Part Two
Selected Perspectives on Computer Science

The character of computer science research can perhaps best be appreciated by seeing some of the things computer scientists do and why they choose to do them. In Part Two, computer scientists explain not only some of the results achieved in several areas of computer science research but also what interests and excites them about the research. The diversity of the topics addressed in these essays reflects the diversity of the field itself.

The essays in Part Two are organized by chapter into several clusters:

  • Exponential growth, computability, and complexity. How computer science research makes possible a sustained growth in computing power and how theoretical models of computation help us understand intrinsic limits on what is computable (Chapter 2).

  • Simulation. How computer models can be used to simulate aspects of the physical world (Chapter 3).

  • Abstraction, representation, and notations. How abstraction is used to express understanding of a problem, manage complexity, and select the appropriate level of detail and degree of generality (Chapter 4).

  • Data, representation, and information. How computer science has developed new ways of storing, retrieving, and manipulating data, and how these techniques can profoundly influence the models of a wide range of professionals (Chapter 5).

  • Achieving intelligence. How computer science’s aspiration to emulate human intelligence has resulted in advances in machine learning,



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 25
Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field Part Two Selected Perspectives on Computer Science The character of computer science research can perhaps best be appreciated by seeing some of the things computer scientists do and why they choose to do them. In Part Two, computer scientists explain not only some of the results achieved in several areas of computer science research but also what interests and excites them about the research. The diversity of the topics addressed in these essays reflects the diversity of the field itself. The essays in Part Two are organized by chapter into several clusters: Exponential growth, computability, and complexity. How computer science research makes possible a sustained growth in computing power and how theoretical models of computation help us understand intrinsic limits on what is computable (Chapter 2). Simulation. How computer models can be used to simulate aspects of the physical world (Chapter 3). Abstraction, representation, and notations. How abstraction is used to express understanding of a problem, manage complexity, and select the appropriate level of detail and degree of generality (Chapter 4). Data, representation, and information. How computer science has developed new ways of storing, retrieving, and manipulating data, and how these techniques can profoundly influence the models of a wide range of professionals (Chapter 5). Achieving intelligence. How computer science’s aspiration to emulate human intelligence has resulted in advances in machine learning,

OCR for page 25
Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field computers’ natural-language understanding, and improved strategies for game-like situations (Chapter 6). Building computing systems of practical scale. How the design, development, and large-scale deployment of working computing systems—notably, the Internet—not only are of great practical value but also constitute a diverse and fruitful area of research by which computer scientists may improve these systems and create new ones (Chapter 7). Research behind everyday computation. How computer scientists’ efforts in the service of human effectiveness have led to such advances as spreadsheets, text-formatting programs, and information retrieval from the Internet, and how these and other innovations have had a very broad impact (Chapter 8). Personal passion about computer science research. How several computer scientists explain their commitment to computer science research (Chapter 9).

OCR for page 25
Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field 2 Exponential Growth, Computability, and Complexity The essay by Hill that follows describes how exponential growth in computing capability drives technological and intellectual progress and how computer science research works to sustain this remarkable growth. Next, Kleinberg and Papadimitriou address the intellectual essence of computation. They provide glimpses not only into the foundational models that define computation but also into theoreticians’ thinking about these models—what’s convincing, what’s surprising, what’s not. Finally, Bennett describes how quantum computing research seeks to dodge a fundamental physical limit of current computing technology and stretch our conception of computation.

OCR for page 25
Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field HARNESSING MOORE’S LAW Mark D. Hill, University of Wisconsin, Madison For most products, the claim “better and cheaper” casts suspicion on the salesperson. For computer-related products, however, “better and cheaper” has been wildly true for decades. In this essay, we seek to explain this success so as to give readers a foundation with which to appreciate what the future might hold. Specifically, we explain how rapid technological progress (e.g., the technologist’s Moore’s law) has been harnessed to enable better and cheaper computers (the popular media’s Moore’s law). We then touch upon future prospects for technological progress, computer implementation challenges, and potential impacts. How Does Computer Hardware Work? Before delving into our rapid progress in improving computers, it is important to reflect on how computers work. As discussed in Chapter 1 of this volume, computers are not designed to perform a single task. Instead they are machines that can perform many different computational tasks, including tasks that are not specified or even conceived until after the computer is deployed. We enable this flexibility by using software. Software represents a computational task to hardware as a collection of commands. Each command is called an instruction and the set of instructions that the hardware supports—its vocabulary—is its instruction set architecture. Most instructions are simple. An “add” instruction adds two numbers and indicates which instruction is next. A “branch” instruction compares two numbers to choose which instruction is next. The instructions manipulate data, such as numbers and characters. Moreover, instructions can manipulate other instructions, since most modern computers store instructions just like data. Treating instructions as data enables programs, such as compilers, that can translate high-level language programs (e.g., written in Java) into machine instructions (see Aho and Larus in Chapter 4). Computer hardware has three basic components: A processor executes instructions. Today, it is most common to implement a processor on a single silicon chip called a microprocessor. Most computers today employ a single microprocessor, but larger computers employ multiple microprocessors. Memory stores instructions and data. Current desktop computer memories are implemented in several chips and backed up by one or

