Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers

Karin Bartels is director of the Intellectual Property Management Department of Degussa Corporation. She has worked for Degussa both in Germany and in the United States for 19 years in various functions, including R&D, applied technology, corporate business planning, and new business development. In her last position as director for corporate innovation management at Degussa’s U.S. subsidiary, she was responsible for collaborations with U.S. universities. Bartels is a member of the Council for Chemical Research where she served on its governing board, is a member of the Industrial Research Institute and is active in its external directors technology network, and represents Degussa on the American Chemical Society’s Corporation Associates. She holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in chemistry, holds a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the Technical University of Braunschweig (Germany), and was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, Riverside.

Thomas M. Connelly, Jr., is senior vice president and chief science and technology officer, DuPont Company. He joined DuPont in 1977 as a research engineer and has served in a variety of research and plant technical leadership roles in the United States and overseas. Before assuming his current position in September 2000, he held leadership roles in the company’s engineering polymers business in Europe and Asia, served as business director in advanced fiber systems, and led the fluoroproducts business unit. He received his bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering and economics from Princeton University and his doctorate in chemical engineering from the University of Cambridge (1977).

Miles P. Drake joined Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., in 1986 as technology manager, electronics, for the company’s European applied R&D group. He was named European technology director in 1986 and in 1990 relocated to the United States, where he was named director, advanced technology, for the global applications development group. In 1994, Drake was appointed director of the Corporate Science and Technology Center; and in 1998, he was named director, gases and equipment group technology. He assumed his current position in February 2001. He is responsible for all technology companywide. Drake received a B.S. in chemistry from Cambridge University in 1971 and a Ph.D. in surface and colloid chemistry from the University of Bristol in 1975. He is chairman-elect of the Industrial Research Institute, a fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, a member of the Advisory Board of the Materials Research Center at Santa Barbara, California, and a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

Mostafa A. El-Sayed received his B.Sc. from Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt, and his Ph.D. from Florida State University. He was appointed to the faculty of the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1961 and in 1994 was named the Julius Brown Chair, Regents’ Professor and Director of the Laser Dynamics Laboratory at the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry of the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research involves ultrafast dynamics in molecules, in amorphous and crystalline solid material in the bulk and on the nanometer scale, and in photobiological systems. His studies involve ultrafast time-resolved laser techniques. El-Sayed has received numerous honors and awards and is an elected member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the Third World Academy of Science and an elected fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Physical Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. From 1980 to 2004, El-Sayed was the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Physical Chemistry A and B.



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Preparing Chemists and Chemical Engineers for a Globally Oriented Workforce: A Workshop Report to the Chemical Sciences Roundtable Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers Karin Bartels is director of the Intellectual Property Management Department of Degussa Corporation. She has worked for Degussa both in Germany and in the United States for 19 years in various functions, including R&D, applied technology, corporate business planning, and new business development. In her last position as director for corporate innovation management at Degussa’s U.S. subsidiary, she was responsible for collaborations with U.S. universities. Bartels is a member of the Council for Chemical Research where she served on its governing board, is a member of the Industrial Research Institute and is active in its external directors technology network, and represents Degussa on the American Chemical Society’s Corporation Associates. She holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in chemistry, holds a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the Technical University of Braunschweig (Germany), and was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, Riverside. Thomas M. Connelly, Jr., is senior vice president and chief science and technology officer, DuPont Company. He joined DuPont in 1977 as a research engineer and has served in a variety of research and plant technical leadership roles in the United States and overseas. Before assuming his current position in September 2000, he held leadership roles in the company’s engineering polymers business in Europe and Asia, served as business director in advanced fiber systems, and led the fluoroproducts business unit. He received his bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering and economics from Princeton University and his doctorate in chemical engineering from the University of Cambridge (1977). Miles P. Drake joined Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., in 1986 as technology manager, electronics, for the company’s European applied R&D group. He was named European technology director in 1986 and in 1990 relocated to the United States, where he was named director, advanced technology, for the global applications development group. In 1994, Drake was appointed director of the Corporate Science and Technology Center; and in 1998, he was named director, gases and equipment group technology. He assumed his current position in February 2001. He is responsible for all technology companywide. Drake received a B.S. in chemistry from Cambridge University in 1971 and a Ph.D. in surface and colloid chemistry from the University of Bristol in 1975. He is chairman-elect of the Industrial Research Institute, a fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, a member of the Advisory Board of the Materials Research Center at Santa Barbara, California, and a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. Mostafa A. El-Sayed received his B.Sc. from Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt, and his Ph.D. from Florida State University. He was appointed to the faculty of the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1961 and in 1994 was named the Julius Brown Chair, Regents’ Professor and Director of the Laser Dynamics Laboratory at the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry of the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research involves ultrafast dynamics in molecules, in amorphous and crystalline solid material in the bulk and on the nanometer scale, and in photobiological systems. His studies involve ultrafast time-resolved laser techniques. El-Sayed has received numerous honors and awards and is an elected member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the Third World Academy of Science and an elected fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Physical Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. From 1980 to 2004, El-Sayed was the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Physical Chemistry A and B.

