B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Joseph Pagano, M.D. (Chair) received his undergraduate degree from the University of Rochester with honors in English and his medical degree from Yale University in 1957. He has been a member of the faculty of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, since 1965 and is Professor of Medicine and Microbiology and Immunology. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and the American Association of Physicians. He is a past member of the Awards Assembly of the General Motors Cancer Research Foundation and past president and chairman of the Board of the Association of American Cancer Institutes. Dr. Pagano is past member of the Board of Directors of the Burroughs Wellcome Fund. He is a recipient of the North Carolina Award in Science and Chair of the North Carolina Advisory Committee on Cancer Coordination and Control. He is the Lineberger Professor of Cancer Research and Founder and Director Emeritus of the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center at The University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, School of Medicine.

Dr. Pagano is an expert on tumor viruses, specifically the Epstein-Barr Virus. His research focuses on molecular mechanisms of viral latency and oncogenesis and antiviral drugs. He is consultant to cancer centers in the United States and Canada, chair of the Scientific Advisory Board of Trimeris, Inc., member of the Scientific Advisory Board of AlphaVax, Inc., and advisor to the Franklin Street Partners.

Eric G. Campbell is an assistant professor at the Institute for Health Policy and the Department of Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. His main research interests lie in understanding the effects of



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Strategies to Leverage Research Funding: Guiding Dod’s Peer Reviewed Medical Research Programs B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Joseph Pagano, M.D. (Chair) received his undergraduate degree from the University of Rochester with honors in English and his medical degree from Yale University in 1957. He has been a member of the faculty of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, since 1965 and is Professor of Medicine and Microbiology and Immunology. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and the American Association of Physicians. He is a past member of the Awards Assembly of the General Motors Cancer Research Foundation and past president and chairman of the Board of the Association of American Cancer Institutes. Dr. Pagano is past member of the Board of Directors of the Burroughs Wellcome Fund. He is a recipient of the North Carolina Award in Science and Chair of the North Carolina Advisory Committee on Cancer Coordination and Control. He is the Lineberger Professor of Cancer Research and Founder and Director Emeritus of the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center at The University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, School of Medicine. Dr. Pagano is an expert on tumor viruses, specifically the Epstein-Barr Virus. His research focuses on molecular mechanisms of viral latency and oncogenesis and antiviral drugs. He is consultant to cancer centers in the United States and Canada, chair of the Scientific Advisory Board of Trimeris, Inc., member of the Scientific Advisory Board of AlphaVax, Inc., and advisor to the Franklin Street Partners. Eric G. Campbell is an assistant professor at the Institute for Health Policy and the Department of Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. His main research interests lie in understanding the effects of

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Strategies to Leverage Research Funding: Guiding Dod’s Peer Reviewed Medical Research Programs academic-industry relationships on the process and outcomes of biomedical research, the effects of local health care market competition on the activities and attitudes of medical school faculty, and the impact of data-sharing and withholding on academic science. In addition, he is researching the role of organizational culture in promoting patient safety. Dr. Campbell has published numerous articles in professional journals and has delivered numerous presentations at local, national, and international conferences on health care policy, medical education, and science policy. C. Thomas Caskey is president and chief executive officer of Cogene Biotech Ventures, Ltd. In addition, he was recently elected president of the newly formed Texas Academy of Science, Engineering and Medicine. Dr. Caskey also served as senior vice president, human genetics and vaccines discovery, at Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, Pennsylvania, and president of the Merck Genome Research Institute. He serves as an adjunct professor at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. Dr. Caskey earned his medical doctorate from Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. He has received numerous academic and industry-related honors. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine. He is past president of American Society of Human Genetics and the Human Genome Organization. He served as chair, Advisory Panel on Forensic Uses of DNA Tests, Office of Technology Assessment, U.S. Congress, 1989-1990. He was a member of the Committee on DNA Technology in Forensic Science, National Research Council, National Academy of Sciences, 1989-1991. Robert Cook-Deegan is director of the Center for Genome Ethics, Law, and Policy at Duke’s Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy. He is also research professor in Public Policy Studies and the Department of Medicine. Until July 2002, he directed the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Fellowship program at the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences. He worked on mental health policy, tobacco control, cancer policy, biomedical research policy, and federal R&D budgeting for 11 years at the National Academies, following a stint at the National Center for Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, in its inaugural year. He previously worked at the Office of Technology Assessment, U.S. Congress, for six years, joining OTA as a Congressional Science and Engineering Fellow directly from a postdoctoral position in molecular biology at the University of Colorado. He graduated from the University of Colorado Medical School in 1979 and from Harvard College (chemistry) in 1975. He chairs the Royalty Fund Advisory Committee for the Alzheimer’s Association and the external advisory board of a four-site project on genetic testing for Alzheimer’s susceptibility. He is secretary and trustee of the Foundation for Genetic Medicine and former chair of Section X (Social Impacts of Science and Engineering) for the American Association for the Advancement

