Appendixes



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Emerging Technologies and Ethical Issues in Engineering: Papers from a Workshop, October 14–15, 2003 Appendixes

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Emerging Technologies and Ethical Issues in Engineering: Papers from a Workshop, October 14–15, 2003 Appendix A Biographies John F. Ahearne is director of the ethics program at Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society; adjunct professor of civil and environmental engineering and lecturer in public policy at Duke University; and adjunct scholar for Resources for the Future. He earned a Ph.D. in physics from Princeton University. An expert on nuclear power and nuclear weapons, Dr. Ahearne was a commissioner of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission from 1978 to 1983 (chairman from 1979 to 1981). He was deputy assistant secretary of energy in the White House Energy Office from 1977 to 1978 and deputy and principal deputy assistant secretary of defense from 1972 to 1977, working on weapons systems analysis. Dr. Ahearne is an active member of the National Academy of Engineering, American Nuclear Society, National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, and Society for Risk Analysis, of which he was president from 2001 to 2002. He currently chairs the National Research Council Board on Radioactive Waste Management and the American Physical Society Panel on Public Affairs. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Society for Risk Analysis, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Braden R. Allenby is the environment, health, and safety vice president for AT&T and an adjunct professor at Columbia University. He graduated cum laude from Yale University in 1972, received his J.D. from the University of Virginia Law School in 1978, his M.A. in economics from the University of Virginia in 1979, his M.A. in environmental sciences from Rutgers University in 1989 and his Ph.D. in environmental sciences from Rutgers University in 1992. Dr. Allenby

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Emerging Technologies and Ethical Issues in Engineering: Papers from a Workshop, October 14–15, 2003 is coauthor or author of several engineering textbooks, including Industrial Ecology (Prentice-Hall, 1995), Industrial Ecology and the Automobile (Prentice-Hall, 1997), and Industrial Ecology: Policy Framework and Implementation (Prentice-Hall, 1999). Stephanie J. Bird is coeditor of the journal Science and Engineering Ethics, an international publication that explores ethical issues of direct concern to scientists and engineers. The journal is widely abstracted and indexed and was recently cited by the National Academy of Sciences as a leading resource for scholarly articles on research integrity. Dr. Bird is a former special assistant to the vice president for research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where she worked on the development of educational programs that address ethical issues in science and engineering, professional responsibilities, and ethical issues in research practice and science generally. She is also a laboratory-trained neuroscientist whose research interests include the ethical, legal, and social policy implications of scientific research. Dr. Bird teaches in her areas of expertise at MIT and has written numerous articles on the responsible conduct of research and mentoring and other responsibilities of science professionals. She also lectures and conducts workshops at professional societies, conferences, medical schools, and research and teaching institutions in the United States and other countries. Charles E. (Ed) Harris earned a B.S. in biology and chemistry and a Ph.D. in philosophy from Vanderbilt University. His area of expertise is practical ethics, with a special focus on engineering ethics. In addition to a number of papers in professional journals, Dr. Harris is coauthor, with Michael S. Pritchard and Michael J. Rabins, of Engineering Ethics: Concepts and Cases (Wadsworth Publishing, 1995), Practicing Engineering Ethics (IEEE, 1997), and Applying Moral Theories, (Wadsworth Publishing, 1997, 3rd ed.). Joseph R. Herkert is associate professor of multidisciplinary studies, director of the Benjamin Franklin Scholars Program (a dual-degree program in engineering and humanities/social sciences), and interim director of the Science, Technology, and Society Program, all at North Carolina State University. Dr. Herkert teaches courses in Engineering Ethics; Science, Technology and Values; Technological Catastrophes; and Technology Assessment. He received a B.S.E.E. from Southern Methodist University and a D.Sc. in engineering and policy from Washington University in St. Louis. His research interests include engineering ethics, social implications of information and communication technology, and energy/environmental policy. Dr. Herkert is editor of Social, Ethical and Policy Implications of Engineering: Selected Readings (Wiley/IEEE Press, 1999) and the IEEE journals, Society on Social Implications of Technology and Technology