OCR for page 25
Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field more magnetic disks. Larger computers can employ hundreds of memory chips and disks. Input/output devices connect a computer to both humans (e.g., keyboards, displays, mice, and speakers) (see Foley in Chapter 8) and to other computers via networks (see Peterson and Clark in Chapter 7). Hardware designers seek to make processors that execute instructions faster, memory that provides more information, and input/output devices that communicate more effectively. Furthermore, we can and do focus on making these primitive elements faster without worrying about what the software running on the hardware is actually doing. But how do we know this all works? Why is relatively simple hardware sufficient for most computing? Which instructions do I need in my instruction set architecture? Kleinberg and Papadimitriou in this chapter address these questions using the formal foundations of the Universal Turing Machine and the Church-Turing hypothesis. These foundations allow hardware designers to concentrate on the practical questions of engineering effective hardware. Moore’s Law and Exponential Growth The key enabler of “better and cheaper” computers has been rapid technological progress. Arguably, the most important enabler has been the progress in the number of transistors (switches) per semiconductor integrated circuit (chip). In 1965, Gordon Moore used four data points to predict that the number of transistors per chip would double every 2 years. He was not far off! The trend over the last 35 years has indeed been exponential, with the number of transistors per chip doubling approximately every 18 months. Technologists call this trend Moore’s law. Some commentators have implied that exponential growth, such as with Moore’s law, is unique to computer technology. This belief is incorrect. In fact, exponential growth is common and occurs whenever the rate of increase of a quantity is proportional to the size of the quantity. Examples include compound interest and unconstrained biological population growth. For example, $100 earning compound interest at a rate of 10 percent will more than double in 8 years: $214 = $100 × (1 + 0.10)8. To understand the implications of rapid exponential growth, consider the absurd example of your annual salary starting at a modest $16 but then doubling every 18 months for 36 years. This improvement corresponds to an annual growth rate of 59 percent. In the early years, your finances would be very tight (e.g., $64 after 3 years). You would have to live with your parents. With patience, you will eventually be able to buy a car ($16,000 after 15 years). Then you can move out and buy a house

OCR for page 25
Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field ($100,000 after 24 years). Eventually you will be very rich and have to dream up fundamentally new ways to spend money ($300 million after 36 years). The potency of Moore’s law is evident when we observe that it has followed the rate and duration of the absurd income example just given. Sixteen transistors per chip is a mid-1960s number, while 300 million transistors per chip is an early 21st century count. Of course, Moore’s law is not a law of nature. Rather it is a business expectation in the semiconductor industry: to stay even with their competitors, technologists should solve the problems to double the number of transistors per chip every 18 months. Fortunately, the number of transistors per chip is not the only technological aspect that is achieving rapid, exponential growth rates. The smaller transistors enabling Moore’s law also switch much faster. Moreover, improvements rivaling (or exceeding) Moore’s law have occurred in magnetic disk storage capacity and effective fiber optic network bandwidth. Unfortunately, some other technologies are improving much more slowly, notably the round-trip delays to memory chips, to disks, and across networks. Memory chip delays are improving slowly because memory chip manufacturers optimize for larger memory capacity instead. Disk delays seem limited by the inertia of mechanically moving macroscopic mass, while network delays are ultimately limited by the speed of light. How We Have Harnessed Exponential Growth While it is obvious that rapid technological improvements provide great opportunities for implementing computers, it is also the case that rapid and differential rates pose great challenges. Rapid change means that ideas that were too wasteful (e.g., in number of transistors) soon become appropriate and then become inadequate. The processors in 1960s computers required hundreds or thousands of chips. It was not until 1970 that is was even possible to implement a primitive processor on a single chip (and that first so-called microprocessor could only access a memory of 300 bytes, i.e., 0.0003 megabytes!). Subsequently, Moore’s law enabled microprocessors to use more and faster transistors. New microprocessor designers exploited this transistor bonanza to obtain computers that got faster more rapidly than the transistors got faster. Central to this effort are methods of using many transistors to cooperate side-by-side in what we call parallelism. Not surprisingly, approaches for exploiting transistor parallelism depend on scale or “level” (much as approaches for organizing humans to work in parallel depend

