeland Security: Report 2 - C4ISR Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members John W. Lyons, NAE, Chair, consultant and retired director of the Army Research Laboratory (ARL), is a Ph.D. physical chemist. He served in research and development positions with the Monsanto Company for 18 years. In 1973 he joined the Commerce Department’s National Bureau of Standards (NBS). At NBS, he was the first director of the Center for Fire Research. In 1990 Dr. Lyons was appointed by President George H.W. Bush to be the ninth director of NBS, by that time renamed the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). In September 1993, he was appointed the first permanent director of ARL. At ARL, Dr. Lyons managed a broad array of science and technology programs. He has served on many boards and commissions, inter alia, the Federal Advisory Commission on Consolidation and Conversion of Defense Research and Development Laboratories. He currently serves on two boards of visitors at the University of Maryland. He is a member of the National Research Council’s Board on Army Science and Technology, as well as a member of a congressionally chartered committee at the National Defense University to study the potential effectiveness of the DOD laboratories in the transformed military of the future. Dr. Lyons was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1985. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the Washington Academy of Science and is a member of the American Chemical Society and of Sigma Xi. Dennis J. Reimer, Vice Chair, is director of the National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism, Oklahoma City. The institute is dedicated to preventing, reducing, and mitigating the effects of terrorism, with particular emphasis on the role of first responders. A retired U.S. Army general, he was most recently the 33rd Chief of Staff of the Army. Prior to his term as Chief of Staff,

OCR for page 113
Army Science and Technology for Homeland Security: Report 2 - C4ISR General Reimer commanded all Army forces (except Special Forces) assigned to the continental United States. He holds a B.S. from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and an M.S. from Shippensburg State College. Duane A. Adams is currently vice provost for research at Carnegie Mellon University. He holds a B.A. in mathematics from the University of Montana and a Ph.D. in computer science from Stanford University. Previously, Dr. Adams served at high levels of government in programs relating to advanced computer research, including service in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Program Analysis and Evaluation). Dr. Adams has also been a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board and a member, vice chair, and chair of the Army Science Board. In addition, he has served as a member of several National Research Council committees, including the Committee on Air Force Base Level Automation and the Committee to Study International Developments in Computer Science and Technology. Henry L. Bertoni is head of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Polytechnic University in New York. He received a Ph.D. in electrophysics in 1967 from Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn (now Polytechnic University). Since the mid-1980s, Dr. Bertoni has led a group in the study of ultrahigh-frequency propagation in urban environments. He and his associates were the first to understand the mechanisms governing average signal strength for elevated base station antennas of cellular mobile radio. The results of these advances are the basis for the COST-231 model used throughout the world for installation of a 1900-MHz global system for mobile communications (GSM) and personal communications service (PCS) systems. Dr. Bertoni’s group has also studied characteristics of the indoor radio channel both theoretically and experimentally. These studies have led to ray tracing codes predicting indoor propagation. Dr. Bertoni has been widely published and is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and a member of the International Scientific Radio Union and the Radio Club of America. He has served as chair of the Technical Committee on Personal Communications of the IEEE Communications Society, and as chair of the Hoover Medal Board of Award. James J. Carafano is the senior research fellow for defense and homeland security in the Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis Institute for International Studies at the Heritage Foundation in Washington, D.C. Dr. Carafano joined the foundation after serving as a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments, a Washington policy institute dedicated to defense issues. Before that, he served for 25 years in the Army, rising to the rank of lieutenant colonel. During his service, Dr. Carafano served in Europe, Korea, and the United States and was a special assistant to the Army Chief of Staff, the service’s highest-ranking officer. Before retiring, he was executive editor of the Joint Force