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Emerging Technologies and Ethical Issues in Engineering: Papers from a Workshop, October 14–15, 2003 and Society. He is also a former president of the Society on Social Implications of Technology. Deborah G. Johnson is the Anne Shirley Carter Olsson Professor of Applied Ethics at the University of Virginia (UVA). She joined the faculty at UVA in the fall of 2001 after three years at Georgia Institute of Technology and 20 years at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Dr. Johnson is the author or editor of more than 40 published papers and four books, including a popular textbook, Computer Ethics (Prentice Hall, 2000), now in its third edition; the book has been translated into Spanish and Japanese. She is also coeditor of the journal, Ethics and Information Technology, and coeditor (with S. Rosser and M.F. Fox) of Women, Gender, and Technology, a series published by University of Illinois Press. Dr. Johnson recently completed a term as president of the Society for Philosophy and Technology and is currently president of a new professional society, the International Society for Ethics and Information Technology (INSEIT). George Khushf is humanities director of the Center for Bioethics and an associate professor in the Department of Philosophy, University of South Carolina. He is also a member of the editorial boards of several journals, including Health Care Analysis and Ethical Theory and Moral Practice, and a consultant on administrative and organizational ethics for government agencies, including the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control and the Department of Disabilities and Special Needs. He has published extensively on bioethics, the philosophy of medicine, and the philosophy of science and technology. Dr. Khushf is co-principle investigator of a $1.35 million grant from the National Science Foundation to study philosophical and ethical issues associated with nanotechnology. Some of his initial research will be published in a forth-coming issue of Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. After receiving his B.S. in civil engineering summa cum laude from Texas A&M University, Dr. Khushf went on to earn an M.A. and Ph.D. in philosophy and religion. Vivian Weil is director of the Center for the Study of Ethics in the Professions at the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT). She received her A.B. and M.A. from the University of Chicago and her Ph.D. from the University of Illinois, Chicago. During the academic year 1990–1991, she was director of the Ethics and Values Studies Program of the National Science Foundation. Dr. Weil is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Governing Board of the National Institute for Engineering Ethics, the Executive Committee of the Association for Practical and Professional Ethics, and a former member of the Committee on Computer Use in Philosophy of the American Philosophical Association. Her recent public lectures and panel presentations have dealt with ethical issues in research, intellectual property in graduate science education, conflicts of interest involving university scientists, educating scientists and engineers

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Emerging Technologies and Ethical Issues in Engineering: Papers from a Workshop, October 14–15, 2003 concerning professional responsibility, and mentoring and ethical issues in biotechnology. Dr. Weil is coeditor of Owning Scientific and Technical Information: Value and Ethical Issues (Rutgers University Press, 1990), editor of Beyond Whistleblowing: Defining Engineers’ Responsibilities (CSEP, 1983), and editor of Trying Times: Science and Responsibilities after Daubert, produced by CSEP in collaboration with the Institute for Science, Law and Technology (ISLAT) at the IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law. Caroline Whitbeck is Elmer G. Beamer-Hubert H. Schneider Professor in Ethics at Case Western Reserve University, where she holds appointments in the Department of Philosophy and the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Dr. Whitbeck earned a B.S. in mathematics from Wellesley College, an M.S. from Boston University, and a Ph.D. in philosophy from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In the 1970s and 1980s, she initiated feminist philosophical critiques of science, delineated a feminist self-other distinction, and gave philosophical voice to ethical concerns underlying the women’s health movement. In the 1980s and 1990s, she developed the analogy between ethical problems and design problems, particularly problems of engineering design and research design. She has pioneered active learning methods in the teaching of engineering ethics and the responsible conduct of research, with an emphasis on agent-centered problem solving, which has been widely adopted. Dr. Whitbeck was elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science for her work on engineering ethics and was a Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar in 1994–1995. She is the author of Ethics in Engineering Practice and Research (Cambridge University Press, 1998). Paul Root Wolpe is a professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania (Penn) and a member of the faculties of the Department of Medical Ethics and the Department of Sociology. He is also a senior fellow of the Center for Bioethics, director of the Program in Psychiatry and Ethics at the School of Medicine, senior fellow of the Leonard Davis Institute for Health Economics, and a member of the Cancer Center and Center for AIDS Research. In addition, Dr. Wolpe is the first chief of bioethics for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA); his responsibilities include ensuring that research subjects and astronauts are protected, both by NASA and by our international space partners. Dr. Wolpe is the author of numerous articles and book chapters on sociology, medicine, and bioethics and the author of Sexuality and Gender in Society (HarperCollins, 1996) and In the Winter of Life (Reconstructionist Rabbinical College, 2002). He serves on the national boards of the American Society of Bioethics and Humanities, Planned Parenthood Federation of America’s National Medical Committee, and the National Embryo Donation Advisory Board of RESOLVE and is an advisor to private industry and government agencies.

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Emerging Technologies and Ethical Issues in Engineering: Papers from a Workshop, October 14–15, 2003 Wm. A. Wulf, president of the National Academy of Engineering, is on leave from the University of Virginia (UVA), where he is AT&T Professor of Computer Science and University Professor. From 1988 to 1990, Dr. Wulf was assistant director of the National Science Foundation (again on leave from UVA). Prior to joining the faculty at UVA, he founded a software company, Tartan Laboratories, based on his research as a faculty member at Carnegie Mellon University. His research focused on computer architecture, computer security, programming languages, and the optimization of compilers. Dr. Wulf is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a corresponding member of the Academia Espanola de Ingeniera, a foreign member of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of four professional societies: Association for Computing Machinery, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Association for Women in Science. In addition, he has written more than 100 papers and technical reports and three books; he owns two U.S. Patents and has supervised more than 25 doctoral dissertations in computer science.

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