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Preparing Chemists and Chemical Engineers for a Globally Oriented Workforce: A Workshop Report to the Chemical Sciences Roundtable Robert P. Grathwol has more than 30 years of experience as a professional historian and publishing scholar, beginning as a university professor and shifting after more than two decades to become an independent researcher and historical consultant. In 1988, he helped to found R & D Associates, a partnership providing historical research and services in organizational development. Since January 1998, Grathwol has served as director of the U.S. Liaison Office of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. He has a B.A. from Providence College, an advanced degree (Diplôme Supérieur) from the University of Strasbourg (France), and a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. He held faculty appointments at several institutions, most recently at Washington State University (1979-1990). Grathwol studied in France from 1961 to 1963 on a Fulbright fellowship and conducted research in Germany as a Humboldt research fellow in 1973-1975. He is fluent in German, French, and Italian. Sharon H. Hrynkow is the deputy director of the Fogarty International Center (FIC) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). FIC’s more than 20 programs and initiatives are aimed at reducing disparities in health status between rich and poor countries, and Fogarty is the focal point for international activities at NIH. Among Hrynkow’s specific fields of focus at FIC are efforts to combat “brain drain” among junior scientists from developing nations who are trained in the United States and initiatives to address gender issues related to global health. A native of Rhode Island, Hrynkow received her Ph.D. in neuroscience from the University of Connecticut. After completing postdoctoral training in brain development at the University of Oslo, she became a science officer at the U.S. Department of State, a position she held for roughly three years. She worked with interagency partners, State Department leadership, nongovernmental organizations, and business leaders to produce the first U.S. International Strategy on HIV/AIDS. Hrynkow was elected to the Council of Foreign Relations in 1996. Alvin L. Kwiram became vice provost at the University of Washington on January 1, 1987, and vice provost for research in 1990. In 2000, he stepped down as vice provost and returned to the Chemistry Department as professor of chemistry; he has taught since 1970. He serves as executive director of a new National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center in photonics and optoelectronics. His research is in physical chemistry, emphasizing the development of novel magnetic resonance techniques designed to probe the electronic structure of molecular systems in the solid state. Kwiram has received numerous honors and awards and is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a member of the Graduate Education Advisory Board of the American Chemical Society (ACS), and a member of the Executive Committee of the ACS Division of Physical Chemistry. He is the U.S. liaison for the Worldwide University Network, a consortium of international research universities. Kwiram received his B.A. in physics and B.S. in chemistry from Walla Walla College in 1958, and he received a Ph.D. in chemistry from the California Institute of Technology in 1962. Matthew J. Slaughter is associate professor of business administration at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College. He is also a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, a visiting fellow at the Institute for International Economics, and a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Slaughter’s expertise is in the economics and politics of globalization. Much of his recent work has focused on the global operations of multinational firms, in particular how knowledge is created and shared in these firms and how their cross-border production arrangements are structured. Slaughter joined the Tuck faculty in 2002. Before that, since 1994 he had been an assistant and associate professor of economics at Dartmouth, where in 2001 he received the school-wide John M. Manley Huntington Teaching Award. Slaughter received his bachelor’s degree summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Notre Dame in 1990 and his doctorate from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1994. Matthew V. Tirrell is dean of the College of Engineering at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He received his undergraduate education in chemical engineering at Northwestern University and his Ph.D. in 1977 in polymer science from the University of Massachusetts. From 1977 to 1999, he was on the faculty of chemical engineering and materials science at the University of Minnesota, and he served as head of that department from 1995 to 1999. His research has been in polymer surface properties, including adsorption, adhesion, surface treatment, friction, lubrication, and biocompatibility. He is coauthor of about 250 papers and one book and has supervised about 60 Ph.D. students. Tirrell has received numerous prestigious awards and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineers, and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In 2003, he concluded more than two years of service as co-chair of the steering committee for the National Research Council report Beyond the Molecular Frontier: Challenges for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, published in 2003 by the National Academies Press.