OCR for page 113
Army Science and Technology for Homeland Security: Report 2 - C4ISR Quarterly, the Department of Defense’s principal professional military journal. Dr. Carafano also taught military history at the U.S. Military Academy West Point and the U.S. Army Field Artillery School and served as the director of military studies at the Army’s Center of Military History. He continues to teach as an adjunct professor at Georgetown University and at the U.S. Naval War College. He is the author of two books: Waltzing into the Cold War (published in 2002 by Texas A&M University) and After D-Day: Operation Cobra and the Normandy Breakout, a Military Book Club selection (published in 2000 by Lynne Rienner). A graduate of West Point, Dr. Carafano also has a doctorate from Georgetown University and a master’s degree in strategy from the U.S. Army War College. George M. Clark, as president and cofounder of Radiance Technologies, has led the development of the company to its current size (projected sales in 2003 of $15.5 million, and 90 employees). Dr. Clark managed the development of the Small Arms Tactical Recognition Equipment (STARE) System that supports ground forces by detecting, classifying, and locating small-caliber weapons in real time. He is currently leading the Overwatch Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration, a direct follow-on of STARE. He led the Radiance (STD) Program Analysis and Concept Engineering (SPACE) Program for the Space Technology Directorate of the Army’s Missile and Space Technology Center. In that capacity, Dr. Clark provided technical expertise and leadership in the areas of system engineering, system design, test planning, and programmatic support for STD programs, including the Battlefield Ordnance Awareness Program, the Radar Power Technology Program, the Overhead Sensor Program, and other space technology activities. Dr. Clark holds a Ph.D. from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Timothy Coffey holds a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Michigan. Dr. Coffey joined the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in 1971 as head of the Plasma Dynamics Branch in the Plasma Physics Division. In this position, he directed research in the simulation of plasma instabilities, the development of multidimensional fluid and magnetohydrodynamic codes, and the development of computer codes for treating chemically reactive flows. In 1975, he was named superintendent, Plasma Physics Division; he was appointed associate director of research for general science and technology on January 1, 1980. On November 28, 1982, he was named director of research. Dr. Coffey retired from the NRL in October 2001 and joined the University of Maryland. He has contributed to the theory of nonlinear oscillations and has played a major role in the national program on high-altitude nuclear effects. The author or coauthor of more than 70 publications and reports, Dr. Coffey has made several fundamental contributions to the theory of electron beam/plasma interaction and to the understanding of plasma processes in Earth’s ionosphere. Dr. Coffey is a fellow of the American

OCR for page 113
Army Science and Technology for Homeland Security: Report 2 - C4ISR Physical Society, the Washington Academy of Science, and the Franklin Institute, and a member of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and Sigma Xi. He was awarded the Delmer S. Fahrney Medal and the Department of Defense’s Distinguished Service Medal in 1991, and in August 2000 he was awarded the Navy’s prestigious Captain Robert Dexter Conrad Award. Upon his retirement from the Naval Research Laboratory, he was awarded the NRL Lifetime Achievement Award. Anthony C. DiRienzo is currently the executive vice president and chief technology officer of COLSA Corporation, located in Huntsville, Alabama. Dr. DiRienzo oversees the operations of 75 different programs of various government contracts, including radar hardware-in-the-loop development, large-scale computing network development, advanced signal processing algorithms, intelligence program support, acquisition and force management support, missile defense test and evaluation, integrated system testbed development, complex system integration programs, and software independent validation and verification. Previously, from 1995 to 1998, he directed the joint Army-Ballistic Missile Defense Organization $150 million contract to construct the national missile defense radar prototype located at the Reagan Test Site in the Pacific. Additionally, his professional activities have included directing the Army/Marine Corps Firefinder field artillery counterbattery radar program and serving as a staff officer in the Army Secretariat with responsibility for wide-ranging classified vulnerability assessment programs for Army weapon systems. He holds an M.A. from Georgetown University in international security and an M.S. in nuclear physics and a Ph.D. in plasma physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Mitra Dutta currently serves as professor and head of electrical and computer engineering, as well as adjunct professor of physics, at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She received her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Cincinnati. She has had appointments at the College of Arts and Sciences at Kingston, Jamaica, West Indies; postdoctoral appointments at Purdue University and City College of New York; and adjunct professor appointments at Rutgers University, the University of Maryland, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, as well as at Brookhaven National Laboratory. She worked for 15 years at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory in various capacities, and prior to joining the faculty of the University of Illinois, Dr. Dutta served in a senior executive service position in the Army Research Office (ARO), now a component of the U.S. Army Research Laboratory. She has authored or coauthored more than 370 publications and presentations and holds 29 U.S. and Canadian patents. She is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Optical Society of America. Dr. Dutta was the recipient of the U.S. Army Research and Development Achievement Awards in 1990, 1992, and