OCR for page 25
Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field greatly on whether 10, 1000, or 1 million people are available). With transistors in a microprocessor, we have organized our focus on bit and instruction level parallelism. Near the end of this essay, we discuss how the currently modest use of thread level parallelism needs to be greatly expanded. During the 1970s and earlier 1980s, microprocessor development focused on accelerating the execution of each instruction using bit level parallelism. Designers made changes to enable each instruction to both (a) manipulate a larger range of numbers (and symbols) and (b) perform those manipulations faster using more transistors side by side. Early microprocessors, for example, slowly performed manipulations on integers taking on one of 65,536 (216) values (or fewer). In a single instruction, a current microprocessor can rapidly transform data whose values range through billions (232) or quintrillions (264) of integer and fractional values. Since the mid-1980s, many microprocessor improvements have focused on parallelism between instructions, not within instructions, with what is called instruction level parallelism. Thus, instead of executing instruction A, then instruction B, and then instruction C, we try to do instructions A, B, and C at the same time. To exploit instruction level parallelism past a few instructions, however, it is necessary to predict the outcomes of program decisions (often embodied in branch instructions) and speculatively execute subsequent instructions. Instruction level parallelism techniques have been so successful that modern microprocessors can have several dozen instructions in execution at any one time! Nevertheless, most microprocessors still appear to execute instructions one at a time. This illusion allows these microprocessors to run existing software, unmodified. It enables performance gains without endangering the billions of dollars invested to develop and deploy existing software. The fact that technologies progress at different rates also poses challenges to computer implementations. Twenty years ago, the time to execute a multiply instruction and the time to access a computer’s main memory were comparable. Differential rates of improvement now make a multiplication more than 100 times faster than accessing main memory. Computer architects have responded with a plethora of types and layers of caches. Caches are smaller, faster memories that transparently hold the most-recently accessed subset of the information from a larger, slower memory. Caches are faster than main memory, because they are smaller (fewer bits to reach and select among) and can be implemented in technologies more optimized for speed. Caches often hold a very small fraction of the larger memory (e.g., a 64 kilobyte cache for a 64 megabyte memory). Nevertheless, they are able to satisfy a substantial fraction of requests quickly (e.g., 98 percent) due to locality (the property that, at many sizes and time scales, recently accessed information is highly likely

OCR for page 25
Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field to be re-accessed quickly). In some ways, caches work for reasons similar to why your cellular phone can hold many of the numbers you actually call. In fact, caches are so effective that current microprocessor designers spend most of their transistors on caches! More generally, caching benefits many aspects of computer systems, as locality is common and smaller memories are faster than larger ones in many technologies. Meeting the above challenges has enabled computers whose performance has been doubling every 2 years. Ambiguously, this trend is also called Moore’s law (e.g., by the popular press). At this point, we have two Moore’s laws: Technologist’s Moore’s law: number of transistors per chip doubles every 18 months, and Popular Moore’s law: computer performance doubles every 2 years. This popular Moore’s law has provided incredible opportunities for the rest of computer science. Everyone from researchers to product designers can dream up many ideas and ask not whether something will be practical, but when (assuming, of course, one is not trying to solve problems that cannot be solved or require execution times that defeat exponential growth with exponential complexity—see Kleinberg and Papadimitriou). This performance has facilitated major achievements, such as beating a chess grandmaster (Koller and Biermann, in Chapter 6), more realistic computer graphics (Fedkiw, in Chapter 3), better natural-language processing (Lee, in Chapter 6), and sequencing the human genome. In these and other cases, however, tremendous algorithmic and software advances were also necessary to effectively use faster hardware. Many times, however, cost reduction matters more than increasing performance. In these cases, rather than using more transistors to obtain more performance at constant cost, it makes more sense to use a constant number of transistors to obtain the same performance at reduced cost. Fortuitously, it turns out that every 2 years or so one can obtain the same level of performance for half the cost. In a decade, Jim Gray has observed, it will be possible to buy an equivalent computer for the sales tax on one today (even if the sales tax is as low as 3 percent, which approximately equals 1/25). Cost matters because more cost-effective computation can effectively be more widely applied. This cost reduction has enabled the rapid spread of inexpensive computers and enabled the explosive growth of the Internet (Peterson and Clark, in Chapter 7). Once again, creative innovations, such as word processors (Ullman, in Chapter 8), spreadsheets (Foley, in Chapter 8), and compelling multi-user environments (Bruckman, in Chapter 7) are necessary to make cost-effective hardware useful.

OCR for page 25
Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field Future of Moore’s Law and Beyond Recently, there have been several accounts predicting the end of the technologist’s Moore’s law. Since at least the early 1970s, there have been numerous predictions of its demise. However, technologists’ creativity has repeatedly solved the challenges to keep it on track. We are bullish that Moore’s law is safe for at least another decade, due to technologies already operating in the laboratory, backed by the motivation and vision of a trillion-dollar industry.1 Nevertheless, it seems probable that the doubling time for conventional chips will increase and the doubling will eventually halt as atomic limits are approached. There is already evidence that the doubling time for memory chips is now closer to every 2 years instead of every 18 months. A contributing factor to this slowdown is the exponentially increasing cost of building factories for fabricating chips. Taking a longer view, however, innovation beyond the technologist’s Moore’s law is likely. Computing has already been implemented by a series of technologies: mechanical switches, vacuum tubes, discrete transistors, and now chips driven by Moore’s law. Eventually, almost all computing technologies will be supplanted by newer ones. One emerging candidate uses synthetic organic molecules to perform switching and storage. Another seeks to exploit quantum superposition to change both the model and the implementation of some future computers (see Bennett in this chapter). Both approaches, however, are unproven and may yet be surpassed by other technologies, some of which are not yet invented. Moreover, we are not yet close to “fundamental” limits. We are many orders of magnitude from subatomic energy and storage limits imposed by currently understood physics. Furthermore, there is an existence proof that it is possible to organize computers in a way that is much better for many tasks: the human brain. As an aside, some argue that we do not need more computing performance. While it is indeed the case that other constraints, such as low power, low noise, and low environmental impact, are becoming more important, we argue for more cost-effective computer performance. First, all past predictions that there was enough computing performance have been wrong. Two decades ago, some predicted that the ultimate personal computer would support three M’s: one million instructions per second, one megabyte, and one million display elements. Today’s personal computers routinely exceed the first two attributes by two orders of magnitude and still seem inadequate. Second, there are clear opportunities of 1   See the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors Web site at http://public.itrs.net.