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Strategies to Leverage Research Funding: Guiding Dod’s Peer Reviewed Medical Research Programs of Science, where he is also a fellow. From 1996-2003, he was a seminar leader for the Stanford-in-Washington undergraduate program. Dr. Cook-Deegan was a member of the Board of Directors, Physicians for Human Rights, 1988-1996, with whom he participated in human rights missions to Turkey, Iraq, and Panama. MaryAnn Feldman is Jeffery S. Skoll Chair in Technical Innovation and Entrepreneurship and professor of business economics at the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto. Dr. Feldman held the position of policy director for Johns Hopkins Whiting School of Engineering and prior to that she was a research scientist at the Institute on Policy Studies at the University. Dr. Feldman is on the Advisory Panel for the U.S. National Science foundation’s Program on Societal Dimensions of Engineering. Her research and teaching interests focus on the areas of innovation, the commercialization of research, and the factors that promote technological change and economic growth. A large part of Dr. Feldman’s work concerns the geography of innovation–investigating the reasons why innovation clusters spatially and the mechanisms that support and sustain industrial clusters. Mary Ann Guerra joined the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) as its vice president of Research Operations in early 2004. Ms. Guerra has an extensive background in business management and research administration, experience that ranges from basic research to clinical trials execution. Prior to her work at TGen, Ms. Guerra was executive vice president of the Matthews Media Group, Inc. (MMG), overseeing Business Development, Therapeutic Practice Areas, Communications and Public Relations, Human Resource Management and the Client Services Division. At MMG, she helped reorganize the company to become a strategic health communications firm that is research-based and results-oriented. From 1994 to 2001, she was deputy director for Management at the National Cancer Institute, the federal government’s lead agency for cancer research, where she oversaw a budget in excess of $4 billion and more than 5,000 people. Prior to that, she held several senior executive positions at the National Institutes of Health. Ms. Guerra holds a BA in Communications from The Ohio State University and an MBA in science, innovation and technology from George Washington University. She is an accomplished speaker who has received multiple professional awards. Musa Mayer is known for her work in cancer patient advocacy. Since 2001, she has served as a patient consultant with the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) Cancer Drug Development Program and as a patient representative with the FDA’s Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee. Her responsibilities involve representing patient interests, experiences, and needs in working along with FDA staff in the planning and conduct of clinical trials with pharmaceutical companies. Ms. Mayer has also participated as a peer consumer reviewer for the Breast

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Strategies to Leverage Research Funding: Guiding Dod’s Peer Reviewed Medical Research Programs Cancer Group in the preparation of new Cochrane Reviews. As a freelance journalist and author, Ms. Mayer has published three books on breast cancer including, most recently, After Breast Cancer: Answers to the Questions You’re Afraid to Ask. She is the author of Advanced Breast Cancer: A Guide to Living with Metastatic Disease, the only book of its kind. Ms. Mayer also writes feature articles on breast cancer for magazines, newsletters, websites, and medical journals, and she has been featured as a speaker at many conferences. She is a 15-year breast cancer survivor. Frank E. Samuel, Jr., has served as science and technology advisor to Ohio Governor Bob Taft since August 2000. In this role, Mr. Samuel advises the governor on science and technology issues as they relate to economic growth for the State of Ohio and focuses on aligning state science and technology programs with Governor Taft’s Third Frontier Project. As the science and technology advisor, he also serves as chair of the Technology Action Board (TAB) and the Biomedical Research & Technology Transfer Commission (BRTTC). The Board and the Commission were established to provide state support for creating early stage capital, developing new technologies, enhancing jobs and business opportunities in the state and improving the health of Ohioans. In July 2003, Mr. Samuel was appointed a member of the Third Frontier Commission, the three-person governing board that oversees the state’s Third Frontier Project. Prior to assuming his state position, Mr. Samuel served as president of the Edison Biotechnology Center, Inc., in Columbus, Ohio; president of the Health Industry Manufacturers Association (HIMA) in Washington, D.C.; practiced law in Washington, D.C., specializing in regulatory, legislative and other governmental issues affecting healthcare technology and services; and served in a variety of positions in the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, including Deputy Assistant Secretary for Legislation (Health). He has been a member of the board of directors of a dozen biomedical and health insurance companies and organizations. He is a graduate of Hiram College and Harvard Law School. Samuel Broder, Executive Vice President, Celera Genomics, Rockville, Maryland, was a committee member until May 25, 2004.