Appendix A
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Diran Apelian, Chair, is Howmet Professor of Engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) and director of WPI's Metals Processing Institute. Dr. Apelian completed a 6-year tour of duty (1990-1996) as provost of WPI. He worked at Bethlehem Steel's Homer Research Laboratories before joining Drexel University's faculty in 1976. At Drexel he held various positions, including the following: professor, head of the Department of Materials Engineering, associate dean of the College of Engineering, and vice provost. Having joined WPI in 1990, Dr. Apelian oversees the metal-processing activities, including three consortia: metal casting, powder metallurgy, and thermal processing/heat treating. He is credited with pioneering work in various areas of solidification processing, including molten metal processing and filtration of metals, aluminum foundry engineering, plasma deposition, and spray casting and forming. Dr. Apelian received his B.S. degree in metallurgical engineering from Drexel University and his Sc.D. in materials science and engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He is the recipient of many distinguished honors and awards, including honorary membership in the French Metallurgical Society; an honorary doctorate from Northwestern Polytechnic University in Xian, China; the Champion H. Mathewson Gold Medal; the Howe Medal; and the Howard Taylor Gold Medal. Dr. Apelian has more than 380 publications to his credit and serves on several technical and corporate boards.

Andrew Alleyne is the Ralph M. and Catherine V. Fisher Professor of Engineering in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). He is also an associate professor at the Coordinated Science Laboratory. His research interests focus on the modeling, analysis, and control of mechanical systems with an emphasis on automotive and manufacturing systems. Dr. Alleyne has also been a visiting professor of vehicle mechatronics in the Faculty of Design, Engineering, and Production at Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands; a faculty fellow at Caterpillar, Inc.; a faculty fellow at the Ford Motor Company; a member of the research staff at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory; and an engineer in the Rochester Products Division of General Motors. Dr. Alleyne graduated magna cum laude from Princeton University with a B.S.E. in Aerospace Engineering. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California at Berkeley's Mechanical Engineering Department. He has several honors and publications, including the Society of Automotive Engineers Ralph R. Teetor Educational Award; the Xerox Award for Faculty Research; a National Science Foundation (NSF) Faculty Early Development (CAREER) Award; the Princeton University Raymond S. Greenlea Award; the Accenture Award for Excellence in Advising at the UIUC College of Engineering; and the Engineering Council Award for Excellence in Advising at the UIUC



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Accelerating Technology Transition: Bridging the Valley of Death for Materials and Processes in Defense Systems Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Diran Apelian, Chair, is Howmet Professor of Engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) and director of WPI's Metals Processing Institute. Dr. Apelian completed a 6-year tour of duty (1990-1996) as provost of WPI. He worked at Bethlehem Steel's Homer Research Laboratories before joining Drexel University's faculty in 1976. At Drexel he held various positions, including the following: professor, head of the Department of Materials Engineering, associate dean of the College of Engineering, and vice provost. Having joined WPI in 1990, Dr. Apelian oversees the metal-processing activities, including three consortia: metal casting, powder metallurgy, and thermal processing/heat treating. He is credited with pioneering work in various areas of solidification processing, including molten metal processing and filtration of metals, aluminum foundry engineering, plasma deposition, and spray casting and forming. Dr. Apelian received his B.S. degree in metallurgical engineering from Drexel University and his Sc.D. in materials science and engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He is the recipient of many distinguished honors and awards, including honorary membership in the French Metallurgical Society; an honorary doctorate from Northwestern Polytechnic University in Xian, China; the Champion H. Mathewson Gold Medal; the Howe Medal; and the Howard Taylor Gold Medal. Dr. Apelian has more than 380 publications to his credit and serves on several technical and corporate boards. Andrew Alleyne is the Ralph M. and Catherine V. Fisher Professor of Engineering in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). He is also an associate professor at the Coordinated Science Laboratory. His research interests focus on the modeling, analysis, and control of mechanical systems with an emphasis on automotive and manufacturing systems. Dr. Alleyne has also been a visiting professor of vehicle mechatronics in the Faculty of Design, Engineering, and Production at Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands; a faculty fellow at Caterpillar, Inc.; a faculty fellow at the Ford Motor Company; a member of the research staff at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory; and an engineer in the Rochester Products Division of General Motors. Dr. Alleyne graduated magna cum laude from Princeton University with a B.S.E. in Aerospace Engineering. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California at Berkeley's Mechanical Engineering Department. He has several honors and publications, including the Society of Automotive Engineers Ralph R. Teetor Educational Award; the Xerox Award for Faculty Research; a National Science Foundation (NSF) Faculty Early Development (CAREER) Award; the Princeton University Raymond S. Greenlea Award; the Accenture Award for Excellence in Advising at the UIUC College of Engineering; and the Engineering Council Award for Excellence in Advising at the UIUC

