from elders to schoolchildren should be represented where appropriate. One possibility would be the involvement of school students in marine science activities, as for example is being done at Little Diomede, Alaska (K. Frost, ADF&G, personal communication, August 2001). The committee was impressed by the enthusiasm shown about being involved by students at places it visited, in particular at Unalakleet, where it met in the school’s facilities. In addition, asking this question leads to additional more detailed questions, such as the following: What communities are associated with which spawning and rearing areas for AYK Chinook stocks? What communities are associated with which spawning and rearing areas for AYK summer chum stocks? What communities are associated with spawning and rearing areas for AYK fall chum stocks? This last question also requires a list of spawning and rearing areas and communities, which also are basic research questions. What types of local habitat manipulation by communities would improve the survival of eggs, fry, and smolts in their associated spawning and rearing areas (such as live boxes, beaver dam management, woody debris, and predator fish management)? What monitoring program can be implemented to measure the success of egg, fry, and smolt survival at this local level? What types of genetic or biological markers can be used to identify fish from these local stocks?



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