OCR for page 25
Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field applying more computing performance (and more algorithms) to make human-computer interactions closer to the natural-language exchanges envisioned in 2001: A Space Odyssey a third of a century ago. Third, as computing and communication get more cost-effective, surprising new applications are likely to be invented. Some of us used mainframes for decades without predicting the spreadsheet, while others used the Internet for years without predicting the World Wide Web. It will be surprising if an order-of-magnitude improvement in cost-effective computer performance does not enable a new disruptive application. Harnessing Future Exponential Growth In the coming decades, we seek to harness future technology growth, be it slow, fast, or discontinuous. How will we use more transistors (or more exotic technologies) to enable hardware that will support the creative applications being forecast in the rest of this volume? How do we exploit billions and trillions of transistors? (A computer with one gigabyte of memory, for example, has more than 8 billion transistors.) One known way is to go beyond bit- and instruction-level parallelism to also exploit thread-level parallelism. When a processor executes a sequence of instructions, we say it is executing a thread. Thread-level parallelism is exploited when software specifies multiple threads to execute and hardware is capable of executing the threads concurrently. Today, several important applications are specified with multiple threads, including database management systems (Gray, in Chapter 5) and Web crawlers (Norvig, in Chapter 8); multiple threading is also used to beat human chess champions (Koller and Biermann, in Chapter 6). Unfortunately, too many current applications are programmed with a single thread, even if the problem could be solved in parallel. Much established business software, for example, was written for a single thread, even when the problem was once solved by many clerks operating in parallel. Nevertheless, creating multi-threaded software has been difficult. In addition, the motivation to create it has been reduced by the fact that many current computers execute only one thread at a time. Emerging techniques for supporting multiple threads on a microprocessor, however, promise to make multi-threading hardware much more widely available. Moreover, there is also tremendous additional potential for using threads executing in parallel on multiple computers that communicate via local- or wide-area networks. In the extreme, computers around the world could be harnessed to solve problems on demand. This vision is now known as grid computing, since it strives to deliver customers access to computing resources much as the power grid delivers customers power. We encourage future efforts to exploit parallel threads in all their forms, because doing so represents

OCR for page 25
Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field the best-known way to grow computing performance much faster than Moore’s law enables for single processors. We also see additional opportunity provided by technology discontinuities and synergies. First, Moore’s law will soon enable a complete (albeit simple) computer on a chip. Today’s personal computers, for example, use a complete processor on a chip—the microprocessor—together with several memory and support chips. Single-chip computers could dramatically cut costs and expand the effectiveness of systems. While we have primitive single-chip systems today, more powerful ones might unleash progress in a manner similar to that unleashed by the increasing performance of microprocessors over the last three decades. For at least the next decade, however, single-chip solutions must focus on systems smaller than personal computers (because personal computers use too much memory to fit on a chip). Nevertheless, the history of computing has shown that new smaller systems are great catalysts for change: mainframes to minicomputers to personal computers to personal digital assistants to cellular phones. Second, technologists are now fabricating sensors and emitters on chips. This technology holds the promise of systems that integrate with their environment at unprecedently low cost. A current success story is an accelerometer for triggering automobile airbag deployment. Third, the further integration of computers with communication will make the world even smaller. Communication, with and without wires, will enable ubiquitous connectivity. The World Wide Web shows us how communication magnifies the value of computation. Now, imagine a Web where you are always online everywhere! Each of these trends will further integrate computers into our lives. In many cases, integration allows the computers to “disappear.” When Emily clicked to buy a book in the prelude to this volume, she was not even aware of most of the computers that implemented the transaction. Furthermore, she may not recognize her cellular phone, personal digital assistant, or pacemaker as computers; an integration that is an appropriate and natural consequence of our abilities to hide complexity from users. Our success in hiding computers when they work, however, brings with it a responsibility to hide them when they fail. Imagine Web services as available as telephones and personal computers as dependable as televisions. Numerous solutions will be needed to enable this dependability, taking into account needs and appropriate costs. Large commercial systems may seek 10 to 100 times improvements in availability for small overheads (e.g., 10 percent), while critical functions like pacemakers may tolerate tripling hardware costs. In many cases, the underlying hardware may get more unreliable, because transistors are so small (and susceptible to cosmic rays) and numerous (more chances to fail). While some improvements can be done in hardware, transparently to software, other