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Accelerating Technology Transition: Bridging the Valley of Death for Materials and Processes in Defense Systems College of Engineering. Carol A. Handwerker is chief of the Metallurgy Division at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Her expertise is in the area of materials and processes development. Dr. Handwerker joined the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) in 1984 as a National Research Council postdoctoral research associate, working on the relationship between stress and diffusion in solids and on composition effects on sintering and grain growth. Her research has focused on the thermodynamics and kinetics of interface processes, with applications to electronic packaging, composites, reactive wetting, sintering, and grain growth. Dr. Handwerker received a B.A. in art history from Wellesley College; she then went on to receive a B.S. in materials science and engineering and an M.S. and an Sc.D. degree in ceramics from MIT. She was awarded the Department of Commerce Bronze Medal for her contributions to the understanding of interface reactions in composites, the Department of Commerce Silver Medal for her contributions to solder science, and the Richard Fulrath Award from the Northern California Section of the American Ceramic Society. Dr. Handwerker is a fellow of the American Society for Metals International, and the American Ceramic Society (ACerS), and she is past chair of the ACerS Basic Science Division. She is on the Technical Advisory Committee for National Electronics Manufacturing Initiative, the board of trustees of the Gordon Research Conferences, the Visiting Committee for the MIT Department of Materials Science and Engineering, the Advisory Committee of Carnegie Mellon University's Mesoscale Interface Mapping Project, the editorial board for the Annual Reviews of Materials Research, and several governmental advisory groups. She has authored more than 80 scientific publications. Deborah Hopkins is a staff scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, where she heads the Engineering Division’s Technology Transfer and Industry Partnerships Group. She also leads a multidisciplinary research team working on the collaborative research and development with industry partners. Her current projects include the development of an ultrasonic phased-array system for the inspection of spot welds and the development and analysis of thermal insulation and window technologies, in collaboration with partners in the automotive industry; the development of technologies for rock characterization during drilling, in collaboration with partners in the mining industry; and the development of cooling strategies for optoelectronic components, in collaboration with partners in the telecommunications industry. Dr. Hopkins is an active participant in several international research collaborations and has recently served as a visiting professor at the University of Bordeaux, France, where her analytical models are being used to study the hydromechanical behavior of natural rock fractures on the basis of data from French laboratory and field experiments. She has twice served as a visiting scholar at the Bureau de Recherches Géologiques et Minières in France doing similar work. As a visiting professor at the Technical University of Lund, Sweden, in 1996, Dr. Hopkins taught a graduate course on statistical methods and performed research on the role of public policy in fostering technological advancements for the development of cleaner, more fuel-efficient automobiles. Dr. Hopkins holds a B.S. double major in mathematics and environmental economics and a secondary teaching credential in mathematics and social studies from the University of Washington, Seattle; she also received an M.A. in statistics and a Ph.D. in materials science and mineral engineering from the University of California at Berkeley. She has published numerous papers on the subjects of nondestructive evaluation and the mechanical and acoustic behavior of fractures and joints. Jacqueline A. Isaacs is an associate professor in the Department of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering at Northeastern University. Her research areas include environmentally benign manufacturing, competitive economic and environmental analyses of alternative materials throughout the product life cycle, modeling tools developed and applied to various competing manufacturing methods, and analysis of end-of-life disposal strategies for automobiles with policy repercussions. Her past positions were as assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering at Northeastern University; the director of environmental programs in the Materials Systems Laboratory at MIT; and a research engineer at the Aluminium Research Laboratories

