Appendix
Agenda of July 25-26, 2001, Symposium

WEDNESDAY, JULY 25, 2001

1:30 p.m.

Opening Remarks

Mary Shaw, Carnegie Mellon University, and Chair, Committee on the Fundamentals of Computer Science

1:45 - 3:15

Session 1: Impacts of Computer Science

Edward L. Ayers, University of Virginia—Understanding the Past as Information

Susan Landau, Sun Microsystems—The Profound Effect of CS on the Practice and Teaching of Mathematics

Michael Lesk, National Science Foundation—Computer Science Is to Information as Chemistry Is to Matter

3:15 - 3:30

Break

3:30 - 4:00

Guest Speaker

William A. Wulf, National Academy of Engineering—The Engineering and Science Fundamentals of Computer Science



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OCR for page 193
Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field Appendix Agenda of July 25-26, 2001, Symposium WEDNESDAY, JULY 25, 2001 1:30 p.m. Opening Remarks Mary Shaw, Carnegie Mellon University, and Chair, Committee on the Fundamentals of Computer Science 1:45 - 3:15 Session 1: Impacts of Computer Science Edward L. Ayers, University of Virginia—Understanding the Past as Information Susan Landau, Sun Microsystems—The Profound Effect of CS on the Practice and Teaching of Mathematics Michael Lesk, National Science Foundation—Computer Science Is to Information as Chemistry Is to Matter 3:15 - 3:30 Break 3:30 - 4:00 Guest Speaker William A. Wulf, National Academy of Engineering—The Engineering and Science Fundamentals of Computer Science

OCR for page 193
Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field 4:00 - 5:30 Session 2: Sampling of Hard Research Questions in Computer Science Sriram Rajamani, Microsoft Research—Specifying and Checking Properties of Programs Lillian Lee, Cornell University—“I’m Sorry Dave, I’m Afraid I Can’t Do That”: Linguistics, Statistics, and Natural Language Processing in 2001 Chee Yap, New York University—Toward Robust Geometric Computation 5:30 Reception 6:30 p.m. Dinner THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2001 7:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast 8:30 - 10:30 Session 3: CS Research: Content and Character Ursula Martin, University of St. Andrews—What Is Computer Science?—The European Perspective Neil Immerman, University of Massachusetts, Amherst—On the Unusual Effectiveness of Logic in Computer Science Amy Bruckman, Georgia Institute of Technology—Synergies Between Educational Theory and Computer Science Gerald Sussman, Massachusetts Institute of Technology—The Legacy of Computer Science 10:30 - 10:45 Break 10:45 - 12:00 Wrap-up Discussion—What Makes Computer Science Vital and Exciting? All-participant discussion, moderated by Jim Foley, Georgia Institute of Technology