OCR for page 25
Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field BOX 2.2 Does P Equal NP? We have been concerned with the set of all problems that can be solved by a polynomial-time algorithm; let’s use P to denote this set of problems. Now, we believe that the Traveling Salesman Problem is very difficult to solve computationally; it is likely that this problem does not belong to the set P we have just defined. But there is at least one good thing we can say about its tractability. Suppose we are given N cities, the distances between them, and a budget B; and suppose that in fact there exists a tour through all these cities of length at most B. Then there exists a way for someone to prove this to us fairly easily: he or she could simply show us the order in which we should visit the cities; we would then tabulate the total distance of this tour and verify that it is at most B. So the Traveling Salesman Problem may not be efficiently solvable, but it is at least efficiently verifiable: if there is a short tour among the cities we are given, then there exists a “certificate”—the tour itself—that enables us to verify this fact in polynomial time. This is the crux of the Traveling Salesman Problem’s complexity, coiled like the “trick” that helps you solve a difficult puzzle: it’s hard to find a short tour on your own, but it’s easy to be convinced when the short tour is actually revealed to you. This notion of a certificate—the extra piece of information that enables you to verify the answer—can be formalized for computational problems in a general way. As a result, we can consider the set of all problems that are efficiently verifiable in this sense. This is the set NP—the set of all problems for which solutions can be checked (though not necessarily solved) in polynomial time. It is easy to show that any problem in P must also belong to NP; essentially, this is as easy as arguing that if we can solve a problem on our own in polynomial time, then we can verify any solution in polynomial time as well—even without the help of an additional certificate. But what about the other side of the question: is there a problem that belongs to NP but not to P, a problem for which verifying is easy but solving is hard? Although there is widespread belief that such problems must exist, the issue remains unresolved; this is the famous “P versus NP” question. To address this question, it is natural to seek out the “hardest” problems in NP, for they are the best candidates for problems that belong to NP but not to P. one city larger! Waiting for Moore’s law to deliver better computing power only gets you so far, and it does not beat down the exponential complexity of a deeply intractable problem. What is needed is not just better hardware on which to apply brute force, but also a better algorithm for finding a solution—something like what Edmonds found for the Matching Problem. The fact that simply-stated problems can have enormous complexity, with solutions that are computationally very difficult to find, has led to new perspectives on a number of well-studied ideas. Cryptography has

OCR for page 25
Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field How can we formalize the notion that one problem is at least as hard as another? The answer lies in reducibility, an idea that came up implicitly when we discussed computational impossibility. We say that a problem A is “reducible” to a problem B if, given a “black box” capable of solving instances of B in polynomial time, we can design a polynomial-time algorithm for A. In other words, we are able to solve A by drawing on a solution to B as a “resource.” It follows that if we actually had a polynomial-time algorithm for problem B, we could use this as our “black box,” and hence design a polynomial-time algorithm for problem A. Or, simply running this reasoning backward, if there is no polynomial-time algorithm for A, then there cannot be a polynomial-time algorithm for B: problem B is at least as hard as problem A. So here is a natural thing we might search for: a single problem B in NP with the property that every problem in NP is reducible to B. Such a problem would, quite conclusively, be among the hardest problems in NP—a solution to it would imply a solution to everything in NP. But do such problems exist? Why should there be a single problem that is this powerful? In the early 1970s, Steve Cook in North America and Leonid Levin in the Soviet Union independently made the crucial breakthrough, discovering a number of natural problems in NP with precisely this property: everything in NP can be reduced to them. Today we say that such a problem is “NP-complete,” and research over the past decades has led to the discovery that there are literally thousands of natural NP-complete problems, across all the sciences. For example, determining the winner(s) under a wide variety of election and auction schemes is NP-complete. Optimizing the layout of the gates in a computer chip is NP-complete. Finding the folding of minimum energy for discrete models of proteins is NP-complete. The Traveling Salesman Problem—the tough nut that started us on this road—is NP-complete. And an important thing to bear in mind is this: because every problem in NP is reducible to any of these, they are all reducible to each other. There is a polynomial-time algorithm for one if and only if there is a polynomial-time algorithm for all. So we have come to realize that researchers in a host of different areas, struggling over a spectrum of computationally intractable problems, have in a fairly precise sense all been struggling over the same problem; this is the great insight that NP-completeness has given us. The original question remains open. been revolutionized by the theory of complexity, for the design of secure communication protocols is a field that exists in a mirror-world where difficult computational problems—codes that are easy to apply and hard to break—are resources to be cultivated (see Sudan in Chapter 7). The RSA public-key cryptosystem was inspired by the presumed difficulty of factoring large integers, with the prime factors of a number N forming the hidden “key” whose knowledge allows for easy decryption. The age-old notion of randomness—a concept that is intuitively apparent but notoriously tricky to define—has been given an appealing formalization based