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Accelerating Technology Transition: Bridging the Valley of Death for Materials and Processes in Defense Systems in Ranshofen, Austria. Dr. Isaacs holds a B.S. in metallurgical engineering and materials science from Carnegie Mellon University, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in materials science and engineering from MIT. She has several honors and publications, including the Bright Idea Award from the Professional Organizational and Development Network in Higher Education competition for supporting faculty development, the Northeastern University Excellence in Teaching Award, and the NSF CAREER Development Award. Gregory B. Olson is the Wilson-Cook Chaired Professor in Engineering Design in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Northwestern University. The aim of his research is to approach at the most fundamental level possible those classical problems of physical metallurgy that remain of central importance to materials science and engineering. Directed at phenomena of broad relevance to materials, Dr. Olson’s research is often focused on steels as a unique class of materials whose vast database allows a sophistication of approach not feasible in any other material. His current research areas include the following: a general kinematic theory of interphase boundary structure, the mechanism and kinetics of coupled diffusional and displacive transformations, the electronic basis of embrittlement mechanisms in metals, the design of new steels from first principles, and new applications of materials science to molecular biology. His research seeks to strengthen and expand the paradigms that can identify materials science as a viable discipline, while incorporating usable developments in the related fields of physics and chemistry. A major thrust of Dr. Olson’s current research centers on a university-government-industry program coordinating 30 investigators on high-strength steel technology, which aspires to improve the science-based engineering of materials. His future research and teaching interests lie in a synthesis of theory of phase transformations and mechanical behavior to develop a general kinetic theory of microstructural evolution applicable to both structure control and micromechanical processes in structural materials, and the incorporation of systems analysis concepts. Dr. Olson received his B.S., M.S., and Sc.D. degrees in materials engineering from MIT. He has several honors, patents, and publications. His honors include being named a fellow of the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society and a fellow of ASM International. He has also received a number of awards, including an AMAX Foundation fellowship, an NSF Creativity Extension Award, the Army Materials Technology Laboratory Special Service Award, the Jacob Wallenberg Foundation Award (Sweden), the M.R. Tenenbaum Award from the Iron and Steel Society, and a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Technology Recognition Award. He has also been an Alpha Sigma Mu lecturer for ASM International. Ranji Vaidyanathan is manager of Advanced Materials at Advanced Ceramics Research, Inc. His major area of expertise is that of accelerated product development techniques for functional metal, ceramic, and composite parts. His product development achievements include water-soluble tooling materials for polymer composite fabrication of environmentally friendly products, generating about $100,000 in sales in one year from sales in the United States, Europe, and Japan; Osteoceram (Plasti-Bone), a biocompatible tissue engineering material developed to replace the current set of bone replacement materials, which can be custom-fabricated from computer-aided design models; and an in situ foaming technique for metal foam components, which can be fabricated directly from computer models. Dr. Vaidyanathan’s other research interests include solid freeform fabrication of polymers, ceramics, metals, and composites; rheology; fracture mechanics, life-prediction using analytical modeling; and tissue engineering using polymer- and ceramic-matrix composites. He has also been an adjunct associate professor in the Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering of the University of Arizona; a senior research scientist at the Materials and Electrochemical Research Corporation; a research fellow in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Johns Hopkins University; a research associate in the Center for Ceramic Research at Rutgers University; and a research associate in the Department of Mechanical Engineering of the North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University. Dr. Vaidyanathan has a B.S. in metallurgical engineering from Banaras Hindu University, India; an M.S.M.E in mechanical engineering and a Ph.D. in materials science and engineering from the North Carolina State University. He has several honors, patents, and publications, including the R&D 100 Award in 2001 for developing water-

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Accelerating Technology Transition: Bridging the Valley of Death for Materials and Processes in Defense Systems soluble tooling materials for the fabrication of polymer matrix composite articles. Sandra DeVincent Wolf is an expert in the area of materials characterization and performance. She has worked on a number of projects in this area, beginning with the development of a gas tungsten arc welding process and on the characterization of weldment properties of aluminum armor alloys at the U.S. Army Materials Technology Center in Watertown, Massachusetts. She was a National Research Council fellow at the NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, where her research focused on the development of graphite-fiber-reinforced copper composites, including alloy wetting studies and diffusion modeling, pressure infiltration casting of graphite/copper composites, and thermal and mechanical characterization of those composites. As manager of R&D at PCC Composites, Inc., Dr. Wolf was responsible for overseeing the development and characterization of various silicon carbide-reinforced aluminum alloy composites. She joined Westinghouse Plant Apparatus Division (later Bechtel Plant Machinery, Inc.) in 1996 and was responsible for the specification, procurement, and qualification of automated welding and cutting equipment. In addition, she led a team to design reusable mock-ups for testing the welding and cutting equipment and to develop the production procedures and technical manuals necessary to utilize that equipment. Dr. Wolf has a B.S. in materials science and engineering from MIT and an M.S. and Ph.D. in materials science and engineering from Case Western Reserve University. She has published numerous papers, particularly in the area of fabrication, characterization, and performance of composite materials. She is an active member of ASM International and is currently a member of its Materials Solutions Exhibition Committee, a member of its Technical Programming Board, chair of the ASM’s Primary Metals Sector, and treasurer of the ASM Pittsburgh Chapter. She has been active in various roles in both the Cleveland and Pittsburgh Chapters of ASM and was recognized as the ASM Pittsburgh Chapter Outstanding Young Member in 1999 as well as receiving the President’s Award in 2004.