OCR for page 113
Army Science and Technology for Homeland Security: Report 2 - C4ISR 1995, the Harold Jacobs Award in 1991, the Paul A. Siple Award in 1994, the IEEE Harry Diamond Award in 2000, and the National Award for Achievement from the Society of Women Engineers in 2003. Frederick L. Frostic is currently a principal with Booz Allen Hamilton. Prior to joining Booz Allen, he served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Requirements and Plans, preparing the Defense Planning Guidance, supervising the Department OF Defense’s response to the congressionally mandated Commission on Roles and Missions, and conducting crisis planning, reviews of plans, and force structure analysis. Recently, he was the project manager of a team providing research to the U.S. Commission on National Security/21st Century (Hart-Rudman Commission). In this effort, his team wrote the implementation plan for the commission’s recommendations on homeland security. Additionally he was the project manager for providing research support to the Presidential Commission on Critical Infrastructure Protection. Mr. Frostic, a graduate of the Air Force Academy, earned an M.S. in engineering from the University of Michigan in 1971. C. William Gear, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, is president emeritus of the NEC Research Institute. Prior to joining NEC, he was head of the Department of Computer Science and professor of computer science and applied mathematics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research expertise is in numerical analysis and computational software. Dr. Gear is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). He served as president of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics and was the recipient of the ACM SIGNUM George E. Forsythe Memorial Award and Fulbright and Johnson Foundation fellowships. James R. Klugh is currently the technical director and vice president for information technology for Dimensions International, Inc. A retired Army major general, his last military position was as assistant deputy chief of staff for logistics at Headquarters, Department of the Army. He is a nationally recognized leader with extensive experience in command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance. A graduate of South Carolina State University with a B.S. in chemistry and mathematics, Mr. Klugh also has an M.S. in administration and management from Shippensburg State College in Pennsylvania. He served as director of the Department of Defense’s chemical and biological research, development, and defense programs and has also developed plans and managed activities in response to chemical, biological, and nuclear incidents. Mr. Klugh established a joint total asset visibility program for tracking supply support to all armed forces, including the National Guard and the Reserves.

OCR for page 113
Army Science and Technology for Homeland Security: Report 2 - C4ISR This program included the use of best technology solutions in radio frequency, satellite tracking, and automatic identification equipment. The global technical architecture of tracking and reporting devices established the foundation for in-transit visibility of personnel, equipment, and supplies across the Department of Defense. Joseph P. Mackin is currently president of E-OIR Measurements, Inc., a sensor applications company in Virginia. He has an extensive background in sensors, having served in many Department of Defense sensor development and acquisition assignments. He was the project officer for the Air Force office developing sensors for high-valued assets such as nuclear weapons, deputy division director of the Laser Division at the U.S. Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate, product manager for the Army’s second-generation FLIR (thermal imager) for the Abrams Tank and Bradley Fighting Vehicle, and the director of special programs on the staff of the Army acquisition executive. Since retiring from the Army, and prior to accepting his current position, he worked at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Lincoln Laboratory as an assistant group leader in the Sensors Applications Group, where he was the technical lead for the Deputy Undersecretary of Defense for Science and Technology’s Smart Sensor Web program. His education includes a B.S. from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, an M.S. in physics from the Naval Postgraduate School, and a Ph.D. in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is also a graduate of the Defense Systems Management College. Louis C. Marquet, received his B.S. degree from the Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon University) and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in physics from the University of California at Berkeley. Now retired from the Civil Service, he serves as a private consultant. His previous position was director of the Army’s Communications and Electronics Command Research, Development, and Engineering Center at Fort Monmouth, New Jersey. Prior to this assignment, Dr. Marquet held a number of senior government positions, including director of the Army’s Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate, assistant deputy undersecretary for technology in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, deputy for technology at the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (now Missile Defense Agency), and director of the Directed Energy Office at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. Additional positions that Dr. Marquet has held include vice president at the Nichols Research Corporation and the Atlantic Aerospace Electronics Corporation, associate head of the Optics Division at the MIT Lincoln Laboratory, assistant professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Arizona, Tucson, and assignment on active duty with the U.S. Army (Signal Corps). Dr. Marquet has received numerous official awards and recognition, including the Office of the Secretary of Defense Meritorious Civilian Service Award (twice), the Presidential Rank Award for Meritorious Executives

OCR for page 113
Army Science and Technology for Homeland Security: Report 2 - C4ISR in 1999, the Senior Executive Association Professional Development League 1998 Executive Achievement Award, and the ADPA 1987 Strategic Defense Award. Most recently, he was awarded the AFCEA Benjamin H. Oliver Gold Medal for Engineering for 2000. Lois C. McCoy is president of the National Institute for Urban Search and Rescue (NIUSR), an organization that established the first urban rescue teams in California in 1981. These teams are now designated as Federal Emergency Management Agency Task Forces; they responded to the disasters at the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 11, 2001. Ms. McCoy was one of the founding members of the institute in 1977, serving first as its CEO and then becoming president in 1981. NIUSR is a principal national center for the application of new technology toward lifesaving improvements from the field up through the policy level. Its core cadre of 250 is chosen from across the diverse fields of first responders, military institutions, government at all levels, industry, and academia. Previously, Ms. McCoy had been in the field of lifesaving for more than 30 years, beginning as a founding member of the prestigious San Diego Mountain Rescue Team. She came up through the ranks of the emergency management field, through mountain and desert rescue, as an emergency medical technician, communicator, operation leader, government liaison, military liaison, urban task force developer, and county government emergency manager and coordinator. Ms. McCoy currently leads the joint executive board of NIUSR. Chandra Kumar N. Patel, a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Sciences, is chief executive officer and chairman of the board of Pranalytica, Inc., and a professor of physics and former vice chancellor of research at the University of California at Los Angeles. Until 1993, Dr. Patel served as executive director of the Research, Materials Science, Engineering, and Academic Affairs Division at AT&T Bell Laboratories. Dr. Patel has an extensive background in several fields, including materials, lasers, and electro-optical devices. During his career at AT&T, which began in 1961, he made numerous seminal contributions in several fields, including gas lasers, nonlinear optics, molecular spectroscopy, pollution detection, and laser surgery. Dr. Patel has served on numerous government and scientific advisory boards, and he is a past president of Sigma Xi and the American Physical Society. In addition, he has received numerous honors, including the National Medal of Science for his invention of the carbon dioxide laser. Albert A. Sciarretta is president of CNS Technologies, Inc., a company that consults on research and development, experimentation, modeling and simulation, management, and assessment of advanced information, sensor, and test technologies. He recently served as experiment director of the Department of Defense’s Smart Sensor Web effort and as director of a demonstration of an