OCR for page 25
Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field on computational complexity: a sequence of digits appears “random” to an observer if it is computationally difficult for the observer to predict the next digit with odds significantly better than guessing. For designers of algorithms, we have seen that their struggle with the complexity of computation has proceeded at a number of different levels. One boundary divides the computable from the uncomputable—it is feasible to build a step-by-step interpreter for computer programs, but one cannot design an algorithm that decides whether arbitrary programs will terminate. Another boundary divides polynomial-time solvability from the exponential growth of brute-force search. But while polynomial time is indeed a good high-level means for gauging computational tractability, there are an increasing number of applications, typically involving very large datasets, where simply having a polynomial-time algorithm is far from adequate. Suppose the size of the input is measured in terabytes (millions of megabytes); an algorithm that takes a number of steps equal to the cube of the input size is no more useful in practice than one that never terminates. None of this is to say that polynomial time has lost its relevance to the design of algorithms. But for many large-scale problems, we are faced with a reprise of the situation in the 1950s and 1960s, when we tumbled from a concern with computability to a concern with computational complexity: as our real-world computational needs expand, our guidelines for what constitutes an “acceptable” algorithm become increasingly stringent. And this in turn has led to new lines of research, focusing for example on algorithms that must run in time very close to the size of the input itself; algorithms that must “stream” through the input data in one pass, unable to store significant parts of it for post-processing. While algorithm design has deepened into the study of increasingly time-efficient techniques, it has also opened outward, revealing that running time is just one of many sources of complexity that must be faced. In many applications—scheduling under real-time conditions, or managing a busy network—the input is not a static object but a dynamic one, with new data arriving continuously over time. Decisions must be made and solutions must be constructed adaptively, without knowledge of future input. In other applications, the computation is distributed over many processors, and one seeks algorithms that require as little communication, and synchronization, as possible. And through all these settings, from NP-complete problems onward, algorithms have been increasingly designed and analyzed with the understanding that the optimal solution may be unattainable, and that the optimum may have to serve only as an implicit benchmark against which the quality of the algorithm’s solution can be measured.

OCR for page 25
Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field The Lens of Computation Our contemplation of computation has led us quickly to the “P versus NP” question, now considered among the deepest open problems in mathematics and computer science. More recently, our views on complexity have been influenced by the striking confluence of computation and quantum physics: What happens to our standard notions of running time and complexity when the computation unfolds according to the principles of quantum mechanics? It is now known that access to such a hypothetical “quantum computer” would yield polynomial-time algorithms for certain problems (including integer factorization and the breaking of the RSA cryptosystem) that are believed to be intractable on standard computers. What are the ultimate limits of quantum computers? And are there theoretical obstacles to building them (in addition to the practical ones currently braved in labs all over the world)? These questions, purely computational in their origin, present some of the most daunting challenges facing theoretical physics today. Biology is a field where the synergy with computation seems to go ever deeper the more we look. Let us leave aside all the ways in which sophisticated algorithmic ideas are transforming the practice of biology with vast genomic and structural databases, massive numerical simulations of molecules, and the fearsome symbol-crunching of the Human Genome Project. Instead, consider how we might view molecular biology itself through a computational lens, with the cell as an information-processing engine. For fundamentally, a biological system like a cell is simply a chemical system in which the information content is explicit. The genome is part of the overall chemical system, but it is not there to take part in the chemistry itself; rather, it is there as a sophisticated encoding of the chemical processes that will take place. It is a programming abstraction—it is the representation of the real thing, co-existing with the thing itself. Just as computation distinguishes itself from the rest of technology, so are biological systems intrinsically different from all other physical and chemical systems—for they too have separated the application from the device. We can take a cell and change a few symbols in its genome—splice in a new gene or two—and we can cause its chemistry to change completely. We have replaced one piece of code with another; the device—the cellular hardware—has been left alone, while we simply changed the application running on it. This phenomenon really seems to have no parallel in the other sciences. Surely, the non-biological world obeys fundamental laws, but it does not contain—and actually implement—an explicit representation of these laws. Where in the solar system are the few molecules, encoding the laws of gravity and motion, which we could modify to cause the planets to follow more eccentric orbits?

OCR for page 25
Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field Computation as a technology that follows its own laws; computation as the quintessence of universality; computation as a powerful perspective on the world and on science—these are issues that still drive our study of the phenomenon today. And the more we grapple with the underlying principles of computation, the more we see their reflections and imprints on all disciplines—in the way structured tasks can be cast as stylized computational activities; in the surprising complexity of simple systems; and in the rich and organic interplay between information and code.

OCR for page 25
Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field QUANTUM INFORMATION PROCESSING Charles H. Bennett, IBM Research Computer science is based on a very fruitful abstraction whose roots are as old as mathematics but whose power was fully appreciated only in the 20th century: the notion that information and computation are a worthwhile object of study in their own right, independent of the physical apparatus used to carry the information or perform the computation. While at the most obvious level, Moore’s law (see Hill in this chapter) is a hardware success story, this success has only been possible because information is such an abstract stuff: make a bit a thousand times smaller and it remains useful for the same purposes as before, unlike a thousand-fold smaller car or potato. Although Moore’s law has survived many early predictions of its demise, no exponential growth can go on forever. The present few decades are clearly an exceptional time in the history of computing. Sooner or later something will have to give, since at the present rate of shrinkage, information technology will reach atomic dimensions within 20 years. Accordingly, considerable thought and long-range planning are already being devoted to the challenges of designing and fabricating devices at the atomic scale and getting them to work reliably, a field broadly known as nanotechnology. However, it has long been known that atoms and other tiny objects obey laws of quantum physics that in many respects defy common sense. For example, observing an atom disturbs its motion, while not observing it allows it to spread out and behave as if it were in several different places at the same time. Until recently, computer designers considered such quantum effects mostly as a nuisance that would cause small devices to be less reliable and more error-prone than their larger cousins. What is new, and what makes quantum informatics a coherent discipline, rather than a vexing set of technological problems, is the realization that quantum effects are not just a nuisance; rather, they offer a new and more comprehensive way of thinking about information, which can be exploited to perform important and otherwise impossible information-processing tasks. Already they have been used to create unconditionally secure cryptographic key agreement protocols, and in the future, if a quantum computer can be built, it could easily perform some computations (most notably the factorization of large numbers) that would take longer than the age of the universe by the best known algorithms, not only on today’s supercomputers, but also on the supercomputers of 2050 (by which time we predict Moore’s law will have ended).

OCR for page 25
Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field The way in which quantum effects can speed up computation is not a simple quantitative improvement, such as would result from using a faster processor, or some fixed number of parallel processors to speed up computations by some constant factor depending on the hardware. Rather it is a qualitative improvement in the functional form of the computation cost, similar to what one typically gets by discovering a smarter algorithm to solve a problem that previously seemed hard. With quantum information processing the physical form of information, for the first time, has a qualitative bearing on the efficiency with which it can be processed, and the things that can be done with it. Quantum computers do not speed up all computations equally: a few, like factoring, are sped up superpolynomially; general NP search problems like the Traveling Salesman Problem are sped up quadratically, while other problems are not sped up at all. But to say quantum computers offer the hope of using physical effects to dramatically speed up some computations is putting things backwards. In hindsight, it should rather be said that the laws of quantum physics, which as far as we know today apply to everything in the universe, provide a more powerful arsenal of physically performable mathematical operations than Turing imagined when he formalized the notion of a computer. Availing ourselves of this more powerful arsenal, although it does not enlarge the class of computable functions, makes some computational problems qualitatively easier than they seemed before. Unlike the former hope of a qualitative speedup from analog processing, which has largely been dashed by the ability of digital computers, via discrete approximation to simulate analog processes more accurately than they can be reproducibly performed in nature, quantum computation offers a realistic hope of qualitatively enlarging the scope of feasible computation. However, it should be noted that actually building a useful quantum computer presents formidable technical challenges, which will probably be overcome eventually, but not any time soon. The confidence that these obstacles can ultimately be overcome rests largely on the theory of quantum error correction and fault tolerance, developed since 1995. This theory, which is analogous to the classical theory of fault tolerance developed by von Neumann and others in the days when computers were made of vacuum tubes and relays, allows arbitrarily large reliable quantum computations to be done on imperfect hardware, provided the hardware exceeds some threshold of reliability. The technical problem is that the quantum threshold is higher than the classical threshold discovered by von Neumann, while today’s quantum computing hardware processes quantum information far less reliably than vacuum tubes process classical information, so there remains a gap of several orders of magnitude that

OCR for page 25
Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field still needs to be closed. There is every reason to believe it can be closed, but how and when remain to be seen. Just how do quantum information and the hardware used to process it differ from the ordinary classical type of information processing formalized by Turing? States of a Turing machine tape, or any other digital storage medium, are in principle reliably distinguishable, and the tape can be copied accurately without disturbing it. This is a reasonable idealization of the behavior of macroscopic information processing hardware like punch cards, electromechanical relays, and even today’s most advanced microprocessors and memory chips. But it has been known since the early 20th century that at an atomic and subatomic scale actual matter behaves more subtly: not all states are reliably distinguishable even in principle, and information stored in such states cannot be copied without disturbing it. Speaking metaphorically, quantum information is like the information in a dream: attempting to describe your dream to someone else changes your memory of it, so you begin to forget the dream and remember only what you said about it. This dreamlike behavior notwithstanding, quantum information obeys exact and well-understood laws. The so-called superposition principle holds that the possible states of any physical system correspond to directions in a d-dimensional space (“Hilbert space”), where the dimension d is characteristic of the system and represents the system’s maximum number of reliably distinguishable states. Two states are reliably distinguishable if and only if their Hilbert space directions are orthogonal (as is usually the case with macroscopic systems). Physically implementable operations on the system always conserve or reduce distinguishability, corresponding roughly to rigid rotations and projections in the Hilbert space. In the simplest nontrivial case d = 2 and the system (e.g., the internal state of an electron or photon, for example) is called a qubit. If two reliably distinguishable states of the qubit (e.g., horizontal and vertical polarizations for a photon) are arbitrarily designated |0> and |1>, a general state may be expressed as a linear combination α|0> + β|1>, where α and β are complex numbers such that |α|2 + |β|2 = 1. Another quantum principle, the projection postulate, holds that if a qubit in this state is subjected to an observation that would reliably distinguish |0> from |1>, the qubit behaves like |0> with probability |α|2 and like |1> with probability |β|2. Observing the system again yields no new information: the system again behaves like |0> or |1> according to the result of the first observation. More generally, observing a quantum system causes it to behave probabilistically, losing information about its previous state, except when the system was already in one of the states the observation was designed to distinguish. The art of quantum computing consists of accurately pre-

OCR for page 25
Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field paring the quantum computer in a desired initial state, performing a sequence of accurately controlled manipulations (rotations) of its state without observing it during the intermediate stages of the computation, and then finally observing the final state to obtain a useful output. This may sound a lot like analog computation, which is not believed to be significantly more powerful than conventional digital computation. How, one might ask, can a qubit—say a photon, which may be polarized at an arbitrary angle θ relative to the horizontal—be more powerful than an analog system—say a mechanical wheel oriented at angle θ relative to some standard position? At first sight, the wheel would appear more powerful. Not only can its orientation be accurately manipulated, but also the orientation (unlike a photon’s) can be observed quite precisely without significantly disturbing it. The essential difference, which makes quantum computation more powerful than analog computation, comes from the way individual information-bearing subsystems (e.g., qubits) combine to form a larger system (e.g., a quantum register, or a whole quantum computer). An n qubit register has 2n reliably distinguishable states corresponding to the n-bit strings |000…> through |111…1>; more generally the Hilbert space of a compound quantum system has a dimensionality equal to the product of the Hilbert space dimensions of its parts. By the superposition principle, the general state of an n qubit register corresponds to a direction in a 2n dimensional space; and during the computation the state may undergo controlled rotations in this large space. By contrast, an n wheel analog computer’s state lives in a parameter space of only n dimensions; more generally, an analog system’s parameter space has a dimensionality equal to the sum of the dimensionalities of its parts. The quantum computer’s advantage comes from its enormously larger state space. However, the advantage is rather subtle, because at the end of a quantum computation, in order to get a classical output, it is necessary to make an observation, and, by the projection postulate, doing so collapses the 2n parameter quantum state back down to n classical bits. This severe bottleneck at the end of the computation means that an n qubit quantum computer cannot process any greater volume of information than an n bit classical computer. However, for some computations, it can do the processing in far fewer steps because of the extra maneuvering room the large Hilbert space provides during intermediate stages of the computation. As noted earlier, the big technical barrier to be overcome in constructing a quantum computer is to make the rate of hardware errors, during the unobserved portion of the computation preceding the final observation, sufficiently small. This is qualitatively similar to the problem digital computers faced in the era of vacuum tubes and relays, but quantitatively worse, because a quantum computer needs to be isolated much more

OCR for page 25
Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field carefully from its environment to attain a given level of reliability. In particular, because of the disturbing effect of observation on quantum systems, quantum computers must be designed to prevent information about the data being processed from leaking out of the computer into the environment before the end of the computation. (If such premature leakage took place, the computation would begin to behave like a classical probabilistic computation instead of a quantum one, and the advantages of quantum speedup would be lost.) Fortunately the formalism of quantum error correction and fault tolerance allows arbitrarily good protection against such leakage to be achieved, provided the basic hardware exceeds some finite threshold of reliability. Aside from computation per se, quantum information science includes the disciplines of quantum communication and quantum cryptography. The latter field is at a far more mature stage of development than is quantum computation per se, with successful laboratory experiments and even a few startup companies. Quantum cryptography is based on the fact that eavesdropping on quantum systems disturbs them. In a typical implementation, a random sequence of N faint polarized light pulses is sent through an optical fiber, after which the sender and receiver, by public discussion of the sent and received signals, estimate the amount of disturbance and hence of potential eavesdropping. If it is too great, they abort the protocol. Otherwise they can proceed to derive from the sent and received signals a shorter sequence of random secret key bits on which the eavesdropper has arbitrarily little information. More precisely it can be shown that any eavesdropping strategy obeying the laws of quantum physics, even when assisted by unlimited computing power, yields only exponentially little expected information on the final key sequence, if any. The eavesdropper thus faces the dilemma of eavesdropping gently and learning essentially nothing, or eavesdropping strongly and causing the protocol to abort. Quantum cryptography is practical because it does not require a full fledged quantum computer, only classical computers supplemented by equipment for generating, transporting, and detecting quantum signals, all of which are available today. Unlike classical methods of key agreement, it is unconditionally secure, and thus impervious to future improvements in algorithms or computing power. Although it was inspired by physics, quantum information processing is a mathematically coherent and well-characterized extension of classical information processing. Indeed the latter can now best be viewed as a useful but limited subset of the larger subject of quantum information processing, somewhat as the real numbers are a useful but limited subset of the complex numbers. To continue the analogy, quantum information processing provides solutions, or improved solutions, to some problems in classical computation and cryptography, just as the complex plane

OCR for page 25
Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field provides solutions and insights into problems in real analysis not explicitly involving complex variables. For this reason, even aside from its technological implications, quantum informatics is an intellectually exciting discipline, with far-reaching implications for the basic mathematical and physical sciences, both theoretical and experimental. It is already providing new ways of thinking about a wide variety of scientific and technical questions, and has begun to affect how science is taught, in a way that will bring a deeper understanding of the fruitful abstraction that is information not only to computer scientists but also to a broad segment of the lay public. For further information: Jozef Gruska, Quantum Computing (McGraw-Hill, 1999, ISBN 007 709503 0) Michael Nielsen and Isaac L. Chuang, Quantum Computation and Quantum Information (Cambridge University Press, 2000, ISBN 0 0521 63235 8) U.S. National Science Foundation report on quantum information science: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2000/nsf00101/nsf00101.htm Online course notes: http://www.theory.caltech.edu/%7Epreskill/ph219/ http://www.cs.berkeley.edu/~vazirani/qc.html Other quantum information Web sites: http://www.research.ibm.com/quantuminfo/ http://www.iro.umontreal.ca/labs/theorique/index.html.en http://www.qubit.org/