OCR for page 113
Army Science and Technology for Homeland Security: Report 2 - C4ISR integrated live-virtual-constructive simulation-based joint urban operations training environment. His current primary efforts include demonstrating networked sensor-information systems, assisting in the development of command and control (C2) systems for urban operations, assessing advanced information and test technologies, and identifying performance metrics for the Army’s Future Force Warrior and associated small-unit C2 systems. Mr. Sciarretta is a retired Army officer. He has a B.S. degree from the U.S. Military Academy and dual M.S. degrees in mechanical engineering and operations research from Stanford University. He previously served as a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Committees on Review of the Department of Defense Air and Space Systems Science and Technology Program, Army Unmanned Ground Vehicle Technologies, and Advanced Energetic Materials. Annette L. Sobel is a distinguished member of the technical staff of Sandia National Laboratories and a systems analyst with 13 years of experience in advanced technology development and unconventional threat analysis. She is currently serving as the director of homeland security for the state of New Mexico. Her research interests focus on applications of biotechnology and information technologies in support of chemical-biological countermeasures and in the field of human factors/systems engineering (e.g., critical decision making under stress) domains. Her work has emphasized information analysis, advanced systems for mission rehearsal and training, human performance enhancements, and technology transition to field operational environments. She is a Brigadier General in the Air National Guard and the J2, director of intelligence for the National Guard Bureau, and previously special assistant for weapons of mass destruction and civil support. She has 11 years of military command experience that includes combat and chemical-biological warfare medical response unit commands. Dr. Sobel earned an M.D. at Case Western Reserve University, with a specialization in family medicine at Duke University Medical Center. She has an M.S. in aerospace medicine with an emphasis on human factors engineering from Wright State University. Currently, she is a member of the Defense Intelligence Agency’s advisory board. Michael F. Spigelmire is a consultant on crisis response, consequence management, and force protection. A retired U.S. Army lieutenant general, he has had a military career with a unique blend of conventional and special operations assignments. General Spigelmire commanded the U.S. Army’s Special Operations Command and then the VII Corps in Germany. Upon retirement, he assumed the position of deputy director of operations for the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games. This brought him into close contact with municipal, state, and federal officials. General Spigelmire holds an M.A. in international relations from Georgetown University. Additionally, he has completed studies at the U.S. Army Command and Staff College and the U.S. Army War College. General

OCR for page 113
Army Science and Technology for Homeland Security: Report 2 - C4ISR Spigelmire is currently the senior mentor for the Terrorist Response Senior Seminar, sponsored by the Joint Special Operations University and the Air Force Special Operations School, Hurlburt Field, Florida. Leo Young, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, retired as director for research and laboratory management in the Office of the Director for Defense Research and Engineering in the Office of the Secretary of Defense in 1994 and consulted almost full-time for that office until 2002. Since 1994, he has been on the Technology Advisory Board of Filtronic, an international company headquartered in the United Kingdom with research and manufacturing facilities in the United States. Dr. Young has held senior positions at the Naval Research Laboratory, the Stanford Research Institute, and the Westinghouse Electric Corporation. Dr. Young holds honors degrees in physics and in mathematics from Cambridge University and a doctor of engineering degree from Johns Hopkins University, which also awarded him the honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters, as well as the Woodrow Wilson Award for Distinguished Government Service. He has served on the Advisory Board of the Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering and is currently chairman of the External Advisory Committee to the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Dr. Young has authored, coauthored, or edited 14 books and more than 100 papers, and he holds 20 patents. He is a fellow and past president of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering of the United Kingdom. Dr. Young has also served on several NAE committees, including the National Academies’ Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable.